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Full text of "Proceedings of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois"

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ALEXANDER H. BELL 
M. W. Grand Master, 1908-1909 



THE SEVENTIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, HEED AT 
CHICAGO, OCTOBER 12, 13, AND 14, 1909. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



Most Worshipful 



Grand Lodge 

OF 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 

of the State of Illinois 



ALBERT B. ASHLEY, M.W. Grand Master 
ISAAC CUTTER, R.W. Grand Secretary 



Bloomington, Illinois 

Pantagrapn Printing and Stationery Co., Printers. 

1909. 



OFFICERS OF THE MOST WORSHIPFUL 

Grand Lodge 

of 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 



OF TH E 



State of Illinois 



1909-10 



Albert B. Ashley... 
Delmar D. Darrah. 
Henry T. Burnap . . 
Ralph H. Wheeler.. 
Leroy A. Goddard 



. . .M.W. Grattid Master Decatur 

. . -R.W. Deputy Grand Master. . .Bloomington 
...R.W. Senior Grand Warden. .Upper Alton 
..R.W. Junior Grand Warden. .Chicago 

. . R.W. Grand Treasurer Chicago 

Isaac Cutter R.W. Grand Secretary Camp Point 

Rev. J. Webster Bailey. . .R.W. Grand Chaplain Ottawa 

Rev. Frank G. Smith . . . . .R. W. Grand Orator Chicago 

Geo. A. Stadler W. Deputy Grand Secretary. .Decatur 

N. J. Cary W. Grand Pursuivant Utica 

A. W. West W. Grand Marshal Galesburg 

James John. W. Grand Standard Bearer. . .Chicago 

Robert Fletcher W. Grand Sword Bearer LaGrange 

T. E. Gillespie W. Senior Grand Deacon Vienna 

W. H. Peak W. Junior Grand Deacon Jonesboro 

G. W. Hamilton W. Grand Stezvard Prairie City 

H. S. Albin W. Grand Steward Chicago 

Chas. F. Tenney. W. Grand Steward Bement 

James L. Scott W. Grand Steward Mattoon 

Chester S. Gurney Bro. Grand Tyler Chicago 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE MOST WORSHIPFUL 



Grand Lodge 



Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 



OF TH E 



State of Illinois 



AT ITS SEVENTIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



In compliance with the provisions of the Constitution and 
By-Laws of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois, the Sev- 
entieth Annual Communication was held in the city of Chi- 
cago, at Medinah Temple, .commencing on Tuesday, the 
twelfth day of October, A. D. 1909, A. L. 5909, at 10 o'clock 
a. m., and was opened in Ample Form by the M.W. Grand 
Master, Alexander H. Bell. 

PEAYEE. 
The RAV. Grand Chaplain, J. Webster Bailey, led the 

devotions. 

Our Father and God, .Supreme Ruler of the Universe, Whose we 
are and Whom we serve, we invoke Thy blessing upon us as here we 
begin the duties of the hour and the day. Thou hast promised wisdom 
to those who will seek it at Thy hand. Grant that the business of this 
great order of men may be conducted with judgment and discretion, that 
Thy name may receive honor, and our lodges a blessing. So when this 
and all our earthly work is finished grant us all a habitation in "that 
house not made with hands, eternal in the Heavens." Amen. 



Proceedings of the (October 12, 



KEPOKT— Committee on Credentials. 

Bro. George W. Cyrus, Chairman of the Committee on 
Credentials, announced that representatives from a constitu- 
tional number of lodges were present, and asked further time 
for completing the report. 

The request was granted. 

Brothers Kurzenknabe and Kopp, members of St. Cecilia 
Lodge No. 875, and Brother Bowman, of Germania Lodge 
No. 182, favored the Grand Lodge with a delightful musical 
program. 

COMMITTEES. 

The R.W. Grand Secretary read the following names of 
brethren appointed by the M.W. Grand Master to serve on 
the various committees during the present session of the 
Grand Lodge : 

Jurisprudence — Edward Cook, John M. Pearson, C. E. Allen, W. B. 
Wright, H. A. Snell. 

Appeals and Grievances — Monroe C. Crawford, Joseph E. Dyas, 
Geo. R. Smith, H. H. Montgomery, A. W. West. 

Chartered Lodges — Chas. F. Hitchcock, W. A. Dixon, Jas. L. Scott, 
C. M. Turner, S. M. Schoemann. 

Lodges U.D.— H. C. Mitchell, John Johnston, I. H. Todd, M. B. 
Iott, J. W. Hamilton. 

Mileage and Per Diem — W. F. Beck, G. A. Lackens, H. T. Goddard. 

Finance — S. O. Spring, N. N. Lampert, Thos. A. Stevens. 

Correspondence — Edward Cook. 

Credentials — Geo. W. Cyrus, W. E. Hadley, C. E. Grove. 

Obituaries— C. H. Thompson, C. N. Hambleton, S. W. Eldred. 

Grand Master's Address — J. E. Wooters, J. M. Hannum, H. L. 
Browning. 

Railroads and Transportation — J. O. Clifford, O. E. Tandy. 
Petitions — Ben Hagle, J. E. Wheat, F. E. Baldwin. 
To Examine Visitors — Chas. H. Martin, S. S. Borden, A. H. Scrogin, 
Chas. S. DeHart, R. F. Morrow. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 5 

GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS. 
The Grand Master then read his annual address. 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., of the State of Illinois: 

On the completion Of my second term as your Grand Master, I come 
before you to give a report of my actions and to state something of the 
business transacted by me during the past year. 

The past year has been an unusually busy one. I have had a vast 
amount of work to do and have sometimes been oppressed with the vol- 
ume of business crowding upon me for attention. I thought I was a 
busy man before I became Grand Master. By comparison with my life 
since then I had led a life of comparative leisure. Because of the volume 
of work to be done, I have necessarily been compelled to appoint proxies 
on most occasions for the laying of corner-stones, the dedication of tem- 
ples and the constituting of new lodges. I want you to know that it 
would have been a very great pleasure to me to attend to all these func- 
tions in person, but the volume of business requiring my attention made 
it necessary that I do most of such work by my proxies. 

The affairs of this Grand Lodge and of its many constituent lodges 
are in a most prosperous condition. The returns to the Grand Secretary 
show a total membership in this state of over ninety-five thousand. With 
the large income of this Grand Lodge, and the important enterprises in 
which it is engaged, the Grand Master, who is the executive officer of 
the Grand Lodge, is required to give the business of his office unremit- 
ting attention. I have had an unusual amount of financial and business 
responsibility put upon me during my two terms of office. The sale of 
the Orphans' Home property in Chicago last year, the purchase of the 
site for the new Orphans' Home at LaGrange this year, and many other 
business matters have necessarily required my attention. 

My correspondence has been voluminous, and the responsibility has 
been great. Numberless disputes and difficulties have arisen, but by the 
exercise of patience and good nature, I have been able to adjust them 
all without leaving any wreckage on the way. 

Very shortly after the close of the last session of this Grand Lodge, 
I appointed as District Deputies the following named brethren for the 
districts named opposite each : 

1 Harry W. Harvey. . .Chicago 9 James M. Huff Belvidere 

2 R. R. Jampolis Chicago 10 John W. Oliver. Apple River 

3 Albert Roullier Chicago 11 W. J. Emerson Oregon 

4 David D. King Chicago 12 James McCredie ....Aurora 

5 Wm. H. Beid Chicago 13 W. C. Stilson Morrison 

6 Edw. W. Peterson... Chicago 14 Milton T. Booth Atkinson 

7 Louis Pickett Chicago 15 F. H. Bradley Wyanet 

8 Jay L. Brewster. .Waukegan 16 S. B. Bradford Ottawa 



Proceedings of the 



(October 12, 



17 J. B. Fithian Joliet 

18 N. T. Stevens Clifton 

19 L. E. Rockwood. Gibson City 

20 John C. Weis Peoria 

21 C. T. Holmes Galesburg 

22 C. L. Gregory Aledo 

23 Emerson Clark . . Farmington 

24 David H. Glass Rushville 

25 L. W. Lawton Delavan 

26 Harry M. Palmer. . .McLean 

27 C. L. Sandusky Danville 

28 Wilson P. Jones Tolono 

29 N. M. Mesnard Boody 

30 Sidney E. Breese. Springfield 

31 C. P. Ross Jacksonville 

32 W. W. Watson Barry 

33 Emmett Howard . ...Quincy 



34 Ralph M. Riggs. .Winchester 

35 C. H. Burgdorff. . .Carlinville 
3G D. W. Starr Raymond 

37 Chas. ,G. Young. . .Taylorville 

38 J. E. Jeffers.. Areola 

39 H. Gassaway ...Martinsville 

40 H. A. Eidson... Willow Hill 

41 Eugene Stapp Vandalia 

42 Anthony Doherty. .Clay City 

43 Enos Johnson. . .Upper Alton 

44 Geo. S. Caughlan.E. St. Louis 

45 W. M. Webster Benton 

46 J. R. Ennis. .. .Burnt Prairie 

47 I. A. Foster New Haven 

48 W. D. Abney Marion 

49 W. H. Peak Jonesboro 

50 J. K. West Brookport 



Grand Lecturers. 
Immediately after the close of the last Grand Lodge, I issued com- 
missions in renewal of those before then issued to the following Grand 
Lecturers : 



NAMi". ADDRESS. 

W. B. Grimes Pittsfield 

Charles F. Tenney Bement 

A. B. Ashley La Grange 

James John Chicago 

H. S. Hurd Chicago 

J. R. Ennis Burnt Prairie 

H. T. Burnap Upper Alton 

H. A. Snell Litchfield 

Isaac Cutter Camp Point 

M. B. Iott Chicago 

A. W. West Galesburg 

G. A. Stadler Decatur 

John E. Morton Perry 

W. O. Butler.... La Harpe 

Wm. E. Ginther. Charleston 

T. H. Humphreys Charleston 

C. Rohrbough Kinmundy 

D. E. Bruffett Urbana 

I. H. Todd E. St. Louis 

C. E. Grove Rock Island 

H. C. Yetter . Galesburg 

C. E. Allen Galesburg 

D. D. Darrah Bloomington 

H. S. Albin Chicago 

J. M. Willard Decatur 

J. E. Wheat Sterling 

Arthur G. Goodridge. .Irv. Park 
S. M. Schoemann. .McLeansboro 

W. K. Bowling Thayer 

J. G. Seitz Upper Alton 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

N. B. Carson Bloomington 

H. A. Eidson Willow Hill 

David Richards ... Chicago Lawn 
Louis J. Frahm ........ Chicago 

Geo. E. Carlson Moline 

E. C. Jackson . Chicago 

G. M. Harmison Chicago 

H. M. Witt Chicago 

J. K. West Brookport 

A. T. Summers Decatur 

C. B. Pavlicek Chicago 

Andrew McNally Chicago 

J. M. Simpson Chicago 

W. P. Jones Tolono 

W. H. Rupe Olney 

W. W. Roberts . Nunda 

Alva W. Cain Chicago 

W. H. Welch Lexington 

Hiram Vanderbilt ..... .Chicago 

P. A. Reinhard Peoria 

D. D. King Chicago 

L. E. Simons Chicago 

M. T. Booth Atkinson 

E. T. Osgood Harvey 

H. W. Mason Bloomington 

C. L. Montgomery. .Blue Mound 
J. S. Edmondson Decatur 

F. D. Fletcher Chatham 

C. M. Borchers Decatur 

F. H. Blose Bloomington 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

Chas. G. Young Taylorville 

Emerson Clark Farmington 

James McCredie Aurora 

W. H. Peak Jonesboro 

Enos Johnson Upper Alton 

C. N. Hambleton. . . Jefrersonville 

G. A. Lackens Good Hope 

A. O. Novander Chicago 

J. B. Roach Aurora 

T. N. Cummins Reevesville 

Louis Pickett Pullman 

Anthony Doherty Clay City 

Chas. T. Holmes Galesburg 

C. P. Ross Jacksonville 

Lawrence C. Johnson Galva 

Archibald Birse Chicago 

F. M. Pendleton Quincy 

R. H. Wheeler Chicago 

R. W. King Chicago 

E. E. Beach Chicago 

W. H. Robson Chicago 

H. W. Harvey Chicago 

F. H. Morehouse Chicago 

F. J. Burton Chicago 

I. A x Foster New Haven 

C. M. Babbitt Oregon 

S. M. Frankland Chicago 

C. B. Ward Rock Island 

J. G. Huntoon Rock Island 

G. R. Smith Bloomington 

John H. Griffiths. Downers Grove 

A. Jampolis Chicago 

W. A. Dixon Decatur 

Edw. W. Peterson Chicago 

Albert Davis Chicago 

Albert Roullier Chicago 

E. D. Brothers Chicago 

N. M. Mesnard Boody 

John C. Weis Peoria 

Adam Schmidt Chicago 

Wm. Balhatchet Chicago 

H. E. Van Loon ...Chicago 

E. W. Eggman East St. Louis 

Will C. Stilson Tampico 

H. C. Michels Flora 

C. J. Wightman Grays Lake 

William Gardner Chicago 

W. H. Bied Chicago 

Peter C. Gray Chicago 

William Rothmann Chicago 

Emmett Howard Quincy 

W. E. Anderson Chicago 

J. M. Hederick Chatham 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

T. H. Land Carmi 

B. A. Cottlow Oregon 

A. I. Porges Chicago 

Wm. E. Fitch LaSalle 

Wm. Grube LaSalle 

Samuel Bradford Ottawa 

Herman Blanchard. Chicago Hts. 

L. E. Rockwood Gibson City 

W. A. Hoover Gibson City 

L. B. Dyer Chicago 

Geo.N. Todd Mattoon 

William Ferris Wood . . Chicago 
William Geo. Houghton. Chicago 
John Frederick Lockett. .Chicago 

J. M. James Benton 

Roys Nelson Strohn Aurora 

Orien Ely Tandy. .. .Jacksonville 
Floyd Orlando Lorton. . .Auburn 

John Thomas Pierce Decatur 

James Lloyd Hammond. Wilmette 
William Austin Mentzer. Chicago 
Thomas Weeks ....Bloomington 

Fred Grove Trenary LaSalle 

Richard Daniel Mills Ottawa 

Wm. Elmer Edwards. .. .Chicago 
Charles Seymour Borden Chicago 
James Elsworth Jeff ers. . .Areola 

Zarah S. Savior Oakwood 

Schuyler Colfax Scrimger.Pekin 

C. A. Pratner TEdinburg 

H. M. Palmer McLean 

W. B. Moore Chicago 

W. D. Price Chicago 

Harry A. Dever Chicago 

Walter E. Marble Chicago 

Theodore Christensen ...Chicago 

James M. Huff Belvidere 

George Low Chicago 

H. H. Milnor Chicago 

A. R. Howser Decatur 

H. O. Folrath Decatur 

Chas. H. Graves Chicago 

H. M. Robinson Chicago 

C. H. Thompson Cairo 

Amos Ball Gibson City 

O. H. Woodworth Areola 

R. H. Gully Tolono 

R. M. Riggs Winchester 

Otto Brail Chicago 

J- W. Milk Granite City 

Alfred E. Holmes Chicag ) 

W. C. Tow-bridge Crete 

C. L. Gregory Aledo 



Proceedings of the 



(October 12, 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

D. W. Starr Raymond 

J. M. Hannum Lostant 

Nimrod Mace Bloomington 

R. G. Bright Normal 

W. S. Welsh Toulon 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

James F. Boyle Chicago 

Frank F. Collins Areola 

John H. Brown Chicago 

A. B. Collom Marissa 

John W. Johnson Chicago 



Since the last session of the Grand Lodge, original commissions as 
Grand Lecturers have been issued upon the recommendation of the Board 
of Grand Examiners to the following brethren : 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

J. E. Glathart Olney 

David C. Hibbott Chicago 

Boyd S. Blaine Champaign 

William N. Ewing McLean 

Charles S. Lawrence. .Lexington 
T. Bryson Strauss. . .Gibson City 

B. I. Pumpelly Atlanta 

Arthur E. Wood. .. .Gibson City 

George Edwards Chicago 

Walter T. Boggess .Catlin 

Almon Stansberry . . . .Westville 

N. E. Porter Edinburg 

Clarence A. Tucker Findlay 



NAME. ADDRESS. 

Herbert C. Bush Decatur 

Frank H. Bradley Wyanet 

Lewis A. Brinkman Chicago 

Albert P. William Chicago 

Thomas G. Kerwin Chicago 

Elmer Tregay LaSalle 

Richard B. Prendergast .Chicago 
Francis M. Cruikshank. .Chicago 
George W. Flood. .. .Rock Island 

Sidney S. Pollack Chicago 

Henry Gasaway ....Martinsville 

J. A. P. Wesch Areola 

J. I. Brydon Martinsville 



Lodges Instituted. 



During the year, I have issued dispensations for the formation of 
new lodges as follows, and they were respectively instituted on the dates 
and in the manner following : 

Elwood Lodge at Elwood, Illinois, was instituted on November 19. 

1908, by Bro. John B. Fithian, D.D.G.M. 

Republic Lodge, of Chicago, Illinois, was instituted on February 26. 

1909, by Bro. Albert Roullier, D.D.G.M. 

Cottonwood Lodge, at Cottonwood, Illinois, was instituted on April 
16, 1909, by Bro. I. A. Foster, D.D.G.M. 

Jackson Park Lodge, of Chicago, Illinois, was instituted on June 12. 
1909, by Bro. William H. Bied, D.D.G.M. 

Welcome Lodge, of Chicago, Illinois, was instituted on June 19, 
1909, by Bro. R. R. Jampolis, D.D.G.M. 

Concord Lodge, of Chicago, Illinois, was instituted on July 1, 1909, 
by Bro. Harry Harvey, D.D.G.M. 

Avondale Lodge, at Chicago, Illinois, was instituted on October 7, 
1909, by Bro. David D. King, D.D.G.M. 



1^09.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



Lodges Constituted. 

At the last session of this Grand Lodge, charters were ordered to 
be issued to the lodges hereafter named and accordingly such charters 
were issued and such lodges were severally constituted as follows : 

Ancient Craft Lodge No. 907, of Chicago, Illinois, was constituted 
on October 14, 190S, by Bro. Robert R. Jampolis, D.D.G.M., acting as 
my proxy. 

Gil. W. Barnard Lodge No. 908, of Chicago, Illinois, was consti- 
tuted on October 16, 190S, by Bro. Louis Pickett, D.D.G.M., acting as 
my proxy. 

Beehive Lodge No. 909, of Chicago, Illinois, was constituted on Oc- 
tober 19, 1908, by Bro. Albert Roullier, D.D.G.M., acting as my proxy. 

Hull Lodge No. 910, of Hull, Illinois, was duly constituted on Octo- 
ber 24, 1908, by Bro. Emmett Howard, D.D.G.M., acting as my proxy. 

Coffeen Lodge No. 906, of Coffeen, Illinois, was duly constituted 
on October 23, 1908, by Bro. D. W. Starr, D.D.G.M., acting as my proxy. 

Elkhart Lodge No. 903, of Elkhart, Illinois, was duly constituted on 
November 2, 1908, by Bro. D. D. Darrah, Right Worshipful Senior Grand 
Warden, acting as my proxy. 

Carlock Lodge No. 904, of Mechanicsburg, Illinois, was duly con- 
stituted on November 5, 1908, by Bro. Sidney S. Breese, D.D.G.M., act- 
ing as my proxy. 

Hanover Lodge No. 905, of Hanover, Illinois, was duly constituted 
on October 21, 1908, by Bro. J. W. Oliver, D.D.G.M., acting as my proxy. 

Alto Lodge No. 902, of Stewart, Illinois, was duly constituted on 
November 5, 1908, by Bro. W. C. Stilson, D.D.G.M., acting as my proxy. 

Corner-Stones Laid. 

I present herewith as a part hereof a statement showing the com- 
position of the Occasional Grand Lodges convened for the purpose of 
laying corner-stones, as follows : 

On October 29, 1908, Worshipful Bro. C. L. Sandusky, as my proxy, 
laid the corner-stone of the First Presbyterian Church at Ridgefarm. 

On August 14, 1909, Right Worshipful Bro. D. D. Darrah, as my 
proxy, laid the corner-stone of the First Christian Church at Tuscola. 

On August 20, 1909, Right Worshipful Bro. H. T. Burnap. as my 
proxy, laid the corner-stone of the new Public School building at Green- 
ville. 

On September 12, 1909, Right Worshipful Bro. A. B. Ashley, as my 
proxy, laid the corner-stone of Marlboro Presbyterian Church, in Chi- 
cago. 



10 



Proceedings of the 



(October 12, 



On September 13, 1909, Bro. Clarence A. Tucker, as my proxy, laid 
the corner-stone of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Findlay. 

Dedications. 

During the year temples and halls for Masonic use have been dedi- 
cated as follows : 

The West Chicago Masonic Temple was dedicated on October 31, 
1908, by Right Worshipful Brother A. B. Ashley, as my proxy. 

On November 24, 1908, the Masonic Hall at Bridgeport was dedi- 
cated by Worshipful Brother J. R. Ennis, as my proxy. 

On January 29, 1909, the Masonic Hall at Latham was dedicated by 
Worshipful Brother Austin H. Scrogin, as my proxy. 

On February 25, 1909, the Masonic Hall at Kingston was dedicated 
by Worshipful Brother James M. .Huff, as my proxy. 

On June 29, 1909, the Masonic Hall at Dawson was dedicated by 
Worshipful Brother Sidney S. Breese, as my proxy. 

On September 9, 1909, the Masonic Hall of Crawford Lodge No. 
666, at Eaton, was dedicated by Worshipful Brother Charles H. Martin, 
as my proxy. 

On October 5, 1909, the Masonic Hall of Chenoa Lodge No. 292, at 
Chenoa, was dedicated by Worshipful Brother Austin H. Scrogin, as my 
proxy. 

On October 9, 1909, I dedicated the Hall of Oak Park Lodge No. 
540, Oak Park. 



Revenue. 

During the year I have issued special dispensations and received 
fees therefor as follows : 



NO. LODGE 

408 Stratton $2 00 



739 Lakeside 

20 Hancock 

888 Damascus .... 

618 Basco 

868 Cornell 

787 Morris 

875 Cornerstone . . 

478 Plieades 

779 Wrights Grove 

806 Nebo 

33 Oriental 

641 Comet 

161 Virden 

448 Yates City . . . 



NO. LODGE 

803 Neponset 

113 Robert Burns . . 
610 Union Park . . . 

567 Frankfort 

321 Dunlap 

864 Olympia 

591 Gilman 

43 Bloomington . . 
164 Edward Dobbins 

57 Trio 

247 Rob Morris . . . 
460 Jeffersonville . . . 

900 Carnation 

182 Germania 

277 Aecordia 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



11 



588 Troy 




787 Morris 




47 Caledonia 




99 Edwardsville .... 




318 J. L. Anderson. .. 




482 Lexington 




277 Accordia 




557 Lessing 




669 Herder 




780 Siloam 




311 Kilwinning 




905 Hanover 




141 Garden City 




427 Red Bud 




653 Greenview 




714 Collison 




206 Fairfield 





2 00 


410 


Mithra 


2 00 


2 00 


674 


Waldeck 


2 00 


2 00 


726 


Golden Rule 


. 2 00 


2 00 


682 


Blue Mound 


. 2 00 


2 00 


895 


Crescent 


2 00 


2 00 


508 


Home 


2 00 


2 00 


23 


Cass 


2 00 


2 00 


416 


Paxton 


2 00 


2 00 


900 


Carnation 


2 00 


2 00 


434 


Makanda 


2 00 


2 00 


827 


Sequoit 


2 00 


2 00 


33 


Oriental 


2 00 


2 00 


134 


Sycamore 


2 00 


2 00 


643 


D. C. Cregier 


2 00 


2 00 


44 


Hardin 


2 00 


2 00 


131 


Golconda 


20 00 


2 00 


739 


Lakeside 


2 00 


2 00 


882 


Boulevard 


2 00 



$153 00 

I also, during the year, have issued dispensations for the organiza- 
tion of new lodges and received fees therefor as follows : 

Elwood Lodge, at Elwood $100 00 

Republic Lodge, at Chicago . 100 00 

Cottonwood Lodge, at Cottonwood 100 00 

Jackson Park Lodge, at Chicago 100 00 

Welcome Lodge, at Chicago 100 00 

Concord Lodge, at Chicago 100 00 

Avondale Lodge, at Chicago 100 00 



$700 00 



Total for dispensations $853 00 

Butler property 233 99 



Total receipts $1,086 99 

All of which has been paid to the Grand Secretary. 



Schools of Instruction. 

According to our custom, Schools of Instruction were held during 
the past winter at five different places in the state as follows : 

At Olney, January 5, 6, 7. 

At Granite City, January 19, 20, 21. 

At Danville, February 2, 3, 4. 

At Aurora, February 16, 17, 18. 

At Rock Island, March 2, 3, 4. 

These Schools were most efficient in serving the purpose for which 
they are held, and they maintained the high character of the schools 



12 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

which this Grand Lodge has been accustomed to hold. Indeed, I am in- 
clined to think as time goes on that our Schools are conducted in better 
style each year. I present herewith as part hereof the report of the 
Board of Grand Examiners. 

Amendment to Constitution. 

At the last session of this Grand Lodge, a proposition to amend 
Clause 9, Section 1, Article 11, of the Constitution was submitted to 
this Grand Lodge, and being seconded by a majority of the representa- 
tives present, was thereby transmitted to the several lodges of the state 
for action. The returns to the Grand Secretary showing the action of 
the constituent lodges, show three hundred and sixty-eight lodges vot- 
ing for the proposition to amend and three hundred and twenty-two 
lodges voting against the proposition to amend, and eighty lodges not 
voting. Under Section 1, Article 16, of the Constitution, a proposed 
amendment must be approved by two-thirds of the lodges. This proposi- 
tion to amend therefore not having received the necessary two-thirds 
vote, I declare to be defeated. 

Foreign Relations. 

Our relations with all other Grand Jurisdictions have been cordial. 
I have had much correspondence with Grand Masters and Grand Secre- 
taries of foreign jurisdictions relating to those matters which ordinarily 
require the attention of the Grand Master, but in every instance the 
correspondence has been most fraternal and there is nothing in our 
foreign relations which I care now to report. 

Committee on Correspondence. 

A few weeks before the decease of Bro. Joseph Robbins I spent a 
day with him and he stated that he found himself unable to complete 
his report to this Grand Lodge. As a result of our conference it was 
agreed that I should request Bro. Edward Cook to assist Brother Rob- 
bins in the work. Brother Cook kindly consented to do this and with 
his accustomed zeal and ability entered upon the work. When Brother 
Robbins departed this life, thus creating a vacancy on this committee, 
I appointed Brother Cook as his successor as committee on correspond- 
ence. 

Corporate Name. 

Pursuant to the action of this Grand Lodge at its last session, I 
put into effect its direction with reference to the change of its corporate 
name, all of which appears specifically and in permanent form in the 
new edition of our Blue Book. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 13 

Grand Representatives Appointed. 

On November 25, 1908, I appointed Bro. H. Edgar Channell as the 
Representative of this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Quebec, 
to succeed Bro. E. E. Rothwell, deceased, who had for many years 
creditably represented this Grand Lodge near that Grand Jurisdiction. 

On December 1, 1908, I appointed Bro. Delbert Green as the Rep- 
resentative of this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of New York, 
to succeed Bro. George H. Klages. This appointment was at the sug- 
gestion of the M.W. Grand Master of New York. 

On December 10, 1908, I appointed Bro. Albert B. Moss as the Rep- 
resentative of this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Idaho, to 
succeed our former Representative near that Grand Lodge, Bro. Stephen 
Dempsey, who had ceased to be a member of any lodge in Idaho. This 
change was made at the suggestion of M.W. Grand Master of Idaho. 

On January 30, 1909, I appoinied Bro. William H. Chaffee, as the 
Representative of this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Georgia, 
to succeed Bro. Thomas H. Carling, who had for several years credit- 
ably represented this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Georgia. 
This change was made purely for personal reasons of my own. Brother 
Chaffee had been for many years an active, zealous Mason and was the 
Master of the lodge at Carlinville when I was made a Mason and gave 
me with painstaking care, my first lessons in this Royal Art. Brother 
Chaffee has been, for a number of years, residing in Georgia and 
has served as Master of his lodge at Tallapoosa in that state and was 
distinguished among the Masons of Georgia. It afforded me great sat- 
isfaction to appoint Bro. Chaffee as our Grand Representative, a com- 
pliment which I am sure he very greatly appreciates. 

On or about July 10, 1909, I appointed Bro. Frank W. Anderson, 
of Waurika, Oklahoma, as the Representative of this Grand Lodge near 
the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma. This appointment was made upon the 
recommendation of Bro. H. L. Muldrow, M.W. Grand Master of the 
consolidated Grand Lodges of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. 

Charters Renewed. 

Caledonia Lodge No. 47, located at Olmstead, Illinois, having lost 
its charter by fire, I caused a duplicate charter to issue to it on January 
27, 1909, without fee. 

Kinderhook Lodge No. 353, located at Kinderhook, Illinois, having 
lost its charter by fire, I, on June 8, 1909, caused a duplicate charter to 
issue to it without fee. 



14 Proceedings of the (October 12. 

Grand Chaplain Appointed. 

During the spring of the present year, Bro. Abraham Traugott, 
Right Worshipful Grand Chaplain of this Grand Lodge, removed from 
Springfield, where he had for many years resided. By reason of some 
unfortunate circumstances which I will not now pause to narrate, Bro. 
Traugott was suspended from that lodge for non-payment of dues. A 
vacancy was thereby occasioned in the office of Grand Chaplain. Ac- 
cordingly, I appointed as Right Worshipful Grand Chaplain of this 
Grand Lodge, Bro. J. Webster Bailey, of Ottawa, Illinois, a member of 
Humboldt Lodge No. 555, of Ottawa, and at a stated communication of 
that lodge held on the evening of July 23, A. D. 1909, Bro. Bailey was 
duly installed as Right Worshipful Grand Chaplain of this Grand Lodge 
by Bro. S. B. Bradford, acting as my proxy. 

Grand Orator Installed. 

It will be remembered that at the last session of this Grand Lodge 
Bro. Euclid B. Rogers was appointed Right Worshipful Grand Orator 
of this Grand Lodge, but was not present in this Grand Lodge to be 
installed. On October 26, 1908, Bro. Euclid B. Rogers was installed as 
Right Worshipful Grand Orator of this Grand Lodge in St. Paul's Lodge 
No. 500, in Springfield, Illinois, by Bro. S. S. Breese, acting as my proxy. 

Grand Steward Installed. 

Bro. William B. Grimes was appointed at the last session of this 
Grand Lodge Worshipful Grand Steward, but not then being in attend- 
ance, could not be installed. I issued to Bro. Roy D. Plattner, of Pitts- 
field, my proxy to install Brother Grimes as Worshipful Grand Steward. 
The health of Brother Grimes made it impossible for him to be installed 
until September 13, 1909, when he was duly installed by Brother Plattner 
as my proxy, in Pittsfield Lodge No. 790, as Worshipful Grand Steward. 

Questions Brought Over From Last Year. 

I discovered after the last session of this Grand Lodge had closed 
and when its Proceedings had been printed, that several matters men- 
tioned in my address at that session of this Grand Lodge and which I 
thought ought to be considered by this Grand Lodge, by an oversight on 
the part of the Committee on Grand Master's Address, had been entirely 
overlooked. I did not notice the omission until I read the printed pro- 
ceedings. 

The action which I reported with reference to the removal of Mur- 
rayville Lodge No". 432, from Murrayville to Woodson, in Morgan county, 
Illinois, was neither approved or disaffirmed. 



1909 -) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 15 

It will be remembered that in my last annual address I gave special 
attention to the question of "Dispensations issued and denied." Be- 
cause of the character of the questions presented, I felt that this Grand 
Lodge should either approve what I had done as reported or disavow 
the views there expressed. This entire subject matter was wholly omit- 
ted from the report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address. 

What was said by me under the head of "Appeals to Grand Lodge" 
was not considered. This subject was referred to the Committee on 
Appeals but that Committee perhaps not being advised that it was so 
referred to them, failed to make any report on it. 

These several subjects I regard as of such importance that they ought 
to be considered by this Grand Lodge and I therefore now respectfully 
ask that what I said under those heads in my last annual address, inas- 
much as they have been neither approved nor disapproved, may be now 
referred to the proper committees of this Grand Lodge and receive such 
attention as in your opinion they merit. 

Necrology. 

The year now ending has brought severe affliction to this Grand 
Lodge and the world of Masonry is poorer as a result. Many distin- 
guished brethren of this and foreign jurisdictions have been summoned 
to a better world. I leave for our Committee on Obituaries the mourn- 
ful task of making suitable mention of their decease and of paying 
proper tribute to their memory. Five of the past officers of this Grand 
Lodge have departed this life during the past year. 



JOSEPH ROBBINS. 

On July 19, 1909, at Quincy, where he had lived for many years, 
our venerable, distinguished and beloved brother, Joseph Robbins, weary 
of the burdens which he bore, laid himself down to rest. Brother Rob- 
bins' pre-eminence among the Masons of Illinois was ungrudgingly ac- 
knowledged by all. For nearly fifty years he has been a prominent and 
ofttimes a dominant factor in this Grand Lodge. He was born at Leo- 
minster, Massachusetts, September 12, 1834, and was made a Mason at 
that place. He became a member of Quincy Lodge No. 296, December 
16, 1859, and was its Master from 1S63 to 1869, inclusive, and again in 
1880. Brother Robbins was first in this Grand Lodge at its session in 
1862, and served as a member of the Committee on Lodges Under Dis- 
pensation. From that date he attended every session of this Grand 
Lodge up to and including that of 1908, except that in 1861. although 
Master of his lodge, he was for some reason not present in (his Grand 



16 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Lodge. In 1863, he served on the Committee on Grand Master's Ad- 
dress. He served as Grand Orator in 1869, as Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Obituaries in 1870, as Chairman of the Committee on Cor- 
respondence in 1871. At the session of 1871 he was elected Junior Grand 
Warden and was regularly advanced until 1876, when he became 
Grand Master, and was re-elected in 1877. He served as the Committee 
on Correspondence in 1879. He served as Chairman of the Committee 
on Jurisprudence in 1880 and also as Committee on Correspondence. In 
1881 he became Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence, and served 
in that position each year until 1888 when he again, for the third time, 
became the Committee on Correspondence, and served in that position 
until life's work was done. 

He was laid to rest in the hillside at Quincy on the banks of the 
Mississippi on July 21, 1909. I convened an emergent Grand Lodge and 
conducted the services at the grave according to our Masonic usage. A 
great number of brethren of Quincy and of other parts of the state 
were present and joined in paying a last sad tribute of respect to our 
deceased brother. Deputy Grand Master Ashley, Grand Secretary Cut- 
ter, Senior Grand Deacon Whipple and Grand Tyler Gurney were pres- 
ent and assisted in our melancholy duty. Past Grand Masters Crawford, 
Scott and Allen were present and assisted. 

The position of Joseph Robbins in the Masonic world was unique. 
In this Grand Lodge he stood for nearly half a century, like a light- 
house on the hill, to warn us of dangers on the way and to guide us 
into peaceful harbors. His work as our Correspondence Committee has 
commanded recognition from the world of Masonry, and his writings 
have become classics in the literature of our craft. He stood always for 
the dignity and pre-eminence of Ancient Craft Masonry. He was wise 
in counsel, fearless in the advocacy of what he thought to be right. He 
was forceful and convincing in his public utterances. Among the Ma- 
sonic writers of his age, he stood a*s Saul of Israel among his fellows, 
head and shoulders above them all. 

While all good men join in the lamentations of his friends, yet his 
decease is not to be regarded as in anywise a calamity to him. It is not 
obliteration but change, not extinction but exhaltation. While we mourn 
for the loss we have all sustained, he no doubt exults that he has shaken 
off the shackles of mortality. Joseph Robbins lives. The physical form 
which we knew and through which alone he could reach us, moulders in 
its parent dust, but his genial, courtly spirit has not abdicated its ac- 
customed place in this Grand Lodge. He is with us now, but we being 
enmeshed in these earthly bodies cannot apprehend his spiritual presence. 
We need not mourn as those who are without hope. We knew that he 
would die and that we shall die. To die is the natural end of life. That 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 17 

we should live at all is an inexplicable mystery. That we should die is 
natural and inevitable. Why need any man shrink from death? It is 
the certainty of death that gives dignity to life. If death were not in 
prospect for us all this life would be insipid and meaningless. The 
beasts of the field die even as we do, but they know not that they shall 
die. and therefore are but brutes. Without death before us, life could 
have no goal, no objective. There could be in it nothing ultimate. If 
Almighty God should at this moment by His divine decree, exempt all 
humanity henceforth from the dominion of death, we would enter upon 
a period of retrogression, and soon lapse into barbarism. There would 
be no incentive for improvement or for right doing. The certainty of 
death moderates the severity of tyrants. It mitigates avarice. It loosens 
the purse strings of the miser. It humanizes and deifies us all. With- 
out death there could be no dividing and dissipating of colossal for- 
tunes through the laws of inheritance, no limit to the accelerating power 
of the strong and the rich. It is the immutable certainty of death, and 
the knowledge that we must die, that give zest and dignity and meaning 
and sweetness to life and lift us into kinship with God. 

Joseph Robbins is dead, 'tis true. There is none to take his place 
here, 'tis true. But his life, his teachings, his example, are an open book 
before us. We can best honor him by steadfastly keeping in the paths 
along which he led us. Doth any man conceive that the voice of Joseph 
Robbins shall be heard here no more? Nay, verily I say unto you. that 
here, now and hereafter, in every season of stress, he shall speak to us 
like a voice crying out in the wilderness to make darkness light before 
us and crooked things straight. Brethren, a great and good brother has 
gone on before. He stands upon the heights beyond with hands cut- 
stretched in loving benediction on us all. 

LOYAL L. MUNN. 

Brother Munn was born in the State of New York on September 1. 
A. D. 1S29. He moved to Freeport. Illinois, on June 6. A. D. 1846, 
where he continuously resided until his decease, on November 23. A. D. 
1903. 

Brother Munn was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason in 
Excelsior Lodge No. 97, on October 27, A. D. 1S53. He was a charter 
member of Moses R. Thompson Lodge No. 3S1. which was afterwards 
consolidated with Excelsior Lodge No. 97, in which he served as Master 
for a number of years. 

Brother Munn served as R.W. Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge 

from 1SS1 to 1893, and became widely known among the craft of this 
Grand Jurisdiction. All who knew him loved him. and nearly all the 



18 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

brethren in Illinois knew him. "He enriched his mind abundantly in a 
general knowledge of things." He was conscientious, intelligent and 
painstaking in the discharge of every duty. He was in his life and 
character an exemplar of the teachings of our venerable institution, and 
taught the world the worth and dignity of true Masonic manhood. What- 
soever his hand found to do he did well. His cheery voice and radiant 
countenance brought bright sunshine to all who met him. His work is 
done, therefore our Supreme Grand Master hath called him home. 

While we mourn his loss, which to us is irreparable, yet we are 
cheered and sustained by the fond remembrance of his Masonic work and 
worth. While we have consigned his body to the dust whence it came, 
his memory is cherished in the hearts of nearly one hundred thousand 
Masons of Illinois. 

RICHARD S. DEMENT. 

Bro. Richard S. Dement was laid to rest on October 13, 1908. He 
was made a Mason in Lexington Lodge No. 482, in 1870, and was Master 
thereof in 1881. He dimitted from that lodge in 1885 and thereafter 
lived in the city of Chicago. He was a Masonic author of note and 
served as surveyor general in Utah Territory under the administration 
of President Cleveland. Brother Dement served as Grand Orator of this 
Grand Lodge in the year 1877. 

I regret that I am not able to furnish a fuller account of this broth- 
er's life and works. 

HIRAM W. THOMAS. 

On August 12, 1909, Bro. Hiram W. Thomas departed this life in 
Florida. Brother Thomas became a member of Thomas J. Turner Lodge 
No. 409, December 16, 1875. He was Grand Chaplain of this Grand 
Lodge in 1886, 1887, 1888,. 1903, 1904, and was appointed in 1906 but 
not installed. He served in this important position not only accept- 
ably but with distinction. Brother Thomas was lovable in his dis- 
position, and was cherished in private life by all who knew him. 
He was endowed with such measure of intellectual ability that he 
readily attained honorable distinction among men everywhere and par- 
ticularly in his chosen work. Brother Thomas, with an ability which 
would have won wealth and distinction in any calling, turned his back 
upon the frivolities of the world and went among men as a minister of 
the most High God proclaiming the glad tidings of salvation to all. This 
brother had attained the age of seventy-seven years at the time of his 
decease. He was laid to rest at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, by loving 
friends and brethren. He wrought faithfully while he lived and now 
enjoys that rest and reward which faithful and efficient service always 
bring. 



1909-) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 19 



HEXRY ALOXZO EIDSON. 

This distinguished brother was made a Master Mason October 7. 
1565, and died on the anniversary of his birth. October 7, 1909. Brother 
Eidson was a faithful and zealous Mason. He had served his lodge in 
various capacities and was its Master for many years. He became Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Master in 1905 and served in that capacity until his 
life's work was done. 

Brother Eidson was a leader among the Masons in his part of the 
state and his valuable service to the craft has given him a warm place 
in the hearts of all the brethren. 

CALENDAR ROHRBOUGH. 

This venerable brother was born in West Virginia September 1, 
1S34. He removed to Illinois in 1S57. He served his country bravely 
during the Civil War. and became a captain in the United States army. 
After the war he settled in Kinmundy. He was made a Master Mason 
in Kinmundy Lodge Xo. 398, October 21. 1567. He was Master of that 
lodge from 1SS9 to 1894. He filled many places of distinction in his com- 
munity and was respected by all who knew him. He departed this life 
at Kinmundy on September 11. 1909. He was laid to rest on September 
14, 1909. with the impressive ceremonies of our ancient craft. 

Brother Rohrbough became Worshipful Grand Steward in this Grand 
Lodge in 1903, and served with dignity in that position until he left this 
life of labor. Brother Rohrbough was loved by all good people while 
he lived and is now mourned by all his survivors who knew him. This 
Grand Lodge will miss him. His honorable and exemplary life is an 
inspiration and in some degree a solace to those who survive him. 

New Lodges. 

It will be remembered that at the last session of this Grand Lodge 
I discussed at some length the condition of our law with reference to the 
formation of new lodges. I desire now in the light of fuller experience 
to supplement what was then said by calling attention to the provision 
in Section 2, Article 13, of the Constitution, which provides in effect that 
outside of cities having three or more lodges, no new lodge can be 
formed without the recommendation of the three nearest lodges. What 
I said last year touching the question of the organization of new lodges 
was referred to a special committee which is to report at this s 
and I suggest that what I now say be referred to the same committee. 

I have become convinced that exceptional cases arise where there 
ought to be a power somewhere to authorize the formation of a new 



20 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

lodge outside of cities having three or more lodges without the consent 
of the three nearest lodges. The rule requiring this consent is whole- 
some and ordinarily works no injustice. Cases, however, do arise, where, 
because of the shifting of centers of population, the decadence of an 
ancient village and the upbuilding of a neighboring town, a lodge located 
at the ancient village in an early day may from local pride or jealousy 
refuse to give consent to the formation of a new lodge in the more pros- 
perous neighborhood. I am firmly of the opinion that that provision of 
the constitution ought to be amended in some way so that there shall be 
a power somewhere, either in the Grand Master or elsewhere, to author- 
ize the formation of a lodge in these exceptional cases, even though one 
of the three nearest lodges refuses to consent. When two of the three 
nearest lodges consent but one of the three nearest refuses consent, it 
might be wise to give the Grand Master authority to issue his dispensa- 
tion to remove the place of meeting of the lodge not consenting to the 
place where it is desired to form the new lodge. This would not require 
an amendment to the constitution. 

I do not specify in what particular form I think such amendment 
ought to come, because this entire subject matter is referred to a com- 
mittee whose wisdom will doubtless be sufficient to frame such amend- 
ment as may be suitable, provided they think that any amendment tend- 
ing in this direction ought to be adopted. 

Corner- Stones. 

I have been so much occupied during the past year that most of the 
work in the laying of corner-stones and dedication of temples, has been 
done by my proxies. There are two questions connected with the laying 
of corner-stones which I think it wise to lay before this Grand Lodge 
for such action, if any, as it may deem proper. 

I assume that the directions printed in our book of Ceremonies are 
to be regarded as the law in each case. I submit to you the question 
whether it might be wise more definitely to specify the character of the 
"public structures or buildings" whose corner-stones may be laid with 
Masonic honors. A very small school house in an obscure country dis- 
trict is a public building as much so as high school buildings in a large 
city. A very small church in an obscure hamlet is as much a public 
building as a great cathedral in the largest city. Grand Lodge Officers 
do not attend such ceremonies where the building is insignificant or the 
locality obscure, and it does not make a good impression upon the public 
or upon the fraternity to have the ceremony conducted in large part by 
officers pro tern who have never before officiated in their respective 
places, and where the ceremony must almost unavoidably be lacking in 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 21 

that dignity and impressiveness which ought to characterize it. I desire 
only to suggest whether it would be wise or practicable to specify some- 
thing as to the character of the public building whose corner-stone may 
be laid with Masonic ceremonies. 

It is provided also in our Book of Ceremonies at page 55, that "The 
corner-stone should have engraved on its face the words 'Laid by the 
Masonic Fraternity,' with the date, the year of Masonry, the name of the 
Grand Master, and such other particulars as may be deemed proper." 
It has sometimes happened in laying a corner-stone that the inscription 
was omitted by those who prepared the stone, not knowing that the same 
was required. Where such an omission was innocently made and not 
known until the time of laying the stone, nothing was said about the 
omission and the ceremony proceeded. But learning something from 
experience, in every instance during the past year when asked to lay a 
corner-stone, I have written that the stone must be inscribed according 
to the direction of our Book of Ceremonies. And where such inscrip- 
tion was not made after proper notice that it was required, I have 
declined to lay the stone and in one case where I wrote what was re- 
quired in this particular in ample time for the stone to be suitably pre- 
pared, and where there developed opposition to the inscription being 
placed there, and by reason of which it was not placed on the stone, 
notwithstanding many brethren solicited that the stone be laid, I stead- 
fastly declined to permit the laying of the stone with Masonic ceremony. 
The name of the Grand Master I do not regard as important, but the 
inscription that it was laid by this Grand Lodge I regard as vital. 

I report this question to the Grand Lodge that the Grand Lodge may 
say whether the directions in the Book of Ceremonies that the stone shall 
be so inscribed, shall be regarded as vital or as something which may be 
waived or adopted at pleasure. The point that I make is that while I 
would not refuse to lay a stone that did not have the inscription on it 
if there had been no notice that such inscription was necessary, yet where 
there is a plain refusal to make the inscription after particular notice 
of its necessity, then I have felt that if they wanted the Grand Lodge to 
lay the corner-stone, but were unwilling then and thereafter to acknowl- 
edge and state to the world that it was so laid, I would not in such case 
lay the stone or authorize it to be done. 

Bonds of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer. 

It will be remembered that in the closing minutes of the last Grand 
Lodge, I called attention to the fact that under the by-law of this Grand 
Lodge, the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary are required to give 
surety company bonds and that the bonds which had been presented to 



Proceedings of the (October 12, 



me one year before for approval were in such form and contained such 
covenants that I would not approve the same. I reported that the surety 
companies with which the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary had 
been accustomed to deal, had shuffled and evaded in a variety of cunning 
ways to avoid giving a bond which would be really effective in form and 
that because of such failure, I had been compelled to let matters run 
without any bond for quite awhile. The failure to give the bond was in 
no sense the fault of our Grand Officers. Either of them no doubt 
could have given a good bond with personal security, but under the by- 
law, they were required to give a surety company bond. And the surety 
company, knowing that we had to take their bond, or none, took advan- 
tage of the situation by seeking to put into the bonds, covenants which 
practically exempted them from liability and which I would not approve. 
The surety company with which we were dealing finally did sign the 
bonds in the form in which I had drawn them, but we have had the 
same trouble since the last Grand Lodge, not quite so protracted, but I 
am thoroughly convinced that we ought not to deal with surety com- 
panies at all and that the by-law of this Grand Lodge ought to require 
that the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary give bonds with good 
personal security. I never saw any real estate or any property owned 
by any surety company. I am not satisfied of their solvency. They no- 
doubt ordinarily pay when they have to, but my experience with them 
has convinced me that if they can palm off upon their customer a bond 
which reads in large letters that they are liable, but in smaller print 
puts in a lot of conditions which exempts them from liability, they will 
do it. The ordinary surety company is merely a handsome desk, in a 
handsome office, with a smooth talking gentleman on one side of the 
desk and a sucker on the other. I do not hesitate to say that I person- 
ally would much rather take a bond signed by responsible individuals 
who have good real estate and tangible property that I can see, than to 
take a bond signed by a surety company whose assets none of us has 
seen and whose solvency must very largely appear upon printed state- 
ments of its assets or upon the representation of its agents. I therefore 
recommend that our by-law be so amended as to require the Grand Treas- 
urer and Grand Secretary to give bonds with good personal security. 

Questions Decided.. 

During the year past many questions have been submitted to me for 
determination. In some instances the questions were important in their 
immediate results, but were not new or novel and need not therefore 
be reported. 

One of the most astonishing things about officers of lodges through- 
out the state is that so many of them know very little and some of them 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 23 

nothing about Masonic law. I am pleased to state that many lodge offi- 
cers are well informed. I have found officers of lodges who did not 
know that there was such a thing as our Blue Book. We have devoted 
a great deal of time and attention to the teaching of our ritual and great 
interest and enthusiasm have been aroused among our lodge officers and 
Masons generally throughout the state to become proficient in the ritual. 
Our Board of Grand Examiners and our Grand Lecturers and a large 
number of other brethren have created a degree of proficiency in the 
work in this state, which in my opinion is not exceeded in any state in 
the union. But we have given no attention to the teaching of Masonic 
law. The Standard Club, of Chicago, which has done so much in dis- 
seminating the knowledge of the correct work, during the past year has 
been devoting an occasional evening to the study of Masonic law. One 
of its members wrote me inquiring whether there would be any objection 
to their doing this. I was very glad to reply promptly not only that 
there was no objection, but that it was a highly commendable thing for 
them to do. I do not know what is the corrective for the condition of 
which I speak, but while we are insisting on Masters of lodges and lodge 
officers learning the standard work and doing it accurately and well, it 
is of equal importance, indeed of greater importance, that lodge officers 
have a correct understanding of Masonic law. Our Blue Book is a very 
small volume. It can be read carefully and intelligently in a very short 
time. It ought to be read often by every lodge officer and could be read 
with profit by every Mason. The Master of the lodge ought to be so 
familiar with its contents that he would know whenever a question is 
presented in his lodge or elsewhere, whether there is anything in the 
Blue Book touching that question and he ought to be able to find it in 
the Blue Book promptly. It is really disheartening to reflect upon the 
startling want of knowledge as to Masonic law on the part of some of 
our lodge officers. 

During the past year I have received hundreds of inquiries as to 
matters which manifested inexcusable ignorance on the part of the 
brethren writing me. For instance, I have been asked whether when the 
room under a lodge room is rented for a saloon, there is any law which 
requires that the lodge must move its quarters. 

I have been asked whether it would be proper for a lodge to accept 
the petition for membership of a Syrian who has been in this country a 
number of years but has not yet taken out naturalization papers. 

I have been asked whether a lodge, in order to purchase a lot 
whereon to build a Masonic Hall, must be incorporated as an association. 

It has been complained to me by the Master of a lodge that one of 
the Wardens of his lodge had in different cases countermanded the Mas- 



24 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

ter's order for a special meeting. And in the same letter I was asked 
whether the Warden had the right to call a communication of the lodge 
without the consent of the Master and over his objection. 

I have been asked what proceedings should be instituted against a 
brother who boldly asserts in public that a certain other brother has 
done more to cause disturbance in the last two elections than all other 
forces combined. 

I have received complaint that some members of a lodge have en- 
couraged or assisted a barber in opening a shop in a town where the 
brother complaining lived who was also a barber, so that there thus be- 
came two barber shops in the town instead of one, and I am asked 
whether charges might be preferred against the brethren who assisted the 
second barber in locating in the town. 

I have been asked whether a lodge may accept the petition to be 
made a Mason of a man who owns property that he has leased for sa- 
loon purposes. 

I have received several letters from lodges and lodge officers inquir- 
ing the name and address of their District Deputy. 

I have been written to by lodge officers that a member of a lodge had 
applied for a dimit but that they wanted to keep him in the lodge and 
they wanted to know whether they might induce him to continue his 
membership in the lodge on condition that he be charged for Grand 
Lodge dues only. 

I have been asked by letter whether a member of a lodge might vote 
in lodge by proxy. 

I have been asked whether the Master of a lodge on making a de- 
cision could be required to take the vote of the lodge as to the correct- 
ness of his ruling. 

I have been solicited to assist lodge officers in the sale of their own 
real estate. 

I have had one lodge give Masonic burial to a Fellowcraft. 

In short, I have been asked hundreds and hundreds of questions 
which betray the most unmistakable and lamentable ignorance of Ma- 
sonic law on the part of the writers. I am pleased to state that while 
my Masonic correspondence during the past year has been very volumin- 
ous and hundreds of real questions have been decided and a great many 
ugly complications in lodges and with lodge officers have been satisfac- 
torily adjusted, there has been in every instance a cordial and loyal 
acquiescence on the part of the officers and members in the determina- 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 25 

tions of the Grand Master. But one case has arisen during the past year 
which I have concluded I ought to report to this Grand Lodge. 

The Liquor Question. 

In a variety of forms the question has been presented to me for de- 
termination as to the attitude of this Grand Lodge touching various 
phases of the liquor question. And in an acute form the question came 
to me from Clinton Lodge No. 19, of Petersburg. 

In this case Bro. Elzie M. Combs, a member of that lodge, petitioned 
for a dimit. Brother Combs was living in Beardstown. When his peti- 
tion for dimit came to the lodge or when it was known that it was to 
come before the lodge, charges were preferred against him. The charge 
was "Unmasonic Conduct." The specifications were "1st. Violating Ma- 
sonic Obligation." "2nd. Violating Article 9, Section 1, of By-laws of 
Clinton Lodge No. 19, A.F. and A.M., relating to saloons." This is the 
exact language of the charge and specifications. The by-law upon which 
such charge and specifications were predicated, reads as follows : "Any 
Mason residing in this jurisdiction, whether affiliated or unaffiliated, who 
shall be found guilty of being engaged in a saloon or tipling shop for 
the sale of spirituous liquors, wines or any other article of drink cal- 
culated to produce intoxication (except it be as a bona fide hotel keeper 
or druggist) or keeping or frequenting a gaming house of any kind, 
shall be deemed guilty of unmasonic conduct and shall be punished by 
reprimand, suspension or expulsion as the lodge may deem proper." 

In this case the lodge proceeded and found the defendant guilty and 
indefinitely suspended him from all the rights and privileges of Ma- 
sonry. Before the trial, however, my attention had been called to the 
matter, but I learned nothing more of it until after the final action of 
the lodge had been taken as above given. On learning what had been 
done I set aside the action of the lodge in indefinitely suspending Brother 
Combs and ordered that dimit issue to him unless other charges were 
preferred. My action in setting aside the action of the lodge I felt to 
be not only proper but unavoidable because, first, the charges and speci- 
fications charged him with no offence whatever. To say that he violated 
his Masonic obligation without saying wherein or by what manner of 
conduct he did so, is to state nothing. The second specification that he 
violated Article 9, Section 1, of the By-laws of Clinton Lodge, relating 
to saloons, charged nothing. And moreover, a remarkable thing about 
this by-law is that it does not profess to have any reference to the con- 
duct of any Mason even its own members who reside without the juris- 
diction of the lodge, as the language of the by-law itself is, "Any Ma- 
son residing in this jurisdiction, whether affiliated or unaffiliated, who 
shall be found guilty of being engaged in a saloon," etc. 



26 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

I report this case to this Grand Lodge not because I conceive there 
can be any difference of opinion as to the duty of the Grand Master to 
set aside a conviction in the case, but because it involves in a somewhat 
acute form, the question as to whether a constituent lodge may disci- 
pline its members by suspension or expulsion for engaging in the busi- 
ness of keeping a licensed saloon. I need not say that I am not here 
as a defender or apologist for the business, but, we are taught that it is 
our duty to pay a due obedience to the laws under whose protection we 
live. The keeping of a licensed saloon is an entirely lawful business in 
Illinois. And Masonry in Illinois does not undertake to proscribe that 
which is lawful in Illinois. I have in a number of cases under by-laws 
somewhat similar to this, decided that while the keeping of a saloon is 
not a Masonic offense because it is not the violation of any law either of 
the state or of Masonry, yet, a saloon may be so kept that it does vio- 
late municipal law as well as the law of Masonry. If a saloonkeeper sell 
to minors or keep open on Sunday, those sales are in violation of law. 
The license to the saloonkeeper gives him no protection as to such sales, 
and if the charge against a Mason were that being the keeper of a li- 
censed saloon, he did these unlawful things, I have held that that would 
be a sufficient charge. I have in some cases decided that a charge might 
be framed in this form ; that a defendant being the keeper of a licensed 
saloon, so kept and conducted the same that it became a place of notori- 
ous disorder, frequented by lawless characters, and that the defendant 
being generally known in the community to be a Mason, that the knowl- 
edge that he is a Mason and the notoriously disreputable character of 
his saloon, tend to bring Masonry into disrepute. But in this Clinton 
Lodge case, nothing of the kind was claimed as is observed. Some of 
the members of Clinton Lodge No. 19, seemed to be very much surprised 
at my attitude on this question and in an entirely respectful manner ex- 
pressed the desire that the question might be definitely determined by this 
Grand Lodge. 

The question is not an open one here. In 1885, an effort was made in 
this Grand Lodge to amend its by-laws so as to provide that for a Mason 
to become engaged in the sale of intoxicating liquor, should be deemed 
unmasonic conduct and punished accordingly. The proposition to amend 
was defeated. I wrote the brethren of Clinton Lodge and have written 
in a number of other cases touching these questions that while Masonry 
regards no man for his worldly wealth or honors, neither does it dis- 
criminate between men as to their nationality or their business. We 
judge of the individual man, and if that man has become a Mason and 
is observing the laws of the state in which he lives, he cannot be pro- 
scribed, punished or in any wise disciplined for doing that which the 
laws of his state expressly license him to do, unless some by-law of this 
Grand Lodge expressly forbids it. If Clinton Lodge might exclude the 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 27 

saloonkeeper, other lodges might exclude other classes of business men, 
or certain races or nationalities, and it is inconceivable to me that a 
member of my lodge residing in the jurisdiction of Clinton Lodge might 
be expelled for conduct which is not violative of any law of this Grand 
Lodge 01 of his own lodge. 

I decided in this case of Clinton Lodge No. 19, that the by-law in 
question in so far as it related to the sale of liquor was wholly void, 
and I respectfully report my action and decision in this case to this 
Grand Lodge that it may receive such consideration as you may think 
proper. 

How to Vote ox a [Motion to Suspend. 

During the 3-ear the question has ccme to me from several parts of 
the state as to how the vote should be taken on a motion to suspend for 
non-payment of dues. The Grand Lodge By-Law, Section 5, Article 8, 
Part 3, provides that the vote shall be by ballot. It has happened in sev- 
eral cases that the vote was taken either by show of hands or by a ris- 
ing vote and the requisite two-thirds majority being ascertained to be in 
favor of the motion to suspend, the defendant was in each case declared 
to be suspended from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. 

It has been claimed to me by some members of the lodge that inas- 
much as, under the by-law, the only proper way to vote on such a mo- 
tion is by ballot, a vote taken in any other way is necessarily invalid 
and that a result thus reached is likewise invalid. In the cases which 
have come to me, no objection was made at the time as to the manner 
in which the vote was taken. I have felt constrained to hold in all such 
cases that the only proper way in which to vote on a motion to suspend 
for non-payment of dues, is by ballot, but in a case where it is admitted 
that the circumstances justified suspension; that the defendant was de- 
linquent; that proper notices had been given and that a motion to sus- 
pend was duly made and seconded, and the question put to a vote and 
two-thirds of those present voted in favor of the motion to suspend, 
and the result entered on the minutes of the meeting, and no brother 
present objected to the Master as to the manner in which the vote was 
taken; that in all such cases, the result thus ascertained is valid. I have 
declined in every instance to interfere in any wise with the result thus 
obtained. I have held that an unauthorized method of ascertaining the 
majority, will not invalidate the result, provided the facts justify the 
action, and no objection was made at the time as to the manner in which 
the vote was taken. 

I think it must be admitted that if the Grand Master might properly 
set aside the action of the lodge in suspending a brother for non-payment 
of dues merely on the ground that the vote was taken by a rising vote 



28 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

instead of by ballot, then he might with equal propriety set aside any 
result thus reached at any time in the past. I do not believe that such a 
view is sound. I think the purpose of the proceeding is to do justice to 
the defendant and to the lodge. It is to enforce the discipline of the 
lodge and to put a stress upon the membership of the lodge to discharge 
their Masonic obligations, and so long as it is not denied that the condi- 
tions justify the result, I should not be inclined to hold that the method 
by which the result was reached is of the essence of the proceeding. 

I report these conclusions because in some cases where I have made 
such holding, I have been advised that some of the brethren question the 
correctness of my decision. To set aside the result merely on the ground 
that the vote was taken by a show of hands or by a rising vote 
instead of a ballot, when no other ground of complaint exists and 
the justice of the result is not questioned, would be, in my opinion, 
to sacrifice the substance of the proceeding to a matter of form. I 
have, of course, in every instance held that the only proper way to 
vote on such a question is by ballot and have never intimated that 
any other method was permissible, but the question which I make is that 
when the vote has been taken in another way without objection or com- 
plaint by anybody at the time, and a result has been reached, whose jus- 
tice is not questioned, I would not think of invalidating the result be- 
cause of the manner in which the vote was taken. 

Our Masonic Homes. 

I am pleased to report that our two Homes, the Home at Sullivan, 
and the Orphans' Home at Chicago, have been conducted during the past 
year in a manner satisfactory to our Board of Trustees and which we 
believe is satisfactory to all our Craft who know conditions, methods 
and results. These great institutions have been conducted without any 
unusual trouble or difficulty. The sickness and mortality at the Old 
Folks' Home is always high and the expense of maintenance at that 
Home is very much greater per capita than at the Orphans' Home, for 
the reason that the members of that Home being all of them aged, are 
almost totally incapacitated from rendering any valuable services for the 
benefit of the Home. Being aged and constantly subject to the ail- 
ments incident to age, they require a large amount of attention. In 
sickness they require constant nursing, while the members of the Or- 
phans' Home being young, the rate of mortality there is practically noth- 
ing and the cost of maintenance per capita very greatly less than at the 
Old Folks' Home. 

I do not care at this time to consider at any length anything per- 
taining to the management of these Homes, except I desire to repeat in 
sentiment all that I said touching their value in my last annual address. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 29 

I take pleasure in stating that the members of the Board of Trustees dur- 
ing the past year have administered the affairs of these institutions with 
fidelity and success. There has not been the least friction in the work- 
ings of this Board of Trustees. There has been practically no division 
of opinion among the members as to any matter of importance and this 
Grand Lodge is to be congratulated that the Board has been so har- 
monious and efficient. The craft of this great Jurisdiction is under great 
obligation to all the members of this Board of Trustees for the fidelity 
and efficiency with which they have administered these great trusts. I 
am heartily rejoiced that an amendment to the by-laws is pending in this 
Grand Lodge to fix the status of members of the Board as that of 
members of standing committees in this Grand Lodge, so that they may 
attend the sessions of this Grand Lodge and receive mileage and per 
diem the same as members of other standing committees. 



The Orphans' Home. 

At the last annual communication of this Grand Lodge, I reported 
that by authority of the Grand Lodge, I had conveyed the Orphans' 
Home property in Chicago for the sum of thirty-five thousand dollars. 
It thereupon became necessary that a new site for the Orphans' Home 
be selected and at the last communication of this Grand Lodge, an ap- 
propriation of twenty thousand dollars was made for the purchase of 
such a site and for the permanent improvement of the grounds pur- 
chased and the preparation of plans and specifications for the erection of 
a fire proof building which would be adequate to meet the requirements 
of an Orphans' Home. 

It was directed by the Grand Lodge that the site chosen should be 
approved by a majority of the Trustees of the Illinois Masonic Homes. 
From and after the close of the last annual communication of this Grand 
Lodge, the members of the Board of Trustees were vigilant in their ef- 
forts to choose a suitable site for the Home, and indeed before the last 
annual meeting, the members of the Board residing in Chicago had given 
the matter considerable attention and had examined several prospective 
sites. By the middle of December last, the Chicago members of the 
Board of Trustees had examined a number of sites in and near Chicago 
and those members on the Board not residing in Chicago, namely. 
Brothers Scott, Berks, Steele and the Grand Master, went to Chicago 
and examined a number of sites in various localities near Chicago and 
last of all examined a site at LaGrange, which is a suburb of Chicago, 
and which site the Chicago members of the Board had agreed was the 
best available site. Those of us who had not seen the LaGrange site, 
went to examine it and as a result of such examination, the Board of 



30 Proceedings of the (October 12. 

Trustees unanimously agreed that that site was satisfactory and was the 
most desirable of all available. That result having happily been ob- 
tained by the unanimous vote of all the members of the Board, I pro- 
ceeded actively to acquire title to that property. The property at LaGrange 
consists of the half of a very large city block, which block had form- 
erly been divided into two actual blocks so that practically the property 
chosen is a block consisting of nineteen lots, which were owned by dif- 
ferent parties and it became necessary to conduct negotiations with several 
different parties. Without now troubling the Grand Lodge to go into 
details, it is sufficient to say that after the usual amount of time and 
trouble spent in the examination of titles and conducting negotiations in 
my name as purchaser the property was at last conveyed to me by sev 
eral different deeds and by me conveyed to this Grand Lodge, and this 
Grand Lodge is now the owner of all of the property so selected by 
the Board of Trustees. The property being lots eighteen to thirty-six 
inclusive, in block fifteen, in Leiter's Third Addition to LaGrange. This 
property is located in one of the most beautiful suburbs of Chicago. It 
is a beautiful piece of ground, quite high, and in the opinion of the 
Board of Trustees, peculiarly suitable for the purposes for which it is 
intended. The cost of this property was $11,600. And in this connection, 
I desire further to report that at the request of the Trustees of the 
Homes, and in order to enable them to have some preliminary work done 
in the way of surveying, measurement, establishing the corners, lines, 
etc., I directed an order to be drawn on the fund appropriated for the 
purchase of such site for the sum of five hundred dollars, which was 
accordingly done, and such amount placed to the credit of the Orphans' 
Home to be so used. I am very sure that this lodge and this great fra- 
ternity are to be congratulated that a site so beautiful, and convenient, 
has been purchased at a price so moderate. 

Deficit in Appropriations for the Illinois Masonic Home at Sullivan. 

On July 22, Bros. Owen Scott, Henry W. Berks, and James A. 
Steele, who constitute the Executive Committee of the Board of Trus- 
tees in immediate charge of the Home at Sullivan, represented to me in 
writing that the appropriation made by the last Grand Lodge for the 
support and maintenance of the Sullivan Home for the current year, 
had been exhausted ; that they would unavoidably be compelled to go 
into debt for the maintenance of the Home or must look to me for 
relief. It was represented to me that on account of the increased cost 
of provisions and material of every character, the added expense of 
maintaining a hospital, the accession to the number of the members of 
the Home, and particularly to the expenses incident to receiving and car- 
ing for those who were wholly helpless, it was necessary that an addi- 



1909- ) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 31 

tional sum of five thousand dollars be placed to the credit of that in- 
stitution. 

While, of course, the members of the Board of Trustees and of this 
Executive Committee, as well as myself, very much regretted that such 
a deficit should have arisen, I felt that the institution was ours and that 
we were obliged to maintain it. I thought that there was no good reason 
why those in immediate charge of the institution should be embarrassed 
by being asked to contract indebtedness, because after all, the indebted- 
ness would be ours, which ultimately we would pay. 

I therefore submitted the communication of the Executive Commit- 
tee to the Finance Committee of this Grand Lodge and on August 1 last, 
the Finance Committee addressed its communication to me advising that 
a warrant for five thousand dollars be drawn on the Grand Lodge treas- 
ury in favor of the Sullivan Home. Accordingly, on August 3, I di- 
rected the Grand Secretary to draw an order for five thousand dollars 
payable to the Trustees of our Homes for the use of the Sullivan Home, 
which was done. I respectfully report this action to this Grand Lodge 
and request that my action be approved or that such action be taken with 
reference thereto as in your wisdom may seem proper. 

Discovery and Sale of Real Estate at Butler, Illinois. 

At some time early last spring a gentleman whose name I have for- 
gotten called upon me and said that his father who had been a member 
of a lodge at Butler, Illinois, had been for a number of years looking 
after a few odds and ends which had belonged to that lodge and I un- 
derstood the statement to be in substance that all of the property there 
consisted of an old desk, table, chair or two and a few trifling articles 
of personal property. He left some papers with me which I examined 
and by correspondence and inquiry conducted largely through Bro. D. W. 
Starr, District Deputy for the 36th Masonic District, I learned that there 
had once been a lodge of Masons at Butler, in Montgomery county, 
known as Butler Lodge No. 459, and that it surrendered its charter on 
May 18, 1887. I learned that that lodge and the lodge of I.O.O.F. of the 
same place jointly owned a lot and building thereon; and that the lodge 
of Odd Fellows had long ago surrendered is charter ; that the property 
had been lying practically useless and abandoned for many years, but 
that the legal title was in this Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge I.O.O.F. 
as tenants in common. This parcel of real estate was represented to me 
as being of trifling value but through the diligent and intelligent exer- 
tions of Brother Starr a purchaser was found for the same at the price 
of five hundred dollars. I knew that technically I had no power to eon 
vey real estate belonging to this Grand Lodge unless expressly author- 
ized to <lo so, but because of the small value of this parcel of ground 



32 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

and because it was in the nature of a "find," I communicated with the 
Grand Master I.O.O.F. and agreed with him that we would convey the 
property and ask our respective Grand Lodges to ratify our actions. Ac- 
cordingly the Grand Master I.O.O.F. and I, as the Grand Master of this 
Grand Lodge, executed a quit-claim deed and conveyed that parcel of 
property for the price of five hundred dollars which was paid to me in 
cash. Out of the amount so collected, I paid to Brother Starr to cover 
his expenses connected with the work of procuring a purchaser and ef- 
fectuating the sale, seven dollars and two cents, and I paid him for his 
valuable services which in this case were indispensable, the sum of 
twenty-five dollars, making a total expenditure of thirty-two dollars and 
two cents, leaving a net amount of cash to be divided between this 
Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge I.O.O.F. of four hundred and sixty- 
seven dollars and ninety-eight cents. I paid to the Grand Master, I.O.O.F., 
one-half of that amount, namely, two hundred and thirty-three dollars 
and ninety-nine cents and I paid to our Grand Secretary, Bro. Isaac 
Cutter, a like amount of two hundred and thirty-three dollars and ninety- 
nine cents, and took his receipt therefor. This comes to us purely as a 
"find," but inasmuch as my act in conveying the title of this Grand Lodge 
to that property was without express authority, I respectfully request 
that my action in executing such conveyance be approved by this Grand 
Lodge, or that such action may be taken with reference thereto as in 
your wisdom shall seem best. 

The Philadelphia Conference. 

On the initiative of George B. Orlady, R.W. Grand Master, F. and 
A.M., of the State of Pennsylvania, a conference was held in the city 
of Philadelphia on the first, second and third days of June last, by the 
Grand Masters of Masons of the several Grand Jurisdictions of the 
United States east of the Mississippi River. 

Invitation had been extended to the Grand Master of each of the 
states east of the Mississippi River. All, however, were not able to at- 
tend. The conference was attended by the Grand Masters of the fol- 
lowing states, or by their official representatives : Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode 
Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsyl- 
vania. 

This conference was called in the hope of eliminating those differ- 
ences in the laws of the several Grand Jurisdictions which are the most 
frequent cause of irritation and misunderstanding. There has been some 
little suspicion that the purpose of such conference either avowed or 



1909- ) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 33 

covert, was to pave the way for the formation of a National Grand 
Lodge. No such purpose, however, was suggested by the Grand Master 
of Pennsylvania, who acted as the presiding officer at such conference, 
and I am sure that no such purpose received serious consideration from 
any considerable number of those participating in the conference, and 
no one proposed it. It is true that our distinguished brother, Charles N. 
Mikels, Past Grand Master of Masons of Indiana, who at such confer- 
ence represented the present Grand Master, seemed to be in fav6r of a 
National Grand Lodge, and since such conference Brother Mikels has 
sent to Grand Masters and to many other Masons an interesting contri- 
bution of his own favoring this idea. I am sure that I can say that there 
is no likelihood of there being even a serious proposition to form a 
National Grand Lodge as a result of this conference, or of any similar 
conference which may be hereafter held. So far as I am personally 
concerned, I know of no desirable purpose which could be served by the 
formation of a National Grand Lodge. Occasionally some enthusiastic 
brother whose enthusiasm lifts his feet off the ground, shouts vocifer- 
ously for a National Grand Lodge, but I don't know of any desirable 
function which such an organization could accomplish. It would be a 
novelty, if not a monstrosity in the world. There is no National Grand 
Lodge of the British Empire. England has her Grand Lodge, Scotland 
and Ireland have their Grand Lodges. The several autonomous districts 
of Canada have respectively their Grand Lodge and so it is as to all 
the various autonomous parts of the British Empire. There is not now 
in my opinion and never will be in this country, any such demand for a 
National Grand Lodge as can elevate the consideration of the question 
above the domain of pure empiricism. We have no more use for a 
National Grand Lodge than a duck has for an umbrella. 

The conference at Philadelphia was, as I have stated, for the pur- 
pose of suggesting to the several Grand Lodges of the United States, 
such modifications in their existing laws as would make our laws touch- 
ing questions of residence, jurisdiction of candidates, jurisdiction over 
rejected material, and of many other matters, more nearly harmonious, 
somewhat as it has been ofttimes proposed that the several states of the 
Union in the interest of good morals ought to make their laws on mar- 
riage and divorce more nearly uniform. 

The Grand Master of Pennsylvania at this conference, and the Right 
Worshipful Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania through its other officers and 
the Masons generally of Pennsylvania and of Philadelphia, extended to 
the visiting representatives at that conference, the most cordial recep- 
tion and entertainment. I am sure that that conference was fruitful of 
great good. The fact that I call attention to so few of the points cov- 
ered, is only because I am pleased to say that the laws of this Grand 



34 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Jurisdiction were such that but very slight modification in one or two 
particulars would bring them into conformity with what was there found 
to be the more general practice throughout the states. This conference 
was held with the full knowledge on the part of all who participated in 
it that it had no legislative power whatever. That it could do nothing 
but consider those matters wherein the laws of the several Grand Juris- 
dictions were markedly different and were of such nature as to cause 
friction and irritation in the correspondence among the several Grand 
Lodges. It was definitely understood and stated repeatedly that the con- 
ference could do no more than to recommend to the several Grand 
Lodges such changes as would be effective in the attainment of this pur- 
pose. It was agreed at the conference that only those things should be 
recommended which received the unanimous consent of all present. 

The several recommendations of the conference were as follows: 
First : "The name of the petitioner should be subscribed in full to 
the petition." 

This refers to a petition to be made a Mason or for membership, 
and is already the law in Illinois. 

Second: "The date and place of the birth of the petitioner should be 
given in the petition." 

This is not required by our law but is wholly unobjectionable and 
would ofttimes be very useful. 

Third : "The occupation of the petitioner should be designated in the 
petition, specifically and in detail, both with relation to himself and to 
his employer, if any." 

This is not required under the laws of Illinois, but the purpose and 
effect of such a law is more accurately to describe the petitioner and to 
put it in the power of the lodge or of its committee to learn all'needful 
things about the petitioner. 

Fourth: "Where the petitioner resides in a city having streets that 
are named and houses that are numbered, he should state in his peti- 
tion the name of his street and the number of his house." This is re- 
quired by our laws. 

The four points above mentioned, all relate to petitions to be made 
a Mason or for membership. The recommendations above quoted would 
be quite helpful in many instances and could possibly be harmful in 
none, and I therefore unhesitatingly recommend that such amendments 
to our by-laws be offered as would embody in the petition the require- 
ments of the second and third recommendations above quoted. I know 
that it sometimes happens that a petitioner will designate his occupation 
by some general term such as that he is a salesman or a manager, etc., 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 35 

and it can be seen at once that he might be a salesman in a very disrep- 
utable employment or he might be a manager of a wholly unlawful en- 
terprise. 

Fifth: "The members of the investigating committee where such a 
committee is appointed, should subscribe to a report in writing, when 
required, as to a thorough investigation of the character of the petitioner. 
This recommendation applying only to those jurisdictions where reports 
in writing are required." 

This fifth recommendation it will be seen, has no application to Illi- 
nois, as we do not require a written report from the committee. 

. Sixth : "A petition to be made a Mason should state that the peti- 
tioner has never before petitioned a lodge of Masons to be made a Ma- 
son or in cases where the petitioner has before petitioned to be made a 
Mason, he should state the name, number, location and jurisdiction of 
the lodge previously petitioned and the date as near as may be of such 
petition." 

This is already substantially the law of Illinois. 

Seventh: "A petitioner should have resided within the jurisdiction 
of the Grand Lodge for one year; that is, have had a legal residence 
there for one year." 

This is already the law of Illinois. 

Eighth : "When application is made by a petitioner whose legal resi- 
dence is in another jurisdiction which by its laws claims the petitioner 
as its material, a waiver of jurisdiction should be requested from the last 
named jurisdiction." 

This is the law of Illinois. 

Ninth: "The form of renunciation used in Pennsylvania, should be 
required from petitioners who have been identified with clandestine bod- 
ies." I took the position at that conference that a so-called clandestine 
lodge or bogus lodge is in fact no lodge and that there was no reason 
why we should require a renunciation of that which from our point of 
view has no existence, and my own personal opinion is that to require 
any form of renunciation under the circumstances, is only to dignify 
that which is really beneath our notice. But it appeared at this confer- 
ence that some of our sister jurisdictions have had wide experience in 
this matter and were quite solicitous that this recommendation be adopted. 
I did not, therefore, continue my opposition to its adoption as I could 
see that such a renunciation might be helpful in many instances and I do 
not know that it could be harmful in any. 

Tenth : "No petition to be made a Mason should be received from 
one previously rejected in another jurisdiction within five years after 



36 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

such rejection, until the rejecting lodge has by unanimous ballot waived' 
its claim of jurisdiction." This, as will be seen, involved the question 
of perpetual jurisdiction. I was somewhat surprised to find at this con- 
ference that our Illinois law whereby we claim perpetual jurisdiction 
over rejected material, is somewhat out of harmony with the prevailing 
laws of the several Grand Lodges of this country. Some of the Grand 
Lodges have a law similar to ours. Most of them, however, do not. 
Indeed, during my service as your Grand Master, I have had this ex- 
perience ; that a man rejected by a lodge in Illinois petitions a lodge in 
another state which does not recognize our perpetual jurisdiction and 
indeed some of the states do not recognize jurisdiction in another state 
over rejected material at all and I have seen parties rejected by Illinois 
lodges regularly made Masons in states where they do not give heed to 
our claim of perpetual jurisdiction. I had never given this subject much 
thought until I attended this conference. I am persuaded that it would 
be well to change our law to conform to the recommendation of the con- 
ference. This recommendation it will be seen proposes to recognize 
jurisdiction over rejected material for a term of five years and this 
would require a marked change in the laws of several states as some 
states only require that the petitioner shall have resided in the state the 
length of time required by their by-laws, and the fact that he was at an 
earlier date rejected by a lodge in another state is no objection whatever. 
All states in which the law is this way, will, of course, if they adopt this 
recommendation, be required to recognize the jurisdiction for a term of 
five years. I confess I see no good reason why jurisdiction over rejected 
material should be perpetual. If a party is rejected by my lodge having 
resided in the state a year and within the jurisdiction of my lodge for 
six months, he may very shortly after his rejection move into the juris- 
diction of another lodge in this state or in another state. He may live 
in the jurisdiction of that other lodge several years and be much better, 
known in that community and to the members of that lodge than he was 
in my lodge. To say in such a case that the members of my lodge are 
the only Masons who can judge as to whether such party may properly 
be made a Mason, is in my opinion, an assumption that is not sound. I 
believe that if this Grand Lodge will modify its existing law to conform 
to this recommendation, it will be helpful and if the other Grand Lodges 
of the country will do the same, it will tend very greatly to promote 
harmony in the interstate correspondence of the several Grand Masters. 
As among our own lodges we can still hold perpetual jurisdiction. 

Eleventh: "All intra jurisdictional communications should be sent 
through the offices of the Grand Masters." 

I think this provision is wise from my experience and recommend 
its adoption here. 






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36 Proceedings of the (October 12. 

such rejection, until the rejecting lodge has by unanimous ballot waived- 
its claim of jurisdiction." This, as will be seen, involved the question 
of perpetual jurisdiction. I was somewhat surprised to find at this con- 
ference that our Illinois law whereby we claim perpetual jurisdiction 
over rejected material, is somewhat out of harmony with the prevailing 
laws of the several Grand Lodges of this country. Some of the Grand 
Lodges have a law similar to ours. Most of them, however, do not. 
Indeed, during my service as your Grand Master, I have had this ex- 
perience; that a man rejected by a lodge in Illinois petitions a lodge in 
another state which does not recognize our perpetual jurisdiction and 
indeed some of the states do not recognize jurisdiction in another state 
over rejected material at all and I have seen parties rejected by Illinois 
lodges regularly made Masons in states where they do not give heed to 
our claim of perpetual jurisdiction. I had never given this subject much 
thought until I attended this conference. I am persuaded that it would 
be well to change our law to conform to the recommendation of the con- 
ference. This recommendation it will be seen proposes to recognize 
jurisdiction over rejected material for a term of five years and this 
would require a marked change in the laws of several states as some 
states only require that the petitioner shall have resided in the state the 
length of time required by their by-laws, and the fact that he was at an 
earlier date rejected by a lodge in another state is no objection whatever. 
All states in which the law is this way, will, of course, if they adopt this 
recommendation, be required to recognize the jurisdiction for a term of 
five years. I confess I see no good reason why jurisdiction over rejected 
material should be perpetual. If a party is rejected by my lodge having 
resided in the state a year and within the jurisdiction of my lodge for 
six months, he may very shortly after his rejection move into the juris- 
diction of another lodge in this state or in another state. He may live 
in the jurisdiction of that other lodge several years and be much better, 
known in that community and to the members of that lodge than he was 
in my lodge. To say in such a case that the members of my lodge are 
the only Masons who can judge as to whether such party may properly 
be made a Mason, is in my opinion, an assumption that is not sound. I 
believe that if this Grand Lodge will modify its existing law to conform 
to this recommendation, it will be helpful and if the other Grand Lodges 
of the country will do the same, it will tend very greatly to promote 
harmony in the interstate correspondence of the several Grand Masters. 
As among our own lodges we can still hold perpetual jurisdiction. 

Eleventh: "All intra jurisdictional communications should be sent 
through the offices of the Grand Masters." 

I think this provision is wise from my experience and recommend 
its adoption here. 






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1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 37 

Records of Western Star Lodge No. 107. 

I presume that most Masons in Illinois know the fact that the pres- 
ent Grand Lodge is not the first Grand Lodge of Masons which was es- 
tablished in this state. I do not now take the time to go into the history 
of the matter except to say that the first lodge „of Masons in Illinois was 
Western Star Lodge No. 107, at Kaskaskia, Illinois, which received its 
dispensation from the R.W. Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. 

While attending the Conference of Grand Masters at Philadelphia, 
I made some inquiry about any papers or records connected with this an- 
cient lodge and by the unexpected generosity of R.W. Grand Master 
George B. Orlady, of Pennsylvania, I was given the first returns made 
by Western Star Lodge No. 107, to the R.W. Grand Lodge of Pennsyl- 
vania in December, A.D. 1806. This is the only ancient Masonic docu- 
ment in the State of Illinois today, so far as I am advised. It is a most 
valuable find and I know will be of profound interest to every Mason in 
this state. I have therefore had the same duplicated in exact form and 
size as a part of this address, and thus it will be preserved in our Pro- 
ceedings, and the publisher of the Proceedings will no doubt print a 
large number of the sheets which will not be put into the Proceedings 
and any of the brethren who desire to get a copy will thus be able to 
procure it from the Pantagraph Printing & Stationery Company, of 
Bloomington, the publishers of these Proceedings. I will deposit with 
our Grand Secretary the document thus received. I do not know of 
anything in the history of Masonry in this state since the organization 
of the present Grand Lodge which is of more historical value than this. 

A Home for the Grand Lodge. 

The one thing about the conference of Grand Masters at Philadelphia 
which impressed me, I think, more profoundly than all other things, 
was the splendid Temple in Philadelphia owned by the Grand Lodge of 
Pennsylvania. It furnishes beautiful offices with every conceivable con- 
venience and equipment for the Grand Master, the Grand Treasurer and 
Grand Secretary. It had a large room for the meetings of the Grand 
Lodge, committee rooms, and beautiful rooms for the meetings of con- 
stituent lodges. It has a splendid library and museum and is a com- 
plete and elaborate home for Masonry in Pennsylvania. The Grand 
Lodge of Illinois is in point of numbers, at least the greatest on this 
continent excepting only that of New York. I am thoroughly convinced 
that this Grand Lodge ought seriously to consider the establishing in this 
state of a home for itself. We could acquire sufficient real estate in 
Chicago, outside the business district, but in a part of the city where 
good hotels are conveniently located, and erect a building which would be 



38 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

creditable to us and of which we would all be proud. As it is now, our 
Grand Lodge has no abiding place and our Grand Officers have no home. 
The records and papers in the Grand Secretary's office are shipped from 
point to point as one Grand Secretary is succeeded by another. The 
Grand Treasurer keeps his books in his place of business and the Grand 
Master keeps his records and papers wherever he happens to be or to 
live. Our Grand Lodge has no museum. It has no library worthy of 
the name, and it has no permanent place of meeting. Since I have been 
attending this Grand Lodge, we have met in theaters and music halls, 
and have drifted about from place to place. I know that it will cost 
money to acquire a site and erect the building, but so do all other good 
things in this world cost money, and I for one am in favor of doing it 
anyhow. I fully understand . that we are now erecting buildings and 
contracting large liabilities, but we are a large and powerful organiza- 
tion. To wait until we can, by the practice of economy in expenditures, 
save a sum sufficient to erect such a temple as I have in mind, would be 
to postpone to the indefinite future that which we might as well have 
now. We have a total membership in this state of nearly one hundred 
thousand. We could raise the Grand Lodge dues by specifically provid- 
ing that the amount of the increase should be a special fund to be known 
as the Masonic Temple Fund and to be used for the purpose here re- 
ferred to. Even if it should cost several hundred thousand dollars to 
accomplish the purpose which I indicate, a tax of fifty cents a year or 
one dollar a year would accomplish it in so short a time that we would 
very speedily acquire the amount desired. It might be considered 
whether this Grand Lodge with its abundant means of revenue might 
not issue bonds to a reasonable amount for the purpose intended. If we 
could build such a temple either here in Chicago or at some other point 
in the state, if thought best, we would do more to put Masonry on a 
real permanent footing than any other thing that we could do, and I 
regard it as a matter of supreme importance that our Grand Lodge build 
up a real Masonic Library and museum of interest historically and Ma- 
sonically, that there shall be a place with ample room where all the records, 
files and correspondence of our Grand Officers, their books of account 
and all things appertaining to this Grand Lodge, may be assembled and 
safely kept, and where our Grand Lodge will have a regular and perma- 
nent place of meeting. 

It will perhaps be suggested that the provision in Section 5 of our 
charter which provides that this Grand Lodge shall have authority "to 
borrow money not exceeding one thousand dollars at any one time," is 
such a limitation as would prevent the Grand Lodge from effectuating 
the scheme here suggested by contracting indebtedness therefor. If 
it should be thought that such is the effect of this charter provision, 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 39 

and I admit that I am myself of that opinion, we can nevertheless 
accomplish the purpose otherwise. A company or association could 
be formed which could acquire the real estate and make improve- 
ments, issuing bonds therefor, and this Grand Lodge in considera- 
tion that the Company would convey the property to it when the 
bonds were paid might guarantee the payment of the bonds. There 
is no limitation in the charter against the incurring of liabilities. With- 
out now taking pains to elaborate the details of the method whereby the 
purpose in view could be accomplished, I feel quite sure that there are 
heads in this Grand Lodge which can give form and effect to the project 
and carry it to a triumphant conclusion. I am sure that there are a 
great many Masons in Illinois who would very willingly take a bond of 
a thousand dollars guaranteed by this Grand Lodge. I will venture to 
state that I can raise half a million dollars right now before this Grand 
Lodge adjourns from the Masons who are here in Chicago upon a guar- 
antee for the re-payment of the same by this Grand Lodge. I most 
earnestly recommend that this subject be referred to a special commit- 
tee with directions to report in full at the next session of the Grand 
Lodge. 

Conclusion. 

Now that my year's work is nearly completed and my service as your 
Grand Master is rapidly drawing to a close, I have nothing but sincere 
gratitude in my heart to all the brethren of this Grand Lodge and to 
the fraternity generally throughout the state. Now that it is all over, I 
will admit that when I was elected Junior Grand Warden, I was im- 
mensely gratified, but being thus placed in line and feeling reasonable as- 
surance that I would probably be regularly advanced until I became 
Grand Master, I was never in the least impatient at the delay in ad- 
vancement. Indeed I knew that while I was in line and being regularly 
promoted, I was something of a notable in the Grand Lodge, and now 
I know that when I step back and take my place among the Past Grand 
Masters of this Grand Lodge, I will not be by any means of such im- 
portance as before. I am profoundly grateful to my brethren for the 
repeated honors which have been conferred upon me. I have done my 
best at all times to deserve your confidence. I have served you in this 
capacity two years; indeed I enjoy the unique distinction of having served 
as Grand Master one week longer than any of my predecessors, so that 
I will have this to distinguish my administration if nothing else shall 
serve that purpose. My experience as Grand Master, whether of benefit 
to the craft or not, has been immensely improving to me. I have worked 
hard. I have never neglected anything that I knew should be done. I 
have given every question that came before me my best consideration, and 
have in hundreds of instances by the exercise of patience and good n;i- 



40 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

tvtre, avoided friction and allayed irritation and reinstated an era of good 
feeling among brethren who before then had become estranged. 

I would not take anything for the proud distinction of having been 
Grand Master of Masons of this state. But I am like the newly mar- 
ried man that I heard of who was telling about the baby that had come 
to his home. He said he loved it immensely and would not take a mil- 
lion dollars for it, but he would not have another in the house for two 
millions. So while I am proud beyond measure at the distinction of hav- 
ing been Grand Master, and would not take a million dollars for the 
experience, and the honor thus conferred upon me, I would not under- 
take the job again. 

In everything that I have done I have had the cordial co-operation 
and support of my brethren. The brightest and dearest thing in the office 
of Grand Master is the cordiality with which the craft throughout the 
state seconds the efforts of the Grand Master in all that he may do for 
our interest. I now thank all of my associate officers of this Grand 
Lodge, all of my District Deputies, and members of Committees, the 
Masters and officers of constituent lodges and my brethren generally 
throughout the state for the kind forbearance with which Uhey have 
treated me and the generous assistance which they have ungrudgingly 
accorded me on all occasions. 

When I retire from this position, I shall feel that I do so with the 
cordial good will of all my brethren. I shall take my place among the 
Past Grand Masters of Illinois with a feeling of profound gratitude to 
all the brethren. I have now in this Grand Lodge no ambition except 
to be useful to Masonry. I shall surrender to my successor in office 
this gavel of authority without one lingering regret. First, because I 
shall be glad to be relieved of the responsibility, and next, because I 
know that it will pass into worthy and able hands. I hope to attend 
this Grand Lodge each year as long as I live. The friendships formed 
here have been the brightest and dearest in life, and it shall be my 
constant effort to keep them undimmed while we journey together on 
life's pathway. 

Alexander H. Bele, 

Grand Master. 

The address of the M.W. Grand Master was, on motion, 
referred to the Committee on Grand Master's address. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 41 

EEPOET-Of the Grand Treasurer. 

The R.W. Grand Treasurer, Leroy A. Goddard, presented 
his report. 

Chicago, October 8, 1909. 
Leroy A. Goddard., Grand Treasurer, 

In Account with M.W. Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., of Illinois. 

General Fund. 
1908. debit. 

Oct. 5. Balance on hand, as per last report $43,779 30 

Nov. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary $ 143 10 

Dec. 1. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 107 50 

1909. 
Jan. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 31 00 

Feb. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 230 00 

Feb. 18. Transferred from I.M.O.H. Fund, 

Voucher No. 82 776 28 

Mar. 8. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 1,173 50 

Apr. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 424 02 

May 10. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 118 00 

June 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 27 75 

July 6. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 23G 00 

Aug. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 32,821 35 

Sept. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 19,056 34 

Sept. 27. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 700 56 

56,445 40 



Total $100,224 70 



42 Proceedings of the (October 12, 



1909. CREDIT. 

Oct. 8. By mileage and per diem paid officers 
and committees since last report, as per 
vouchers returned herewith $ 3,378 00 

Oct. 8. By mileage and per diem paid repre- 
sentatives since last report, as per 
vouchers returned herewith 16,326 10 

Oct. 8. By miscellaneous orders paid since last 
report, as per vouchers returned here- 
with, numbered 24 to 36 both inclusive ; 
39, 40; 42, 43; 46 to 54 both inclusive; 
5S to 78 both inclusive; 81; 83 to 93 
both inclusive; 97 to 104 both inclu- 
sive; 106; 110 to 112; both inclusive; 
114; 116 to 118 both inclusive; 121 to 
125 both inclusive; 128 to 131 both in- 
clusive ; 135 to 138 botjh inclusive ; 
141 to 143 both inclusive; 146 to 153 
both inclusive 22,023 16 

Oct. 8. By vouchers herewith, paid salaries 
Grand Officers, Nos. 57, 38, 44, 45, 55, . 
56, 57, 79, 80, 94, 95, 107, 108, 109, 
119, 120, 126, 127, 133, 134, 139, 140, 

144, 145, 154, 155, and 156 4,900 00 

46,627 26 

Balance on hand 53,597 44 



Total $100,224 70 

Charity Fund. 

1908. DEBIT. 

Oct. 5. Balance on hand, as per last report $31,396 72 

Nov. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary $ 87 50 

Dec. 1. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary . 3,909 94 

1909. 
Feb. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 148 00 f 

Mar. 8. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 22 75 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 43 

Apr. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 81 25 

June 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 8 00 

Aug. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 21,016 45 

Sept. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 12,302 55 

Sept. 27. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 460 20 

38,036 64 



Total $69,433 36 



1909. 



Oct. 8. By vouchers herewith paid since last 

report, Nos. 15 to 50, both inclusive. .$37,924 59 

Balance on hand 31,508 77 

Total 69,433 36 

Orphans' Home Fund. 
1908. DEBIT. 

Oct. 5. Balance on hand, as per last report $ 10,504 77 

Nov. 1. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary $ 250 00 

Dec. 1. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 510 00 

1909. 
Jan. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 450 00 

Feb. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 414 50 

Mar. 8. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 10 00 

Apr. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 240 00 

May 10. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 5,333 33 

June 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 5,9 16 67 

July 6. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 200 00 



417 50 




10 00 




246 00 






14,028 00 





44 Proceedings of the (October 12, 



Aug. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 
Secretary 

Sept. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 
Secretary 

Sept. 27. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 
Secretary 



Total $24,532 77 

1909. CREDIT. 

Oct. 8. By vouchers herewith paid since last 

report, Nos. 82, 96, 105, 113, and 132. $ 2,224 54 

Balance on hand 22,308 23 

Total $24,532 77 

Home for Aged Fund. 

1908. DEBIT. 

Oct. 5. Balance on hand, as per last report $2,773 44 

Dec. 1. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary $ ' 20 00 

1909. 
Feb. 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 

Apr. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 

June 2. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 

Aug. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 

Sept. 27. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 

Total $3,193 44 

1909. CREDIT. 

Oct. 8. By voucher herewith paid since last 

report, No. 41 $ 2,04182 

Balance on hand 1,151 62 

Total $3,193 44 



150 00 




40 00 




20 00 




150 00 




40 00 






420 00 





1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 45 

Masonic Home Fund. 

190S. DEBIT. 

Oct. 5. Balance on hand, as per last report , . $204 55 

Dec. 1. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary $55 65 

1909. 
Aug. 3. Received from Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand 

Secretary 5 00 

■ 60 65 

Total $265 20 

1909. CREDIT. 

Oct. 8. No vouchers paid during the past year. 

Balance on hand $265 20 

In addition to the cash balances reported above, the M.W. Grand 
Lodge owns the following securities, all of which are now in my pos- 
session as Grand Treasurer, and deposited in safety vault specifically 
designated as the property of the M.W. Grand Lodge : 

Charity Fund. 

Seven City of Chicago 4 per cent bonds, due 1915, $1,000 
each, numbered 1004, 1065, 1066, 1067, 1068, 1069 and 3S8 ; 
coupons January and July $ 7,000 00 

Four Cook County bonds, due 1919, $1,000 each, numbered 

3261, 3262, 3263, 3264; coupons March and September... 4,000 00 

Eight shares stock Masonic Fraternity Temple Association... S00 00 



$11,800 00 
Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home Fund. 

Fifteen Registered Illinois Central R. R. Co. 4 per cent gold 
bonds, due 1953, $1,000 each, numbered 7133, 7134. 7135. 
7136, 7137, 7138, 7139, 7140, 7141, 7142, 7143, 7144, 13060,' 
13086, 13089 ; interest due May and November $15,000 00 

Ten Sanitary District of Chicago 4 per cent bonds, due 1919. 
$1,000 each, numbered 21856, 21857, 21858, 21859, 21860, 
21861, 21862, 21863, 21864, 21865; coupons June and De- 
cember 1 0.OOd 00 

Five Sanitary District of Chicago 4 per cent bonds. (\\\c 1919. 
$1,000 each, numbered 18341, 18342, 18343. 18344, L8345; 
coupons, April and October ^a ] ^ 90 



46 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Five Sanitary District of Chicago 4 per cent bonds, due 
1920, $1,000 each, numbered 18568, 18569, 18570, 18571, 
18572; coupons, April and October 5,000 00 

Ten City of Chicago 4 per cent bonds due 1910, $1,000 each, 
numbered 939, 940, 966, 967, 968, 969, 970, 971, 972, 973; 
coupons January and July 10,000 00 

Five City of Chicago 4 per cent bonds, due 1912, $1,000 each, 

numbered 66, 67, 68, 69 and 70 ; coupons January and July 5,000 00 

Ten Cook County 4 per cent bonds, due 1917, $1,000 each, 
numbered 2863, 2864, 2865, 2866, 2867, 2868, 2869, 2870, 
2871, and 2872 ; coupons March and September 10,000 00 

One Cook County 4 per cent bond, due 1919, No. 3265 ; cou- 
pons March and September 1,000 00 

Ten Lincoln Park, Chicago, 4 per cent bonds, due 1924, $1,000 
each, numbered 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409 
and 410 ; coupons May and November 10,000 00 

Eight Mattoon Township 4 per cent bonds due 1920, $1,000 
each; numbered 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37; coupons, 
May 1, annually 8,000 00 

Five Illinois Central R. R. Co. 4 per cent bonds, due 1952, 
$500 each, numbered 14218, 14219, 14220, 15418, 15592; 
coupons April and October 2,500 00 

One U. S. Government 4 per cent bond, No. 19451, due 1925; 

coupons quarterly 1,000 00 

Total $82,500 00 

Home for Aged Fund. 

Seven City of Chicago 4 per cent Bonds, due 1918, $1,000 each, 
numbered 1062, 1063, 1076, 1077, 1078, 1079 and 1080, 
coupons January and July $7,000 00 

One City of Chicago 4 per cent Bond, due 1921, No. 4186, 

coupons January and July 500 00 

One Illinois Central R. R. Co. 4 per cent bond, due 1953, 

No. 4583 ; interest May and November 1,000 00 

One Cook County 4 per cent Bond, due 1917, No. 2874, in- 
terest March and September 1,000 00 

One Wabash R. R. Co. 4 per cent bond, due 1941, No. 1722; 

interest March and September 1,000 00 

$10,500 00 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 47 

Illinois Masonic Home Fund. 
One Cook County 4 per cent Bond, due 1917, Xo. 2S73, cou- 
pons March and September $1,000 00 

Summary. 

Bonds and securities on hand, all funds $105,800 00 

Cash on hand, all funds 10S,S31 26 



Total Assets in Treasury $214,631 26 

Fraternally submitted, 

Leroy A. Goddard, 

Grand Treasurer. 

This certifies that at the close of business, October 8, 1909, the fol- 
lowing credit balances appeared on the books of the State Bank of 
Chicago to the accounts as listed below : 

Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M. — 

General Fund $53,597 44 

Charity Fund 31,50S 77 

Orphans' Home Fund 22,308 22 

Home for Aged Fund 1,15162 

Masonic Home Fund 265 20 

Hexry S. Hexschex, Cashier. 

The R.W. Grand Treasurer asked that the report be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Finance. It \vas so ordered. 



48 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

KEPORT-Of Grand Secretary. 
The R.W. Grand Secretary, Isaac Cutter, presented his 
report. 

Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

In accordance with the by-laws of the Grand Lodge, I herewith 
submit my annual report : 

Orders Drawn. 
Orders have been drawn on the Grand Treasurer at and since the 
last Annual Communication for the following amounts : 

To Mileage and per diem of Officers and Committees $3,378 00 

Mileage and per diem of Representatives 16,326 10 

Dr. Robbins, Committee on Correspondence 500 00 

C. S. Gurney, Grand Tyler 100 00 

C. S. Gurney, expense of Grand Lodge 73 76 

C. Rohrbough, error in mileage 4 30 

Masonic Temple Ass'n, rent 300 00 

Z. T. Griffin, stenographer 50 00 

G. A. Stadler, Deputy Grand Secretary 25 00 

W. B. Grimes, mileage and per diem ." 50 00 

Masonic Relief Association 427 90 

Printing 2,500 Blue Books 809 00 

H. P. Behrensmeyer, engrossing, etc 101 00 

C. S. Gurney, washing aprons 22 50 

Pantagraph Ptg. & Sta. Co., proceedings and advance copies 4,089 07 

Expense Grand Secretary's office, postage 415 10 

Expense Grand Secretary's office, miscellaneous 247 85 

Expense Grand Master's office 636 60 

Premium on bonds of Grand Treasurer and Grand Sec... 152 88 

Miscellaneous printing 441 36 

W. J. Hempstreet & Co., insurance 10 99 

H. M. Dietrich, fees 550 00 

A. H. Bell, purchase lots for I.M.O.H ..10,372 03 

W. C. Hippard, Appellate Court costs 270 65 

D. D. Darrah, suit case for Grand Examiners 15 00 

E. E. B. Sawyer, insurance 50 80 

Repairs on Illinois Masonic Home. 28 15 

Owen Scott, settlement Miller Bros 753 31 

McMein Printing Co., printing 5 50 

A. H. Bell, registration fees 4 25 

Expenses Board of Grand Examiners, School at Olney 218 80 

Expenses Board of Grand Examiners, School at Granite City 215 60 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 49 

Expenses Board of Grand Examiners, School at Danville. . 200 30 

Expenses Board of Grand Examiners, School at Aurora... 211 50 

Expenses Board of Grand Examiners, School at Rock Island 238 00 

Expenses Committee Valle de Mexico, Quincy 136 90 

James A. Steele, taxes on Home farm 82 71 

Owen Scott, Decatur to Quincy and return 28 10 

Geo. W. Cyrus, printing 134 25 

F. W. Burton, attorney fees 50 00 

A. H. Bell, salary ' 1,500 00 

L. A. Goddard, salary ■ 400 00 

Isaac Cutter, salary 3,000 00 

$46,627 26 

Charity Fund. 

To C. S. Gurney, maintenance Illinois Masonic Home $25,000 00 

C. S. Gurney, maintenance Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home 10,000 00 

Zentner Bros., rent 1,800 00 

Order Grand Lodge 80 00 

C. S. Gurney, deficit Illinois Masonic Home 218 09 

L. A. Goddard for Miriam Allen 200 00 

Orangeville Lodge for Mrs. J. C. Barnds 100 00 

H. W. Berks for J. Crabtree 100 00 

L. H. Bailey for H. M. Tinkler 100 00 

C. H. Catlin, nurse for Dr. Robbins 176 50 

Hiram Ingersoll for J. H. Van Blair 100 00 

A. M. Sharp for W. M. Walker 50 00 

$37,924 59 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' .Home Fund. 

To L. A. Goddard, for General Fund $ 776 28 

A. H. Bell, balance on Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home... S02 95 

H. W. Dietrich & Co., fees 29 50 

Owen Scott, taxes 115 81 

J. A. Steele, Building Fund 500 00 

$2,224 ."<! 

Home for Aged Fund. 

L. A. Goddard, investment $2,04 1 B2 



50 



Proceedings of the 



I herewith submit an itemized account of all moneys received by 
as Grand Secretary during the past year : 



LODGES. 


NO. 


DUES. 


LODGES. 


NO. 


DUE 


Bodley 


1 

2 
3 
4 

7 
8 
9 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
19 
20 
23 
24 
25 
27 
29 
31 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
55 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
69 
71 
72 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 


$ 230 40 

32 40 
187 20 
195 30 
193 50 
522 90 

85 50 
113 40 

54 00 
492 30 

72 00 
166 50 
157 50 
132 30 
129 60 
131 40 

81 90 
150 30 
101 70 
122 40 
452 70 
104 40 
160 20 

47 70 
156 60 
379 80 

101 70 
195 30 
345 60 
269 10 
100 80 

68 40 
762 30 
45 90 

80 10 
76 50 

125 10 
91 80 

54 00 
117 00 

55 80 
213 10 
104 40 

81 00 
250 20 

57 60 

102 60 
97 20 
95 40 

56 70 
135 90 

44 10 
198 90 
55 80 
65 70 
54 90 

103 rO 
262 80 
311 40 

42 30 


Whitehall 


80 

81 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

122 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

144 

145 

146 


$ 68 


Equality 


Vitruvius 


56 


DeWitt 


160 




Mitchell 


84 


Friendship 


Kaskaskia 


26 


Mt. Pulaski , 


67 




Havana 


90 




Fellowship 


104 




Jerusalem Temple 


232 




Metropolis 


96 


Temperance 


Stewart 

Toulon 


125 

67 




Perry 


57 




Samuel H. Davis 


49 






315 


St. Clair 


Taylor 


b2 


Franklin 

Piasa 


Edwardsville 

Astoria 


114 

71 


Pekin 


Rockf ord 


333 




63 






82 


Barry 




55 




99 


Kavanaugh 


Versailles 


53 


Monmouth 


Trenton 


41 




43 


Herman 

Occidental 


Jonesboro 

Bureau 

Robert Burns 

Marcelline 


54 
53 


Mt. Joliet 


63 


Bloomington 

Hardin 


51 


Rising Sun 

Vermont 


83 


Griggsville 


45 


Temple 


Elgin 


276 


Caledonia 


Waverly 


82 


Unity 




68 


Cambridge 




132 


Carrollton 

Mt. Moriah 


Oquawka 

Cedar 


53 
142 


Benevolent 




44 


Jackson 


Empire 


95 


Washington 


63 


Trio 


Raleigh 


44 


Fraternal 


64 


New Boston 

Belvidere 


Marion 

Golconda 


115 
54 


Lacon 




45 


St. Marks 


Marshall 

Sycamore 


90 


Benton 


161 


Euclid 


41 


Pacific 


Hutsonville 

Polk 


25 


Acacia 


84 


Eureka 


Marengo 

Geneva 

Olney 


72 


Central 

Chester 


71 
88 


Rockton 


Garden City 


1187 


Roscoe 


57 


Mt. Nebo 




60 


Prairie 


DeKalb 


160 


Waukegan 




60 


Scott 


Lee Center 


48 



.909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



51 



LODGE dues FOR the year 1909.— Continued. 



Clayton 

31oomfield 

Effingham 

Vienna 

3unker Hill 

fidelity 

}lay 

Russell 

Upha 

Delavan 

Jrbana 

tfcHenry 

fewanee 

Waubansia 

/"irden 

lope 

Mward Dobbins. 

Atlanta — 

>tar in the East . 

Gilford 

^unda 

evergreen 

rirard 

-Vayne 

Cherry Valley — 

jena 

tlatteson 

vlendota 

Staunton 

Uinois Central.. 

Wabash 

/loweaqua 

Jermania .. 

Meridian 

Abingdon 

rlysticTie 

"yrus 

n ulton City 

)undee 

I'armington 

lerrick 

freedom 

ja Harpe 

jouisville 

£ing Solomon's.. 

lomer 

>heba 

"entralia 

^avely 

i"lora 

Corinthian 

''airfield 

i'amaroa 

Wilmington 

Vm. B. Warren.. 

jogan 

Cleveland .. .. 

ihipman 

pava 

iillespie 

fewton 

dason 

'few Salem 

)akland 

vfahomet 



147 

148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
164 
165 
166 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
182 
183 
185 
187 
188 
189 
190 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
199 
200 
201 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 



213 
214 
216 
217 

218 
219 

220 



55 80 
117 00 
64 bO 
72 90 

71 10 
44 10 
79 20 
81 90 

155 70 

81 90 
288 90 

68 40 
169 20 
271 80 

98 10 

72 00 
71 10 
71 10 

366 30 

70 20 

63 00 
157 50 

84 60 
42 30 
53 10 

64 80 
326 70 

94 50 
114 30 
101 70 

36 90 

62 10 
282 60 

44 10 

82 80 

71 10 
79 20 
64 80 

131 40 
108 90 
27 90 

45 00 
114 30 

63 00 
49 50 
88 20 
36 90 

188 10 
63 00 
74 70 

58 50 
122 40 

45 90 
81 90 
433 80 
164 70 
532 80 
38 70 

72 90 

59 40 
81 90 
42 30 
:«3 30 

103 50 
38 70 



Leroy 

Geo. Washington. 

Pana 

Columbus 

Lovington 

Manchester 

New Haven 

Wyanet 

Farmers 

Blandinsville 

DuQuoin 

Dallas City 

Charter Oak 

Cairo 

Black Hawk 

Mt. Carmel 

Western Star 

Shekinah 

Galva 

Horicon 

Greenville 

El Paso 

Rob Morris 

Golden Gate 

Hibbard 

Robinson 

Hey worth 

Aledo 

Avon Harmony... 

Aurora 

Donnelson 

Warsaw 

Mattoon 

Amon 

Channahon 

Illinois 

Franklin G rove . . . 

Vermilion 

Kingston 

La Prairie 

Paris 

Wheaton 

Levi Lusk 

Blaney 

Carmi 

Miners 

Byron 

Milton 

Elizabeth 

Accordia 

Jo Daviess 

Neoga 

Kansas 

Brooklyn 

Meteor 

Catlin 

Plymouth 

De Soto 

Genoa 

Wataga 

Chenoa 

Prophetstown 

Pontiac 

Dills 

Quincy 



221 
222 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
257 
260 
261 
262 
263 
2fi4 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
880 
282 
283 
286 
286 



288 
291 
292 
293 
29 i 
296 
290 



64 80 
101 70 

188 10 
23 40 
93 60 
35 10 
67 50 
42 30 
69 30 

90 00 
92 70 
69 30 
92 70 

177 30 

54 90 
135 00 
278 10 
137 70 
124 20 
101 TO 

87 30 

88 20 
50 40 

59 40 
42 30 

lol 70 
83 70 

127 80 

39 60 
255 60 

35 10 

55 80 
227 70 

36 00 

52 20 
344 70 

29 70 
45 90 

40 50 
44 10 

178 20 
98 10 
27 90 

189 90 
79 20 

135 00 
57 60 

53 10 
26 10 

146 rU 
126 90 
v; 80 
53 in 
fS8 50 
87 SU 

91 so 

60 30 
108 00 

B0 00 
8R id 
:<\ 50 
;.; so 

128 70 

39 00 

184 60 



52 



Proceedings of the 



lodge DUES FOR THE year 1909.— Continued. 




Benjamin 

Wauconda 

Hinckley 

Durand 

Raven 

Onarga 

W. C. Hobbs 

T. J. Pickett 

Ashlar 

Harvard 

Dearborn 

Kilwinning 

Ionic 

York 

Palatine 

Abraham Jonas. 
J. L Anderson. . 

Doric 

Creston 

Dunlap 

Windsor 

Orient 

Harrisburg 

Industry 

Altona 

Mt. Erie 

Tuscola 

Tyrian 

Sumner 

Schiller 

New Columbia. . 

Oneida 

Saline 

Kedron 

Full Moon 

Sumnerfield 

Wenona 

Milledgeville 

N. D. Morse 

Sidney 

Russellville 

Sublette 

Fairview 

Tarbolton 

Groveland 

Kinderhook — 
Ark and Anchor 

Marine 

Hermitage 

Orion 

Blackberry 

Princeville 

Douglas 

Noble 

Horeb 

Tonica 

Bement 

Areola 

Oxford 

Jefferson 

Newman 

Livingston 

Chambersburg. . 

Shabonna ... 

Aroma 



301 
302 
303 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
316 
318 
319 
3*0 
321 
322 
323 
325 
327 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
339 
340 
341 
342 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 



361 

362 



365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
371 

374 



DUBS. 


% 93 60 


45 00 


72 9J 


60 30 


37 80 


60 30 


72 00 


90 (>0 


552 fiO 


127 80 


633 60 


577 80 


396 00 


74 70 


75 60 


27 bO 


84 60 


235 80 


40 50 


90 00 


67 50 


32 40 


129 60 


49 50 


45 90 


27 00 


104 40 


204 30 


9."> 40 


120 60 


58 50 


61 20 


39 60 


48 60 


60 30 


20 70 


46 8<» 


72 00 


27 00 


43 20 


31 50 


23 40 


45 90 


117 00 


34 20 


30 60 


72 00 


41 40 


64 80 


36 90 


81 90 


72 00 


36 90 


44 10 


72 00 


54 90 


77 40 


100 80 


48 60 


23 40 


78 30 


81 90 


16 20 


48 60 


34 20 



Payson 

Liberty 

Gill 

LaMoille 

Waltham 

Mississippi 

Bridgeport 

ElDara 

Kankakee 

Ashmore 

Tolono 

Oconee 

Blair 

Jersey ville 

Muddy Point. .. 

Shiloh 

Kinmundy 

Buda 

Odell 

Kishwaukee . . . 

Mason City 

Batavia 

Ramsey 

Bethalto 

Stratton 

Thos. J. Turner 

Mithra 

Hesperia 

Bollen 

Evening Star.. 
Lawn Ridge — 

Paxton 

Marseilles 

Freeburg 

Reynoldsburg. . 

Oregon 

Washburn 

Landmark 

Lanark 

Exeter 

Scottville 

Red Bud 

Sunbeam 

Chebanse 

Kendrick 

Summit 

Murray ville — 

Annawan 

Makanda 

Philo 

Chicago 

Camargo 

Sparland 

Casey. 

Hampshire 

Cave-in-Rock.. 
Chesterfield.... 

Watseka 

S. D. Monroe... 

Yates City 

Mendon 

Loami 

Bromwell 

New Hartford. . 
Maroa 



909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



53 



LODGE DUES for the year 1909.— Continued. 



rving 

fokomis 

Hazing Star 

effersonville 

'lainview 

'remont 

'almyra 

lenver ..., 

[untsville 

obden 

outh Macon 

heney's Grove — 

IcLean 

lantoul 

[endall 

.mity 

-ordon 

olumbia 

7alshville 

lanito 

Jutland 

'leiades 

Wyoming 

lomence 

■exington 

Idgewood 

lenia 

lowen 

.ndrew Jackson. . . 

lay City 

ooper 

hannon 

lartin 

iibertyville 

ower Hill 

tone Fort 

olchester 

.lma 

[urphysboro 

t. Paul 

tark 

Voodhull 

•din 

last St. Louis 

[eridian Sun 

». H. Miner 

[ome 

'arkersburg 

. D. Moody 

Vade-Barney 

Bradford 

.ndalusia 

iitchfleld 

Abraham Lincoln. 

loseville 

Lnna 

lliopolis 

lonitor 

ihatham 

Ivans 

)elia 

!ovenant 

tossville 

linooka 

idams 



455 
456 
458 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
481 
482 
484 
485 
486 
487 



490 
491 
492 
493 
495 
496 
497 
498 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
508 
509 
510 
512 
514 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 



44 in 
84 60 
20 70 
38 70 

24 30 
36 90 
5« 70 
36 00 
34 20 

55 80 
79 20 
49 50 
79 20 

73 80 
77 411 
90 90 
34 20 
43 20 
13 50 
33 30 
46 80 

664 20 
92 70 
92 70 

57 60 

45 00 

25 20 

48 60 
16 20 
75 60 

43 20 

49 50 
18 9ii 

131 40 

58 50 
69 30 
79 20 
53 10 

127 80 

225 90 

36 00 

44 10 

45 00 
275 40 

87 30 

67 50 
453 60 

31 50 

22 50 

218 70 

40 50 

56 70 

74 70 
43 20 

50 40 
97 20 

68 40 
353 70 

64 80 
387 00 

15 30 
809 10 
103 50 

47 70 

31 50 



Maquon 

Ashton 

Seneca 

Altamont 

Cuba 

Sherman 

Plainfleld 

J. R. Gorin 

Lockport 

Chatsworth . . 

Oak Park 

Stewardson ... 

Towanda 

Cordova 

Virginia , 

Valley 

Sharon 

Long Point — 
Plum River — 

Humboldt 

Dawson 

Lessing , 

Leland 

Thomson 

Madison 

Trinity 

Winslow 

Pleasant Hill. 

Albany 

Frankfort. .. 

Time 

Jacksonville.. 

Bardolph 

Gardner 

Pera 

Capron 

O'Fallon 

Viola 

Prairie City.. 
Hazel Dell.... 

DonRola 

Shirley 

Highland 

Vesper 

Fisher 

Princeton — 

Troy 

Fairmount . .. 

Gilman 

Fieldon 

Miles Hart — 
Cerro Gordo. . 

Farina 

Watson 

Clark 

Hebron 

Streator 

Piper 

Sheldon. 

Union Park .. 
Lincoln Park. 
Rock River. . 

Patoka 

Forrest 

Wadley 



5?0 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
543 
544 
547 
550 
55 i 
554 
555 
556 
557 
558 
559 
560 
562 
564 
565 
566 
567 
569 
570 
572 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
587 
588 
590 
591 
592 
595 
600 
601 
602 
603 
604 
607 
60S 
ft09 

610 
811 
612 
618 
614 
616 



44 10 
63 90 
52 20 
27 90 
66 60 

55 80 
107 10 

44 10 
109 80 

27 90 
449 10 
24 30 

22 50 

23 40 

85 50 
58 50 
71 10 
19 80 

116 10 
114 30 

45 00 
178 20 

41 40 
27 00 
22 50 
77 40 
44 10 
27 90 

63 90 

46 80 

27 00 
128 70 

29 70 
83 70 

42 30 

66 60 

46 80 

56 70 

37 80 

28 80 
31 50 

38 70 

47 70 
186 30 

31 50 

117 90 
31 50 

64 80 

67 50 
26 10 
54 90 
91 80 
50 4(1 
•J7 90 

08 10 
64 U0 

a i.< 30 

FO 80 

86 50 
858 60 
688 90 

5 4 00 
71 10 

68 80 



54 



Proceedings of the 



lodge dues FOR THE year 1909.— Continued. 



Good Hope 

Basco 

New Hope 

Hopedale 

Locust 

Union 

Tuscan 

Norton 

Ridge Farm 

E. F. W. Ellis ... 

Buckley 

Rochester 

Peotone 

Keystone 

Comet 

Apollo 

D. C. Cregier 

Oblong City 

San Jose 

Somonauk 

Blueville 

Camden 

Atwood 

Greenview 

Yorktown 

Mozart 

Lafayette 

Rock" Island 

Lambert 

Grand Chain 

South Park 

Mayo 

BeecherCity 

Crawford 

Erie 

Burnt Prairie.. . 

Herder 

Fillmore 

Eddyville 

Normal ".. . ., 

Waldeck 

Pawnee 

A. O. Fay 

Enfield 

Buffalo Prairie.. 

Clement 

Morrisonville 

Blue Mound 

Burnside , 

Galatia 

Rio 

Garfield 

Orangeville 

Clifton 

Englewood 

Iola 

Raymond 

Herrin's Prairie. 

ShilohHill 

Belle Rive 

Richard Cole... . 

Hutton 

Pleasant Plains.. 

Temple Hill 

Alexandria 

Braidwood 



617 


$ 58 50 


618 


15 30 


62i) 


18 90 


622 


51 30 


623 


27 00 


627 


21 60 


630 


47 70 


631 


45 90 


632 


83 70 


633 


147 60 


634 


16 20 


635 


30 60 


636 


65 70 


639 


351 00 


641 


54 00 


642 


461 70 


643 


501 30 


644 


83 70 


645 


29 70 


646 


87 30 


647 


51 30 


648 


83 70 


651 


63 90 


653 


72 00 


655 


82 80 


656 


87 30 


657 


21 60 


658 


222 30 


659 


247 50 


660 


26 10 


662 


299 70 


664 


22 50 


665 


29 70 


666 


44 10 


667 


48 60 


668 


42 30 


669 


230 40 


670 


54 90 


672 


27 00 


673 


71 10 


674 


234 90 


675 


85 50 


676 


181 80 


677 


57 60 


679 


75 60 


680 


54 90 


681 


68 40 


682 


83 70 


683 


74 70 


684 


47 70 


685 


79 20 


686 


696 60 


687 


45 00 


688 


54 00 


690 


782 10 


691 


23 40 


692 


53 10 


693 


120 60 


695 


30 60 


696 


34 20 


697 


406 80 


698 


45 90 


700 


62 10 


701 


24 30 


702 


74 70 


704 


184 50 



Ewing 

Joppa . , 

Star 

Farmer City 

Providence 

Collinsville 

Johnsonville 

Collison 

Elvaston 

Calumet 

Arcana 

May 

Chapel Hill , 

Rome 

Walnut 

Omaha 

Chandlerville 

Rankin 

Golden Rule 

Raritam 

Waterman . .. . 

Lake Creek 

Eldorado 

Harbor , 

Carman 

Gibson 

Morning Star. 

Sheridan 

Arrowsmith 

Saunemin 

Lakeside 

New Holland 

Danvers 

Scott Land 

Goode 

Winnebago 

Weldon 

Centennial 

Alta 

Akin. 

Lyndon. 

Lounsbury . 

Allendale. 

Ogden 

Pre-emption. 

Hardinsville. 

Verona. 

Mystic Star. 

Orel. 

Sibley 

Van Meter. 

Crete. 

Sullivan 

Palace 

Littleton 

Triluminar 

Mizpah 

St. Elmo 

LaGrange 

Bay City 

New Burnside... 

Mansfield 

Lake View 

Grand Crossing. 

Ravenswood 

Gurney 



909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



oo 



LODGE DUES FOR THE year 1909.— Continued. 



Fright's Grove. . 

iloam 

'otomac 

onstantia , 

ieacon Light 

:iverton Union. . 

lorris 

.erna 

.uburn Park.. . . 

Ittsfield 

iroadlands 

alhoun 

.. T. Darrah 

admor 

[yrtle 

:. M. Husted 

rormalPark 

idell 

olf ax 

[enwood 

angamon 

Tiliiamson 

reponset 

Zensinsrton 

i. M. Dalzell 

leoo 

loyal 

ofnland 

riUham 

'racv 

leivin 

)eLand 

[umboldt Park. . 

»hio 

,awn 

:idgv%-ay 

real Springs. . .. 

Sen Hur 

'olumbian 

lenderson 

rew Canton 

ielknap 

•earl 

l-rove 

.rthur 

lazon 

equoit 

^dgar 

'.ockport 

"indlay 

larvey 

)ean 

'oledo 

'riple 

Windsor Park. . 

tindsboro 

'harity 

terwvn , 

tlto Pass 

Voodland Park 

"ides 

'ark 

lartontoo 

Jluffs 



779 


5387 90 


780 


381 60 


782 


66 60 


783 


234 00 


784 


122 40 


r^ 


77 40 


787 


72 90 


788 


45 90 


789 


399 60 


790 


96 30 


791 


6>J 30 


792 


34 20 


798 


36 00 


794 


24 30 


795 


238 50 


796 


60 30 


797 


516 60 


798 


48 60 


799 


43 20 


800 


611 10 


801 


39 60 


802 


88 20 


803 


39 60 


804 


233 10 


805 


101 70 


806 


48 60 


807 


31 50 


808 


61 20 


809 


34 20 


810 


151 20 


811 


49 50 


812 


27 00 


813 


449 10 


814 


19 80 


815 


157 50 


816 


35 10 


817 


56 70 


818 


285 30 


819 


337 50 


820 


52 20 


821 


54 90 


822 


63 00 


823 


54 00 


824 


126 00 


825 


54 90 


826 


71 10 


827 


71 10 


829 


58 50 


830 


47 70 


831 


77 40 


832 


150 30 


833 


44 10 


834 


64 80 


835 


68 40 


836 


210 60 


837 


81 00 


838 


37 80 


839 


130 50 


840 


37 80 


841 


441 90 


842 


153 00 


843 


353 7.1 


845 


46 80 


846 


35 10 



Stronghurst 

London 

Palestine 

Anstin 

Chicago Heights 

Gothic 

Latham 

Brighton Park , 

King Oscar 

West Gate 

BoydD 

Utica 

Apple River 

Metropolitan 

Sorento 

Riverside 

St. Andrews 

Olvmpia 

St. Cecilia I 

West Salem ! 

Chadvrick I 

Cornell | 

May wood 

Lostant , ... 

Areenta . . ., 

Free Will 

Standard 

Nifong 

Cornerstone 

William McKinlev 

Granite Cifv 

:Equitv — 

Composite 

John B. Sherman 

Marissa 

Boulevard 

Wheeler 

Bethany 

Villa Grove 

Hooppole 

Pyramid 

Damascus 

America 

Des Piaines 

Logan Square 

Constellation 

Loraine 

Utopia 

Crescent 

Kosmos 

Ogden Park 

Silvis 

jParkManor 

'Carnation 

iEdeewater 

Alto 

Elkhart 

jCarlock 

Hanover 

'Coffeen 

Ancient Craft 

Gil. W. Barnard 

Bee Hive 

[Hull 



S73 
874 
875 
876 
877 
878 
879 
880 
881 
882 
883 
884 
885 

887 
v-- 
889 
890 
891 
892 
893 
894 
895 
B96 
B97 



900 
901 
9( 2 
903 
904 

BOB 

907 
908 
909 
910 



847 


38 70 


848 


36 00 


849 


51 30 


850 


459 CO 


851 


130 50 


852 


183 60 


853 


56 70 


854 


159 30 


855 


413 10 


856 


37 80 


857 


56 70 


858 


24 30 


859 


43 i0 


860 


332 10 


861 


9 9G 


862 


72 00 


863 


272 70 


864 


342 90 


865 


211 50 


866 


38 70 


867 


54 tO 


868 


25 20 


869 


185 40 


870 


35 10 


871 


59 40 


872 


36 00 



33 30 
240 30 
209 70 

102 60 

184 50 
171 90 
178 20 

39 60 

266 40 

2) 70 

34 20 
58 50 

18 00 
37 80 
95 40 

264 60 
61 20 

185 10 
213 30 

33 30 
105 30 
144 90 

103 50 
109 80 

42 30 
13v 60 

85 60 
144 90 

19 M 
29 70 
27 90 
80 CO 
13 60 

18 00 

42 80 
88 10 



56 Proceedings of the (October 12, 



Dues Previous to 1909. 

Lodge No. Lodge No. 

95 $ 90 517 

169 90 521 

578 



592 
623 
701 
702 
721 
724 
735 
744 
759 



. $ 


90 


2 


70 


4 


50 


25 


20 




90 




90 


70 


20 




90 




90 


4 


50 


1 


80 




90 


2 


70 


3 


60 




90 




90 




90 




90 



199 82 80 

203 90 

207 90 

209 1 80 

222 .. 90 

252 1 80 

265 1 80 

272 90 

279 90 

313 90 

314 90 

344 47 70 768 

385 .. 90 784 

398 2 70 801 

408 1 80 804 

431 1 80 823 

486 1 80 833 

492 90 $278 10 

Dues from Lodges Under Dispensation. 

Sept. 1, 1909, Bellflower $ 15 30 

Sept. 1, 1909, Stellar 27 00 

Sept. 1, 1909, Aaron 54 90 

Sept. 1, 1909, Sesser 13 50 

Sept. 1, 1909, Elwood 9 90 

Sept. 1, 1909, Republic 22 50 

Sept. 1, 1909, Cottonwood 7 20 

Sept. 1, 1909, Jackson Park 15 30 

Sept. 1, 1909, Welcome 21 60 

Sept. 1, 1909, Concord .14 40 

$201 60 

Dispensation Fees. 

Elwood Lodge, U.D $100 00 

Republic Lodge, U.D 100 00 

Cottonwood Lodge, U.D 100 00 

Jackson Park Lodge, U.D 100 00 

Welcome Lodge, U.D 100 00 

Concord Lodge, U.D 100 00 

$600 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

CHARITY FUND. 

Defunct Lodge dues $ 30 40 

Dues collected previous to 1909 108 15 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 57 

Dues collected for 1909 33,454 75 

Dues collected from Lodges U.D 78 40 

Jacot bequest 2500 00 

Unexpended balance I.M.O.H 1400 94 

Interest on City of Chicago bonds 280 00 

Interest on Cook County bonds 160 00 

Dividend on Temple stock 24 00 

$38,036 64 

General Fund. 

Error 1908 $ 20 

Dues previous to 1909 169 95 

Dues Lodges U.D 123 20 

Dues for 1909 52,571 75 

Blue Books I8 60 

Proceedings . 1 00 

Ceremonials 6 50 

Produce on Home Farm 589 86 

Sale Butler property 233 99 

A. H. Bell, dispensations, etc 153 00 

Dispensation fees Lodges U.D 600 00 

Bathe note 1,000 00 

Transfer from Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home... 776 28 

Ret. settlement Miller Bros 1 07 

Ret. balance Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home lots.. 200 00 

$56,445 40 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home Fund. 

Interest on Sanitary bonds $ S00 00 

Interest on Illinois Central Bonds 100 00 

Interest on Illinois Central Reg. bonds 600 00 

Interest on N. Chicago bonds 400 00 

Interest on Government bonds 40 00 

Interest on City of Chicago bonds 600 00 

Interest on Cook County bonds 480 00 

Interest on Mattoon bonds 320 00 

Payment Rayner note 10,000 00 

Interest Rayner note 450 00 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home Ass'n 112 50 

To care Brooken children 112 50 

Donations 13 on 

$14.02^ 00 



58 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Home for the Aged Fund. 

Interest on Illinois Central bonds $ 40 00 

Interest on City of Chicago bonds 300 00 

Interest on Wabash Railroad bonds 60 00 

Interest on Cook County bonds 20 00 

$420 00 

Illinois Masonic Home Fund. 

C. S. Gurney $55 65 

Donation 5 00 

$60 65 
All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary. 

The R.W. Grand Secretary asked that his report, together 
with his cash book and ledger be referred to the Committee 
on Finance. 

It was so ordered. 

KEP0ET— Committee on Correspondence. 
M.W. Bro. Edward Cook, Committee on Correspondence, 
presented his report, and asked that it be printed in the Pro- 
ceedings. 

It was so ordered. 

KEP0ET— Committee on Grand Master's Address. 
Bro. James E. Wooters. Chairman of the Committee on 
Grand Master's Address, presented the report of this Com- 
mittee. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons of the State of Illinois: 

Your Committee to which was referred the Grand Master's ad- 
dress, desire to report that we have carefully examined the same and 
make the following recommendations : 

(1) We desire to congratulate the Most Worshipful Grand 
Master and the Grand Lodge on the thorough and business-like man- 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 59 

ner in which the Grand Master has reported his doings for the past 
year and his recommendations to the Grand Lodge and to its Com- 
mittees. 

The report shows that Masonry in our grand jurisdiction is in a 
most flourishing condition and that peace and harmony prevail within 
our borders. 

So much of the address as relates to the institution of new lodges 
we recommend be referred to the Committee on Lodges U.D. 

The part relating to lodges constituted, we recommend be referred 
to the Committee on Chartered Lodges. 

So much of the report as refers to revenue is referred to the 
Committee on Finance. 

In so much of the report as refers to schools of instruction, we 
commend the Grand Master for his success in maintaining the high 
character of these schools to the end that the ritualistic work of 
Masonry may be uniform throughout our jurisdiction. 

In the appointment of the Committee on Correspondence, we feel 
that the appointment of Bro. Edward Cook, as the Committee on 
Correspondence, to complete the work of our deceased brother, Joseph 
Robbins, was a most appropriate selection. 

The painstaking care of the present administration is well shown in 
the perfecting of our corporate name as "The Most Worshipful Grand 
Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois." 

So much of the Grand Master's address as refers to charters re- 
newed, appointment of Grand Chaplain, and installation of Grand 
Orator and Grand Steward, we recommend be approved by the Grand 
Lodge. 

It appears from the present address, that certain parts of the 
Grand Master's address of last year were overlooked. We, therefore, 
recommend that the matter of the removal of Murrayville Lodge No. 
432 from Murrayville to Woodson, in Morgan county, be referred to 
the Committee on Chartered Lodges, and that the question of dispensa- 
tions issued and denied be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, 
and that the matter in last year's address, under the head of "Appeals 
to The Grand Lodge" be again referred to the Committee on Appeals 
and Grievances, with the request that they report. 

We recommend that those parts of the address which refer to our 
deceased brethren be referred to the Committee on Obituaries. 

So much of the address as refers to new lodges, we recommend be 
referred to the special Committee on New Lodges, previously appointed. 



60 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

We recommend that the suggestions in regard to the laying of cor- 
ner stones be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. 

We recommend that the action of the Most Worshipful Grand 
Master, in his efforts to protect the interests of the Grand Lodge in 
requiring a proper form of surety bond for Grand Lodge officers be 
approved and we concur in his recommendation that the by-laws be so 
amended as to require the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer to give 
bonds with good personal security. 

In regard to so much of the report as refers to the case of Clinton 
Lodge No. 19, Petersburg, Illinois, and the question on "How to Vote 
on Motion to Suspend," we recommend be referred to the Committee 
on Jurisprudence. 

The Grand Master's address shows that the affairs of our Masonic 
homes during the past year have been administered in a careful and 
commendable way, and we recommend that the Grand Lodge approve 
the action of the Grand Master and the board of trustees of the Illinois 
Masonic homes in the purchase of a site for the Masonic Orphans' 
Home at La Grange. 

We recommend that the matter of "Deficit in Appropriation for the 
Masonic home at Sullivan'' be referred to the Finance Committee. 

In the matter relating to the discovery and sale of real estate at 
Butler, Illinois, we congratulate the Grand Lodge on the diligence of 
the Most Worshipful Grand Master and Bro. D. W. Starr in realizing 
so well on long-forgotten property, and we recommend to succeeding 
Grand Masters that strict search and due inquiry be made to the end 
that future discoveries may be brought to light, and we recommend 
that the action of the Grand Master in reference to the sale of this 
property be ratified. 

It is no doubt pleasing to the fraternity in Illinois to know that 
at the conference of Grand Masters held at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
in June last, our grand jurisdiction was so ably represented by our 
present Most Worshipful Grand Master, and that he took a prominent 
part in shaping the conclusions of that conference. While the forming 
of a national Grand Lodge is at this time unnecessary, and is perhaps 
not seriously considered by any Grand Lodge, yet there are many 
questions of common interest among the grand jurisdictions which 
may profitably be considered at such conferences. We recommend that 
so much of the address as deals with proposed changes in our methods 
of procedure resulting from the Philadelphia conference, be referred 
to the Committee on Jurisprudence. 

We congratulate the Grand Master on his being able to secure 
the first returns made by Western Star Lodge No. 107 of Kaskaskia, 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 61 

Illinois, to the Right Worshipful Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, dated 
December, 1806, and for his thoughtfulness in having the same dupli- 
cated in exact form and size. 

So much of the address as relates to a permanent home for the 
Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois, we recommend be referred to a special com- 
mittee of five to be appointed by the Grand Master with directions to 
report at the next session of the Grand Lodge. 

In conclusion, we recommend that the thanks of this Grand Lodge 
be extended to our retiring Most Worshipful Grand Master, Alex- 
ander Hamilton Bell, for the able, painstaking and punctual manner 
in which he has presided over its deliberations and administered its 
affairs for the past two years. He has brought to the discharge of 
his high duties a singleness of purpose, a zeal for the good of 
Masonry, and a clear-sighted business sagacity, the influence of which 
will be lasting and of incalcuable value. To have filled the station of 
Most Worshipful Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
of the State of Illinois with ability and success, is in itself a very high 
honor, but to retire from this high office with a universal love and 
commendation of the craft throughout this grand jurisdiction is a 
distinction which may well gratify the most exalted ambition. 

As a Past Grand Master, we hope that Brother Bell may bring to 
this Grand Lodge for many years to come, his counsel and advice, and 
we assure him that the memory of his service to us will remain bright 
and lasting as the years go by. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. E. Wooters, 
J. M. Hannum, 
H. L. Browning, 
Committee on Grand Masters Address. 

On motion it was adopted. 

MOTION- To Proceed with the Election. 
On motion of Bro. John C. Weis, the Grand Lodge voted 
to proceed with the election of officers. 

The Grand Master announced that the District Deputy 
Grand Masters would act as collecting- and distributing tellers, 
and the following brothers as counting tellers : 

John C. W r cis, Charles Burkhart, llany A. Dever, Vrthur Wood. 
E. R. Welch. 



62 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

EEPORT-Trustees of Masonic Home. 
M.W. Bro. Owen Scott, President of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Masonic Home, presented the report. 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

At a meeting of the Board held at the close of the Grand Lodge 
in 1908, officers were elected for the ensuing year as follows : 

President — Owen Scott. 

Vice-President — George M. Moulton. 

Treasurer — James A. Steele. 

Secretary — C. S. Gurney. 

Executive Committees for the Homes were : At Sullivan — Owen 
Scott, James A. Steele and Henry W. Berks. At Chicago — George M. 
Moulton, R. J. Daly and Thomas E. Miller. 

Sullivan, 

The past year has been one of growth and development in the 
Home. The occupancy of the new building at Sullivan with its added 
facilities for the care of the helpless, has increased the membership from 
48 to 76, a gain of over 63 per cent. Among these were a considerable 
number who require constant attention. At all times as many as from 
eight to ten have been in the Men's Hospital department, necessitating 
the employment of two nurses the entire time. Three of these in the 
hospital were totally blind. Other infirmities than the loss of sight 
have made it necessary that many should have attention day and night. 
One serious operation, strangulated hernia, was a necessity to save the 
life of the brother, aged 83. This was successful and he has for months 
been able to return to his room and go about the premises. In almost 
every case those who have been placed under the care of the hospital 
department have improved perceptibly. Of course in some instances 
improvement was impossible, as they were hopeless invalids when they 
entered. 

Among the women there has been less serious sickness than among 
the men, but it has been necessary to have the services of a nurse the 
entire time. Fewer deaths have occurred than during previous years, 
attributable to better hospital facilities and better attention. Mrs. Bald- 
win made a dying request that her thanks to the Grand Lodge and Ma- 
sons of Illinois be expressed. Of necessity, the expenses in the medical 
department have materially increased. The extreme age and consequent 
infirmity of almost the entire membership has required more frequent 



1909- ) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 63 

visits from the Home physician and larger expense for medicines and 
hospital supplies. Most of those who enter are either aged and infirm, 
or, if younger, enter because of chronic sickness or other condition 
which disqualifies them for self-support. The Board has gone on the 
theory that this grand body would not spare any expense or labor for 
the relief or comfort of our aged and infirm wards. With plenty of 
wholesome food it has been almost the universal experience that brothers 
who come to the Home improve in appearance and health. 

One other condition that has prevailed during the past year will be 
recognized by the members of this Grand Lodge. Every item of living 
has materially advanced in price, this increase being at least 25 per cent. 
Almost every kind of food and every article of clothing has taken wings 
and soared. Flour and meat, the staples of living, have almost doubled 
in cost. Clothing has sharply advanced. In consequence of this, the 
ordinary expenses of the Home have grown in proportion. By increase 
in membership, by taking in the more helpless who formerly could not 
be received, and by the decided increase in the cost of food and cloth- 
ing, it has been made impossible to keep within the amount set apart 
by the Grand Lodge one year ago. It also became necessary to employ 
additional help in caring for the increased membership, adding mate- 
rially to the cost of maintenance. By reason of the generally enfeebled 
condition of the members it has been impossible to count on very much 
service from them in caring for buildings and grounds. Almost every- 
thing must be done by those hired for that purpose. The Board is glad, 
however, to recognize the fact that a few have been able and willing to 
lend a hand. From these considerations we are obliged to ask for a 
larger appropriation for the coming year. We feel sure that there is 
not a brother in the state who would not be willing, if necessary, to 
add a small sum to the pittance he now pays to the charity fund of this 
Grand Lodge for the support of our helpless and dependent brothers, 
their wives, widows and orphans. 

Chicago. 

Of the Orphans' Home little need be said concerning its condition 
and management. It is, as heretofore, going on without jar or friction. 
The children, numbering 56, are well and happy. Under the careful 
nurture and training of Bro. and Mrs. Bassett, they are growing into a 
beautiful and useful manhood and womanhood. The number has in- 
creased over last year. Our last report showed 40; now there arc 56 
The admissions have more than equalled the loss of those who go out 
into families or retire because of age limt. 



64 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

The New Home Building. 

Pursuant to the authority granted to your Board at the last session, 
a suitable site has been procured and purchased. It is located at La- 
Grange, Cook county, thirteen miles west of Chicago, on the main line 
of the C, B. & Q. Railroad. It is a tract of land containing between 
three and four acres within the corporate limits of the city, with a 
paved street on each of the four sides. Water, light, power and proper 
sewer connections are adequate to all needs. School and church privi- 
leges are abundant, and of excellent quality. Your board spent consid- 
erable time in visiting various sites and locations in Chicago and Cook- 
county, and feel that the Grand Lodge is very fortunate in securing so 
excellent a location as that at LaGrange. Of the sum of $20,000 appro- 
priated for the purchase of the site and for preliminary plans* for build- 
ing about $11,000 were used. The balance remains to be drawn upon for 
future needs. We have employed Deal & Ginzel, of Lincoln, 111., as the 
architects, and plans and specifications have been drawn for the new 
building. Your Board of Trustees has planned to let the contract for 
this structure as early as possible after the necessary authority has been 
given by this body. This will enable the completion of the building by 
the time the lease on our temporary quarters expires. In planning for 
the new building, we have looked to the future as well as to the present. 
The proposed structure will be entirely fire proof and of sufficient size 
to accommodate all children who are likely to need our care and 
maintenance for all time to come. No attempt has been made for un- 
necessary ornamentation or display. The building as planned will be a 
handsome structure, a credit to the craft and one that will provide every 
comfort and convenience. We estimate the entire cost of building to 
be about $100,000. From the sale of the old building we realized $35,000, 
leaving about $24,000 to be used toward the new. As there is in the 
permanent fund of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home a little over 
$40,000 available for this purpose, it will not require much encroachment 
upon the general funds of the Grand Lodge. The $49,000 required to 
be kept intact under the terms of the transfer from the private corpo- 
ration to this Grand Lodge, will thus not be disturbed. Only the avail- 
able surplus need' be used. It will be seen from this statement that a 
large part of the entire cost of the new Home at LaGrange can be met 
by the money realized from the sale of the old building and the free 
surplus from the general funds of the Orphans' Home. We estimate 
that the additional sum will not exceed $40,000. 

We therefore recommend that the Board of Trustees be authorized 
to construct the building as per plans and specifications herewith sub- 
mitted, and that the sum of $100,000 be appropriated as indicated. 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 65 

The Superintendents. 

Bro. Charles L. Hovey, at Sullivan, and Bro. C. E. Bassett, at Chi- 
cago, have continued in charge of the Homes during the past year with 
the success that has attended them in the past. Nothing needs to be said 
of their efficiency and usefulness in caring for the children at Chicago 
and our brethren, their wives and widows at Sullivan. At Sullivan one 
or more orphans of this state have been kept during the year. 

Reports of Officers of Board. 

Herewith are presented the reports of the Superintendents, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, together with the report of a special accountant 
who has verified the financial statements made. We ask that these sev- 
eral statements be made a part of our report and so printed in the pro- 
ceedings. Information is given so fully in these reports, that we do not 
deem it necessary to attempt to give further details. 

We recommend that the following appropriations be made : 

For Construction of Orphans' Home $100,000 

For Maintenance of Orphans' Home 12,000 

For Maintenance of Home at Sullivan 24,000 

For improvement on the 224 acres of the farm outside of Home 

grounds of 40 acres, the rent from the farm, etc 1,120 

Fraternally submitted, 

Owen Scott, 
Geo. M. Moulton, 
Alexander H. Bell, 
A. B. Ashley, 
Thos. E. Miller, 
James A. Steele, 
Henry W. Berks, 
Robert J. Daly, 

Committee. 

REPORT- Of Executive Committee Orphan's Home. 

To the President, Board of Trustees, Illinois Masonic Homes: 

The Executive Committee in charge of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' 

Home in Chicago, fraternally reports that its affairs have been conducted 

effectively and harmoniously, so far as known, during the past year in 

the temporary quarters now occupied by the Home. 

The Superintendent and Matron have rendered constant, valued anrf 

efficient service. The health of the members has been uniformly gOoH 

-5 



66 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

and Dr. Sweet, the Home Physician for so many years, has been unre- 
mitting in his professional care of the family at the Home. Dr. Plat- 
tenberg has taken care of the dental work with his accustomed fidelity 
and at a minimum cost. 

The Committee has held regular meetings each month, with some 
one member giving personal supervision to the administrative details at 
all times. We are pleased to report that expenditures have been kept 
within the limit of the appropriation made for the operation of the Home. 
The Superintendent has submitted an exhaustive report which is 
transmitted herewith and which contains much of interest to the breth- 
ren of Illinois who make this practical exemplification of Masonic char- 
ity and fraternal love possible in our midst. 

The Committee express the earnest hope that the requisite appro- 
priation for the erection of a suitable permanent Home to accommodate 
at least one hundred members will be made by the M.W. Grand Lodge 
at its forthcoming Annual Communication, thereby placing on the beau- 
tiful site already secured in LaGrange, that attractive suburb of Chi- 
cago, an enduring monument to Ancient Craft Masonry by the brethren 
of Illinois, whose glory will never dim, nor luster fade away. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Geo. M. Moulton, 
Robert J. Daly, 
Thomas E. Miller, 

Committee. 

REPORT— Of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

Sullivan Home, 
receipts. 

Grand Lodge, maintenance account $25,218 09 

Refund of estimate Building No. 2 376 09 

. $25,594 18 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Provisions $8,534 76 

Labor 1,29S 87 

Clothing 1,135 29 

Salaries 4,240 89 

Repairs 1,519 45 

Medical 2,081 92 

Printing, stationery and postage 183 96 

Traveling expense 104 26 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 67 

Furnishings 2,558 82 

Superintendent's sundries 238 90 

Lighting 181 82 

Fuel 1,428 06 

General sundries 94 50 

Improvements, buildings and grounds... 595 00 

Feed, for stock 570 55 

Live stock 125 00 

Construction account 316 40 

Machinery 12 00 

School account 30 64 

Funerals, expense of 125 00 

Insurance on contents 75 00 

$25,451 09 



Superintendent's balance Oct. 1, 1909. .$ 211 45 
Superintendent's balance Oct. 1, 1908.. 376 16 



164 71 
$25,286 38 



Balance $ 307 SO 

Overdraft 218 09 



Treasurer's balance October 1, 1909 $ 89 71 

Chicago Home. 



Grand Lodge, maintenance account $10,000 00 

Sale of old material 14 66 

Construction account 500 00 



$10,514 66 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Provisions $3,067 88 

Clothing 728 67 

Salaries 1,760 00 

Labor 1,574 24 

Superintendent's sundries 1,277 70 

Repairs 272 53 

Furnishings 195 63 

Printing, stationery and postage 17 53 

School account 71 99 

Medical 67 46 

Traveling expense 105 07 



68 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Fuel 859 76 

General sundries 62 34 

Refund to Grand Lodge— 1908 balance.. 1,400 94 
Construction account 36 70 

— ■ $11,498 44 



Superintendent's balance, October, 1909.. $172 12 
Superintendent's balance, October, 1908.. 35 93 



136 19 

$11,634 63 



Balance # $1,119 97 

Treasurer's balance, October 1, 1908 1,400 94 

Treasurer's balance October 1, 1909 $280 97 

C. S. Gurney, Secretary. 
Sullivan, III. 

REPORT— Of Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. 
To the Board of Trustees: 

Brethren : Your Treasurer herewith submits his annual report of 
Receipts and Disbursements on account of 

Illinois Masonic Home, at Sullivan, III. 

1908. receipts. 

Balance on hand last report $ 1,561 44 

Oct. 2. From C. S. Gurney. 14 66 

Nov. 5. From C. S. Gurney 2,500 00 

1909. 

Jan. 14. From C. S. Gurney 2,500 00 

March 1. From C. S. Gurney 2,500 00 

May 25. From C. S. Gurney 2,500 00 

June 11. From C. S. Gurney, Building Fund 500 00 

$12,076 10 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Vouchers Nos. 4493 to 4585 (except 4581) $11,792 13 

Jas. A. Steele, Tr. Sund. account 77 66 

Balance on hand 206 31 

$12,076 10 

Sept. 29, 1909. Balance on hand $206 31 

James A. Steele, Treas. 
Sullivan, III. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 69 

To the Board of Trustees: 

Brethren : Your Treasurer herewith submits his annual report of 
Receipts and Disbursements on account of 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home, at Chicago, III. 
1908. receipts. 

To balance, last report _....$ 158 98 

Nov. 5. From C. S. Gurney, Clerk 218 09 

Nov. 5. From C. S. Gurney, Clerk 5,000 00 

1909. 

Jan. 14. From C. S. Gurney, Clerk. 5,000 00 

Mch. 1. From C. S. Gurney, Clerk 5,000 00 

Mch. 27. Voucher No. 136, Cld 376 09 

May 25. From C. S. Gurney, Clerk 5,000 00 

Aug. 10. From C. S. Gurney, Clerk 5,000 00 



$25,753 16 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Vouchers Nos. 136 and 592 to 745, inclusive (except Nos. 

737 and 738) 24,689 13 

Jas. A. Steele, Treas., to balance sundries account 77 74 

Balance on hand 986 29 

$25,753 16 

Sept. 29, 1909. Balance on hand $ 9S6 29 

Special Fund 62 68 

Charity Fund 77 74 

$1,120 71 
Error, 1907 1 2 00 



$1,114 71 
James A. Steele. Treas. 

Sullivan, III., October 8, L909. 
This is to certify that the books of this bank show a balance to the 
credit of James A. Steele, Treasurer of Illinois Masonic Home, Sulli- 



70 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

van, of $206.31 ; and to his credit as Treasurer of Illinois Masonic Or- 
phans' Home, Chicago, $986.29; on September 29, 1909. 

W. A. Steele, President. 

Jas. A. Steele, Treas., Sullivan account, $206.31. 
Jas. A. Steele, Treas., Chicago account, $986.29. 

REPORT— Of Accountant for the Board of Trustees. 

Chicago, October 8, 1909. 
Hon. Owen Scott, President Board of Trustees, Illinois Masonic Homes, 

Decatur, III.: 

Sir : — I herewith submit the following report as the result of my 
examination of the books and records of the Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Illinois Masonic ( Homes for the year ending September 30, 1909 : 

Secretary's Record, Chicago Home. 

Balance on hand September 30, 1908 $ 1,400 94 

Receipts from all sources, Oct. 1, '08, to Sept. 30, '09 10,514 66 

$11,915 60 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

As per voucher Oct. 1, 1908, to Sept. 30, 1909 $11,634 63 

Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1909 280 97 

$11,915 60 
Sullivan Home. 

Overdraft Sept. 30, 1908 $ 218 09 

Receipts from all sources Oct. 1, '08, to Sept. 30, '09 25,594 18 

$25,376 09 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

As per voucher Oct. 1, '08, to Sept. 30, '09 $25,286 38 

Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1909 89 71 

$25,376 09 

Secretary's balance, Chicago Home $ 280 97 

Treasurer's balance, Chicago Home $206 31 

Credit to Sullivan Home by error, 1907 12 00 

Children Christmas Fund not passed through Secre- 
tary's books 77 66 

Corrected Treasurer's balance 295 97 



1909 -) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 71 

Secretary's balance, Sullivan Home 89 71 

Treasurer's balance, Sullivan Home $986 29 

Credit Sullivan Home, by error, 1907 12 00 

$974 29 
Special Fund, 1907, $62.68; Children's Christmas 
Fund, 1908, $77.74, not passed through Secretary's 

books 140 42 

Treasurer's corrected balance 1,114 71 

Treasurer's balance, Chicago Home 295 97 

Secretary's balance, Chicago Home 280 97 



$15 00 

Treasurer's balance, Sullivan Home $1,114 71 

Secretary's balance, Sullivan Home 89 71 



$1,025 00 

The difference between the Secretary's balance and the Treasurer's 
balance, Chicago Home, is caused by warrant No. 4586, for $15, being 
unpaid at the close of business. 

The difference between the Secretary's balance and Treasurer's bal- 
ance, Sullivan Home, is caused by warrant No. 737, for $1,025, being un- 
paid at close of business. Respectfully yours, 

C. A. Forshee, Accountant. 

REPORT— Of Superintendent Orphan's Home. 

Chicago, September 20, 1909. 

To the President and Members of the Board of Trustees, Illinois Ma- 
sonic Homes: 
Gentlemen : — The following report of the general condition of the 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home in Chicago is respectfully submitted : 
For the information of those concerned it is proper to note that, 

under the system of renumbering the buildings on some of the streets by 

the city of Chicago, the Home on Bishop Court is now known as 23 

and 25 instead of 14 and 16. 

The year has not been an eventful one in the Home. Nothing o\ 
an unusual character has occurred; and incidents of an annoying na- 
ture — if we except the trouble in trying to get competent help— have 
been at a low minimum. Having passed the first winter in the present 
Home we are able to state that onr predictions of one year ago, regard 
ing the comforts of the place, have been verified. 



72 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

We have experienced an unusual amount of difficulty in trying to 
get efficient help. Although the weekly payroll has shown but six names 
at any one time, we have found it necessary to employ twenty-seven 
different persons in filling the six positions during the year. 

We have cause to be thankful for the good health that has pre- 
vailed in the Home. The children, as a whole, have attended school 
without interruption. Dr. Sweet, who has been freely called to pre- 
scribe for individual cases, has promptly responded, his instructions 
have been carried out, and the necessary care has been given, without 
any extra expense to the Home. None of the children have been 
called to that "bourne from which no traveler returns." 

The children continue to attend Divine services at the Ada Street 
M. E. church. Their record in the public school is very gratifying. 
"Among the good things that have come to us during the year are the 
children from the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home." Such was the 
announcement made by Miss M. M. Niehaus, principal of the Brown 
school, at the graduating exercises held last June. Five members of 
the Home graduated from the eighth grade at that time, with credit to 
themselves and the approval and good-will of their teachers : Namely, 
Hazel Park, Carolyn Kernahan, George Mackie, Edward Kemp and 
Conrad Houle. Four of these graduates have since left the Home; 
two of them to continue their school work, and two of them to work 
for their daily bread. 

The following events have been enjoyed by the children during the 
year : 

Annual meeting of Veteran Masons of Illinois at Medinah Tem- 
ple. Free bus furnished by kindness F. Parmelee Company. 

Five entertainments at Ada Street M. E. church. 

Christmas at the Home, provided by the Ladies of the Christmas 
Committee. The usual Christmas entertainment was dispensed with for 
want of room, but the event was home-like and very pleasant. Most 
worshipful Brother Moulton and Worshipful Brother Daly of the 
Executive Committee were present. 

Five motion picture entertainments at the theater. 

A sleighride lasting two hours. 

Barnum & Bailey's circus at the Coliseum. 

Annual basket picnic given by Dearborn Lodge at Cedar Lake, Ind. 

Annual picnic given at Columbia Park by the lodges, Royal Arch 
and Eastern Star Chapters of Cook county. 

Annual picnic at Desplaines given by York Chapter. 

At all these Masonic picnics free transportation to and from the 
grounds, as well as an abundance of refreshments, were included in the 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 73 

invitations. Our children participated in the racing events and secured 
their full share of prizes. 

Annual automobile ride around the park system of Chicago lasting 
four hours, by the kindness of Chicago Automobile Club, Chicago 
Automobile Trade Association and Chicago Motor Club. 

A ride to and from Michigan City, Ind., on the steamer "Roose- 
velt." This courtesy was extended by Brother W. K. Greenebaum, 
general manager of the Indiana Transportation Company. 

Five professional baseball games at the parks of the American and 
National Leagues, due to courtesies extended by Presidents Comiskey 
and Murphy through Most Worshipful Brother Moulton. 

We have acknowledged with thanks the following donations : 

A box of oranges and a box of sweet apples from Mr. L. J. 
Kunze. 

Forty library books in good condition, and a box of candy canes 
from Mrs. Clapp. 

Fifty pounds cooked meat, etc. from Rose Croix Chapter 409, 
O. E. S. 

The population of the Home has been greater than last year, and 
the cost of necessities has increased, but we have been able to keep 
within the amount appropriated for maintenance, without any falling 
off in the care of the children. The winter's supply of coal is in the 
bins, and all bills are paid up to date. 

Superintendent's Fund, 
receipts. 

Balance on hand Oct. 1, 1908 $ 35.93 

Received from Treasurer since 5,500.00 

$5,535.93 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Provisions $1,809.17 

Clothing 178.06 

Labor 1,574.2-4 

School 71.99 

Medical 67.46 

Home Furnishings 1 64.2 1 

Repairs 212.30 

Fuel ■ 7.75 

Sundries 1,81 : .70 

Balance unexpended L72.12 

$5,5 



74 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Christmas Fund, 
receipts. 

Balance Sarah A. Eddy Fund $ 21.77 

Balance Austin Lodge Fund 14.97 

Lincoln Park Chapter No. 177 20.00 

Waubansia Lodge No. 160 10.00 

Delavan Lodge No. 156 5.00 

J. A. Steele, Treasurer 77.66 

Chicago Lodge No. 437 10.00 

Cicero Chapter No. 180 25.00 

Cleveland Lodge No. 211 25.00 

Austin Lodge No. 850 25.00 

Golden Rule Lodge No. 726 10.00 

Columbian Lodge No. 819 10.00 

Garden City Lodge No. 141 10.00 

Thos. J. Turner Lodge No. 409 : 10.00 

Home Lodge No. 508 10.00 

Marine Lodge No. 355 5.00 

Bro. B. F. Hedges 5.00 

Bee Hive Lodge No. 909 5.00 

Mrs. Sarah A. Eddy, Treasurer . 45.00 

$344.40 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

As per receipted bills examined by Executive Committee $63.47 

Balance on hand 280.93 



$344.40 
Sales and Rebates, 
receipts. 

Sale of old barrels and iron .....$3.30 

Rebate from Arcana Lodge No. 717 on clothing for Adair 
children as follows : 

Boys' suits (3) $13.01 

Boys' shoes (2 pairs) 3.15 

Girl's coat 3.75 

19.91 

Rebate from Harbor Lodge No. 731 on clothing for 

Gutcher boys, as follows : 

Boys' suits (2) $8.40 

Boys' caps (2) 90 

Boys' undershirts (4) 1.00 

Boys' nightshirts (4) 1.40 

11.70 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



lb 



Rebate from Bro. C. W. Arndt of Constantia Lodge No. 
783 for clothing furnished the boys, as follows : 

Boys' suits (2) 9.00 

Boys' underwear • 1.00 

10.00 

Rebate from Dearborn Lodge No. 310 on badges authorized 
by the Lodge to be worn by the children at annual picnic 
held at Cedar Lake, June 26 2.25 

$47.16 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Cash to Grand Secretary Sept. 2, 1909 $47.16 



Name. 
Bablitz, Mamie . . , 
Rhodus, Kethel F. . 
Rhodus, Frances H 
Graham, John .... 
Adair, Harriet H. . 

Adair, Robert W Jan. 21, 1909 

Adair, Arthur J Jan. 21, 1909 

Swalley, Carter A... Mar. 28, 1909 

Swalley, Helen D Mar. 28, 1909 

Swalley, Ellen D Mar. 28, 1909 

Olson, Herbert A Apr. 2, 1909 

Norris, Evelyn M May 6, 1909 

Norris, Willia H May 6, 1909 

G'utcher, Wm. R. D..May 20, 1909 

Gutcher, Thomas A.. May 20, 1909 

H'jarsen, Otto A. P.. May 21, 1909 

Wayraan, Esther M..May 31, 1909 

Wayman, Josephine E.May 31, 1909 

Arndt, Carl J July 20, 1909 

Arndt, William H July 20, 1909 

Schubert, Alice Aug. 6, 1909 

Butcher, Florence E.Aug. 14, 1909 

Welborn, Charles ...Aug. 31, 1909 

Welborn, Richard J.. Aug. 31, 1909 

Cary, James L Sept. 17, 1909 

Cary, Sarah A Sept. 17, 1909 

Cary, Hubert O Sept. 17, 1909 

Cary, Thelma S Sept. 17, 1909 



Admitted Since Sept. 30, 1908. 

Age 

Admitted. Age. Now. Lodge. Location. 

...Oct. 5, 1908 8 9 Constantia, 783 Chicago 

...Oct. 3, 1908 8 9 Tolono, 391 Tolono 

...Oct. 3, 1908 6 7 Tolono, 391 Tolono 

..Dec. 26, 1908 7 8 Ashlar, 308 Chicago 

..Jan. 21, 1909 12 12 Arcana, 717 Chicago 

8 8 Arcana, 717 Chicago 

6 6 Arcana, 717 Chicago 

5 5 John D. Moody, 510...Iuka 
3 3 John D. Moody, 510...Iuka 

3 3 John D. Moody, 510...Iuka 
13 13 Covenant, 526 Chicago 

6 6 Composite, 879 ....Chicago 

4 5 Composite, 879 ....Chicago 

7 7 Harbor, 731 Chicago 

5 5 Harbor, 731 Chicago 

11 11 Chicago, 437 Chicago 

9 9 Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

5 5 Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

5 5 Constantia, 783 ....Chicago 
4 4 Constantia, 783 ....Chicago 

7 7 Union Park, 610 Chicago 

9 9 Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

11 11 New Haven, 230.. N. Haven 

9 9 New Haven, 230.. N. Haven 

13 13 Herrin's Prairie, 693.Herrin 

11 11 Herrin's Prairie, 693. Herrin 

6 6 Herrin's Prairie, 6 9 3. Herrin 
4 4 Herrin's Prairie. 693. Herrin 



Discharged Since Sept. 30, 1909. 

Shaw, Daniel P Oct. L, 1908 

Peterson, Agnes E. C Oct. 12, 1908 

Follett, Kathcrinc Nov. 18, L908 



76 



Proceedings of the 



(October 12, 



Thompson, Mildred A Dec. 26, 1908 

Thompson, Marj orie A Dec. 26, 1908 

Mackie, George June 25, 1909 

Park, Hazel June 25, 1909 

Crapp, Stephen J June 26, 1909 

Houle, Conrad M June 30, 1909 

Kemp, Edward ^ July 15, 1909 

Lane, Brice A Aug. 2, 1909 

Butcher, Florence E Sept. 1, 1909 



Present Membership of the Home is as Follows. 



Name. Admitted. 

French, Chester Apr. 25, 1900 

Foust, Hazel Aug., 26, 1900 

Kernahan, Carolyn ..May 10, 1901 

Bimerick, Elsie June 6, 1901 

Kernahan, William J.Nov. 1, 1901 
Seabrook, Florence . .Dec. 31, 1901 
Seabrook, Howard ...Dec. 21, 1901 
Brookman, Lillian M.June 11, 1902 
Brookman, Virginia A. June 11, 1902 
Lane, James A...... July 29, 1903 

Lane, Gladys B July 29, 1903 

Seabrook, Alice M...Sept. 3, 1903 

Shaw, Robert E Sept. 15, 1903 

Brookman, John F...Dec. 17, 1903 
Ledger, Marian C....Feb. 20, 1905 

Crapp, Laura M May 30, 1905 

Crapp, Robert May 30, 1905 

Black, Agnes M Sept. 1, 1906 

Hoseney, Ora May.. .Aug. 24, 1907 
Hoseney, Bernice ...Aug. 24, 1907 
Van Asdlen, Bessie B.Jan. 31, 1908 
Van Asdlen, Wm. M..Jan. 31, 1908 

Caskie, Mary F Mar. 18, 1908 

Caskie, James F Mar. 18, 1908 

Hoffer, Arthur L Mar. 18, 1908 

Messner, Christian A.. May 7, 1908 
Messner, Joseph F....May 7, 1908 
Hopkins, Mabel C.Aug. 30, 1908 

Hopkins, Helen Aug. 30, 1908 

Bablitz, -Mamie Oct. 5, 1908 

Rhodus, Kethel F Oct. 3, 1908 

Rhodus, Frances Helen. Oct. 3, 1908 

Graham, John Dec. 26, 1908 

Adair, Harriet H Jan. 21, 1909 

Adair, Robert W Jan. 21, 1909 

Adair, Arthur J Jan. 21, 1909 

Swalley, Carter A... Mar. 28, 1909 



Age. 
4 
4 
5 
8 
3 
4 
3 
5 
3 
7 
3 
3 
5 
3 



Age 

Now. Lodge. Location. 

13 Blair, 393 Chicago 

13 Yorktown, 655 . . . .Tampico 

13 Ashlar, 308 Chicago 

16 Cedar, 124 Morris 

11 Ashlar, 308 Chicago 

12 Berwyn, 839 Berwyn 

Berwyn, 839 Berwyn 

Garfield, 686 Chicago 

Garfield, 686 Chicago 

Ellis, 633 Rockford 

Ellis, 633 Rockford 

9 Berwyn, 839 Berwyn 

11 Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

8 Garfield, 686 Chicago 

13 Covenant, 526 Chicago 

12 Mystic Star, 758 .. .Chicago 

9 Mystic Star, 758 ... Chicago 

11 Richard Cole, 697.. Chicago 

12 Hutton, 698 Diona 

6 Hutton, 698 Diona 

8 Channahon, 262 Channahon 
6 Channahon, 262 Channahon 

14 Englewood, 690 



12 Englewood, 690 



. . .Chicago 
. . .Chicago 
Monticello 
. . .Chicago 
. . .Chicago 



Fraternal, 58 
Accordia, 277 
Accordia, 277 

Myrtle, 795 Chicago 

Myrtle, 795 Chicago 

Constantia, 783 ...Chicago 

Tolono, 391 Tolono 

Tolono, 391 Tolono 

Ashlar, 308 Chicago 

Arcana, 717 ......Chicago 

Arcana, 717 Chicago 

Arcana, 717 Chicago 

John D. Moody, 510...Iuka 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



77 



Name Admitted. Age. 

Swalley, Helen D Mar. 28, 1909 3 

Swalle}', Ellen D Mar. 28, 1909 3 

Olson, Herbert Apr. 2, 1909 13 

Norris, Evelyn M May 6, 1909 6 

Norris, "William H May 6, 1909 4 

Gutcher, Wm. R. D..May 20, 1909 7 

Gutcher, Thomas A.. May 20, 1909 5 

H'jarsen, Otto A. P.. May 21, 1909 11 

Wayman, Estner M..May 31, 1909 9 

Wayraen, Josephine E.May 31, 1909 5 

Arndt, Carl J July 20, 1909 5 

Arndt, William H July 20, 1909 4 

Schubert, Alice Aug. 6, 1909 7 

Welborn, Charles Aug. 31,1909 11 

Welborn, Richard J.. Aug. 31, 1909 9 

Cary, James L Sept. 17, 1909 13 

Cary, Sarah A Sept. 17, 1909 11 

Cary, Hubert O Sept. 17, 1909 6 

Cary, Thelma S Sept. 17, 1909 4 



Age 

Now. Lodge. Location. 

3 John D. Moody, 510...Iuka 

3 John D. Moody, 510...Iuka 
13 Covenant, 526 Chicago 

6 Composite, 879 ....Chicago 
5 Composite, 879 Chicago 

7 Harbor, 731 Chicago 

5 Harbor, 731 Chicago 

11 Chicago, 437 Chicago 

9 Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

5 Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

5 Constantia, 783 ....Chicago 

4 Constantia, 783 ...Chicago 
7 Union Park, 610 .. .Chicago 

11 New Haven, 230. N. Haven 

9 New Haven, 230. N. Haven 

13 Herrin's Prairie, 693.Herrin 

11 Herrin's Prairie, 693 Herrin 

6 Herrin's Prairie, 693 Herrin 
4 Herrin's Prairie, 693 Herrin 



Recapitulation of Population. 

Members in the Home October 1, 1908 

Admitted during the year 



40 
28 



Discharged during the year 



68 
12 



Members in the Home September 30, 1909. 
Gain during the year 



Cause of Discharges. 

Expiration of time 7 

Mothers married again 3 

Taken out by mothers able to provide 2 



12 
Among those outside of Chicago who have visited the Home were 

Grand Master Bell, President Scott, and Trustees Steele and Berks. 
It was understood that the children would be taken to Sullivan for 

an outing of a few days during the summer, but when the time 

seemed best to go more than half of them were away on vacation, and 

there was chicken pox in the Home. 

Mrs. Bassett joins me in expressing appreciation for courteous treat 

merit accorded us and for the confidence reposed in us by the Trustees 

during the year. Fraternally, 

Chas. E. Bassett, Superintendent. 



78 Proceedings of the (October 12, 



REPORT— Of Superintendent Illinois Masonic Home. 

Sullivan, Ills., Sept. 15th, 1909. 
To the President and Members of the Board of Trustees Illinois Ma- 
sonic Home: 

Dear Brothers: Herewith report for year ending Sept. 15th, 1909, 
On return from Grand Lodge, we commenced to lay in our supplies 
and put all things in order for the coming of Winter. 

Through the generosity of our brothers we had a most delightful 
Christmas time. A large Christmas tree, all decorated in holiday at- 
tire, was placed in the center of our reading room, chairs were placed 
around the tree for the old boys and girls ; at the appointed time Santa 
Claus came on the scene with presents for everybody. After these had 
been distributed, Superintendent suggested that each one shake hands 
with his neighbor and wish them a Merry Christmas. This was done, 
and a happier, jollier set of people is rarely seen. While this was go- 
ing on and almost before we knew what was being done, a large circle 
was formed around the tree and old and young joined in the dance. 
Wish all the Brothers in Illinois could have looked in on us at that 
time. It certainly was fine. 

Following is a list of those who made our glad Christmas time pos- 
sible : 

Delavan Lodge No. 156 $ 5.00 

Waubansia Lodge No. 160 10.00 

Cerro Gordo Lodge No. 600 5.00 

N. D. Morse Lodge No. 546 5.00 

Western Star Lodge No. 240 5.00 

Urbana Lodge No. 157 5.00 

Rantoul Lodge No. 470 5.00 

Sidney Lodge No. 347 5.00 

Sangamon Lodge No. 801 l.OO 

Pera Lodge No. 574 5.00 

Atwood Lodge No. 561 5.00 

Ogden Lodge No. 754 5.00 

J. R. Gorin Lodge No. 537 5.00 

Mahomet Lodge No: 220 5.00 

Tolono Lodge No. 391 5.00 

Broadland Lodge No. 791 5.00 

Ed. Gaylord, Canton, Ills 10.00 

Austin Lodge No. 850 25.00 

W. H. Mayer, N. Y. City 5.00 

E. St. Louis Lodge No. 504 25.00 

Cornland Lodge No. 888 2.00 






1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 79 

Lexington Lodge No. 482 10.00 

Mansfield Lodge No. 773 5.00 

Villa Grove Lodge No. 885 5.00 

Homer Lodge No. 199 5.00 

Wright's Grove Lodge No. 779 5.00 

Columbia Lodge No. 819 10.00 

Gothic Lodge No. 852 10.00 

Oriental Lodge No. 33 25.00 

Wheaton Lodge No. 269 10.00 

Rutland Lodge No. 477 5.00 

From this fund we were also enabled to give the old boys and 
girls a nice display of fireworks on July 4th. So you see my Brothers 
your generosity shed a lot of sunshine in the lives of the members 
of our Home family. 

We are -indebted to the Sullivan band for a fine concert given us 
by that organization on October 19th. 

To Major C. F. Emery for the following books for the Home 
Library : 

Hidden Treasures, thirteen bound volumes Harper's Magazine, 
nine bound volumes Godey's Magazine, American Miscellany, Midsum- 
mer Night's Dream, Live Coals, Ladies of the White House, The 
Farmers' Book, The Handwriting of God, The Progressive Ages ; 
Princes, Authors and Statesmen, Pilgrims' Progress, Pleasant Hours 
With Illustrious Men and Women, Politics and Politicians of Illinois, 
The Rhine, The National Encyclopedia, Arctic Explorations, Itinerent 
Life, Glimpses of Fifty Years, Woman on the Frontier, What Can A 
Woman Do, Between the Gates, Life and Labors of Livingston, One 
Hundred Years of American Independence, Home of God's People. 
Twenty Years of Congress, The Home, National History, Not on the 
Chart, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Longfellow's Poems. 

Brother S. R. Stoddard, one volume Masonic History by Mitchell. 
Temple Lodge, forty-six years' subscription to Peoria Journal and 
Peoria Star. 

Charles Catlin, Secretary Oriental Lodge No. 33, Lodge Notes. 
Miss Minnie Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Marxmiller, Genevieve Lowe 
and Ed. Wright for music for our church service on April 25th. 

On Saturday, June 13th Rev. Elmer Kelso Towle, evangelist, came 
out and gave us a fine sermon. Wayne Calhoun, Miss Richardson. Mrs. 
Sabin and Minnie Wright furnished the music for the occasion and 
Brother E. J. Enslow brought the party out in his automobile. 

To some unknown Brother we are indebted for fourteen volumes 
of The Real America in Romance. 



80 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Brother James A. Steele sends us the following magazines : 
Scribner's, Red Book, Harper's Bazaar, Cosmopolitan, Ladies' Home 
Journal and McClure's. 

Julien C. Crutwell, Review of Reviews. Macon Lodge No. 8, De- 
catur Review. 

We receive the following papers through the courtesy of the pub- 
lishers : The Decatur Daily Herald, Bloomington Daily Bulletin, 
Bloomington Weekly Pantagraph, Reynolds Press, Galesburg Evening 
News, Mattoon Journal, Orange Judd Farmer, Sullivan Progress, Sul- 
livan Saturday Herald, Sullivan Democrat, the Moultrie County News, 
Windsor Gazette, Bement Register, Masonic News, Masonic Chronicler, 
Illinois Freemason and Eastern Star Journal. 

Miss Amy Hovey and Will W. Eden furnished music for the 
funeral service of Bro. L. B. Harrington. 

Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Dixon, E. J. Miller and W. W. Eden furnished 
music for the funeral of Bro. E. L. Cunningham. 

The pastors of the Sullivan churches — Rev. F. T. Klotzsche of the 
Baptist church, Rev. T. J. Wheat of Methodist church, Rev. A. T. 
Corey of Presbyterian church and Rev. J. W. Walters of Christian 
church — have taken turn about in conducting our church services at 
the Home during the year. They have been faithful in season and out 
of season and we fully appreciate their work. 

Our Sister Nancy Campbell died Sept. 18th, her remains were sent 
to Edinburg, 111., and there buried under the direction of Mound Lodge 
No. 122 of Taylorville. 

On December 15th, Bro. Henry Schure became mentally unbalanced 
and he was removed from the Home by Harbor Lodge No. 731 of 
Chicago. 

On November 27th Sister Harriet G. Crosier committed suicide. 
Her remains were taken to Browns, 111., and there buried. 

March 22nd Arthur Dugas of DeKalb Lodge No. 144 lost his mind 
and was taken in charge of by his lodge. 

Bro. John Hall Gassaway died March 8th and was laid to rest in 
Sullivan cemetery with Masonic honors. 

Bro. John H. Hough died May 28th, buried in our Home Burying 
Grounds in Sullivan with Masonic honors. 

Sister Mary Stone died June 21st, remains sent to Ullin, 111. for 
burial. 

Bro. H. A. Fager died July 21st, his remains sent to Havana, 111. 
for burial by direction of Havana Lodge No. 88, of which he was a 
member. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



81 



Bro. Lewis B. Harrington died July 19th. His remains sent to 
Chicago and there buried with Masonic honors by William B. Warren 
Lodge No. 209. 

Bro. Nicholas Zimmer died in Chicago July 2nd. He was given 
Masonic burial by Garden City Lodge No. 141, of which he was a 
member. 

Bro. E. L. Cunningham died September 6th. His remains were 
.buried in our Home grounds in Sullivan cemetery. Through the 
courtesy of Sullivan Lodge No. 764, all the Brothers buried in Sul- 
livan cemetery are buried with Masonic honors. 

Members of our Home Family are as Follows. 



Name and Age. Date Admitted. 

Mrs. A. W. Philhower, 69.. Dec. 23, 1904. 

Alexander Masters, 76 Dec. 7, 1904. 

Mary J. Masters, 71 Dec. 7, 1904. 

L. N. Roland, 84 Dec. 7, 1904. 

John W. Apperson, 87 Dec. 15, 1904. 

G. W. Dickinson, 79 Dec. 20, 1904. 

Henry F. Birely, 80 Dec. 27, 1904. 

Chas. H. Hubbell, 78 Dec. 27, 1904. 

Hiram H. Carpenter, 87 Dec. 29, 1904. 

Geo. Kenney, 80 Jan. 12, 1905. 

Thos. W. Cunningham, 59.. Feb. 15, 1905. 

George Cushing, 91.... March S, 1905. 

G. N. Van-Houten, 80 May 1, 1905. 

John S. Kistler, 63 May 12, 1905 

G. D. Rundell, 78 June 28, 1905. 

A. J. Lundquist, 80 Oct. 3, 1905. 

W. C. McDugle, 80 Oct. 16, 1905. 

John M. Kerr, 85 Nov. 23, 1905. 

Levi Sisk, 81 Nov. 23, 1905. 

Phillippa Nelson, 71 Nov. 28, 1905. 

Stephen Ellis, 84 Feb. 15, 1906. 

George McKissick, 57 Feb. 22, 1906. 

Mary A. Alexander, 75.... March 31, 1906. 

Zachariah Shugart, 77 May 14, 1906. 

J. W. Hoover, 61 June 29, 1906. 

Chas. H. George, 64 Nov. 2, 1906. 

Hester Mepham, 87 Nov. 12, 1906. 

Orilla McAllister, 72 June 29, 1907. 

George W. Cox, 67 June 7, 1907. 

George W. Hamer, 79 Sept. 5, 1907. 

J. W. Walker, 77 Oct. 19, 1907. 

Gabriel Clark, 78 Dec. 4, 1907. 

Oswin Bourne, 72 Jan. 29, 1908. 

Allen Newnham 74 Feb. 1, 190S. 

Mrs. M. V. Cox, 63 Feb. 10, 190S. 

John G. Crosier, 66 Feb. IS, 190S. 



Lodge. Location. 

..Mattoon, 260 Mattoon 

..Central, 71 Springfield 

..Central, 71 Springfield 

. .Virden, 161 Virden 

..Bloomfield, 148 ...Chrisman 
..Jackson, 53 . . . . Shelbyville 
..Robert Burns, 113 .Keitsburg 

..Lancaster, 106 Glasford 

..Oriental, 33 Chicago 

..Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

..Mahomet, 220 Mahomet 

..Bradford, 514 Bradford 

..Landmark, 422 Chicago 

. .Pre-empiion, 755 ...Pre-emption 

..Acacia, 67 LaSalle 

. .G'reenview, 63 ...Greenview 

..Clinton, 19 Petersburg 

..Pleiades, 478 ....... Chicago 

..Prairie, 2 7 Paris 

..Pleiades, 47S Chicago 

..Harmony, 3 ....Jacksonville 
..Rock Island, 658.. R. Island 

. .Ionic, 312 Decatur 

..Colchester, 496 ..Colchester 

..Greenup, 125 Greenup 

..Hesperia, 411 Chicago 

..Empire, 126 P. -kin 

..Genoa, 288 Genoa 

..Clayton, 147 Clayton 

..Tyrian, 333 Springfield 

..New Hope, 620. . .Livingston 

..Flora, 204 Flora 

. .Streator, 607 Streator 

..Barry, 34 Barn 

..Clayton, 147 ClaytoP 

. .Ml. Vernon, 81 . .Mt. Vernon 



82 



Proceedings of the 



(October 12, 



Name and Age. Date Admitted. 

Sarah Cain, 76 Feb. 18, 1908. 

Mrs. G. W. Hamer, 76 April 15, 1908, 

W. H. Maroe, 50 April 20, 1908. 

Louis Klein, 34 April 28, 1908. 

Thomas Gonio, 70 May 6, 1908. 

Arthur M. Kelley, 59 May 11, 1908, 

John Gregor, 81 May 11, 1908, 

A. W. Pohlman, 55 May 11, 1908, 

Harrison Orr, 71 May 12, 1908, 

T. B. Sprouse, 64 May 14, 1908, 

R. J. Dauphiney, 67 May 18, 1908, 

John D. Easter, 82 May 18, 1908, 

Fred Yunker, 68 May 22, 1908, 

W. H. Snell, 62 May 26, 1908. 

James P. Craig, 75 May 27, 1908. 

John T. Fitzpatrick, 74 June 21, 1908. 

O. O. Wormwood, 77 June 22, 1908. 

Wm. Leeped, 60 Aug. 24, 1908. 

Ernest Adam, 78 Sept. 3, 1908. 

Aaron Hall, 72 Sept. 9, 1908 . 

Nels. Anderson, 79 Sept. 12, 1908. 

Ellen Bruner, 70 Oct. 3, 1908. 

James W. Smith Nov. 6, 1908 . 

L. B. Phettyplace, 66 D'ec. 2, 1908. 

Maria Carter, 82 Dec. 10, 1908 . 

S. R. Stoddard, 73 Jan. 4, 1909. 

J. H. Champlin, 61 .April 19, 1909. 

Nellie G. Champlin, 47 April 19, 1909. 

Mary B. Dauphiney, 53 ....May 7, 1909. 

B. Fancher, 80 May 8, 1909. 

E. N. Baker, 71 May 18, 1909. 

Mrs. E. Baker, 58 May 18, 1909. 

Rob't Huffmaster, 67 May 27, 1909. 

Mrs. A. Robbins, 71 June 4, 1909. 

G. H. Reynolds, 85 June 22, 1909. 

G. A. Titus, 62 June 25, 1909. 

W. A. Young, 80 July 22, 1909. 

Mrs. M. A. Walder, 70 July 30, 1909. 

Chas. Maroe, 12 July 30, 1909. 

L. Kalor, 61 Aug. 30, 1909 . 



Lodge. Location. 

..Blue Mound, 682. Blue Mound 

..Tyrian, 333 Springfield 

..Kindrick, 430 Timewell 

..Keystone, 629 Chicago 

..Covenant, 526 Chicago 

..Atlanta, 165 Atlanta 

..Nebo, 806 Nebo 

..Temple, 46 Peoria 

..Toledo, 834 Toledo 

..Carmi, 272 Carmi 

..Garfield, 686 Chicago 

..Evans, 524 Evanston 

. .Wilmington, 208 .Wilm'g't'n 
..Benjamin, 297 ..Camp Point 

..Illinois, 262 Peoria 

..Arcana, 717 Chicago 

..Jerusalem Temple, 90 Aurora 

..Oriental, 33 Chicago 

..Herman, 39 Quincy 

..Ionic, 312 Decatur 

..Lakeside, 739 Chicago 

..Peasa, 27 Alton 

..Jackson, 487 Corinth 

..D. C. Cregier, 643 .. .Chicago 

..Landmark, 422 Chicago 

..Effingham, 49 ....Effingham 

..Capron, 575 Capron 

..Capron, 575 Capron 

..Garfield, 686 Chicago 

..Dearborn, 310 Chicago 

..Wade Barney, 512..Bl'mgt'n 
..Wade Barney, 512 . .Bl'mgt'n 

..Laomi, 450 Lamoi 

. .Waubansia, 160 ....Chicago 

..Kilwinning, 311 Chicago 

..Illinois, 263 Peoria 

..Hope, 162 Sparta 

..Cairo, 237 Cairo 

..Kindrick, 430 Timewell 

..Pleidaes, 478 Chicago 



RECAPITULATION. 



Membership Sept. 15, 1908 
Number received 



.68 Died 9 

.22 Discharged 5 

Membership Sept. 15 76 

90 90 



We are satisfied that all is well here at this Home, that the Home 
atmosphere is apparent to all and that contentment and happiness reign 
within its walls. Mrs. Hovey and myself desire to express our grati- 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 83 

tude for the kindly words of advice, the many acts of kindness, and 
the courteous treatment given us by the members of the Board. 

Your fraternally, 

Chas. L. Hovey, Superintendent. 

So much of the report as related to the appropriations was 
referred to the Finance Committee. The balance of the re- 
port was adopted. 

EEPOKT— Committee on Chartered Lodges. 
M.W. Bro. Charles F. Hitchcock. Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Chartered Lodges, presented the report of that 
Committee. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge A. F. and A. M.: 

Your Committee on Chartered Lodges having carefully examined 
the returns of the Constituent Lodges for the year ending June 30, 1909, 
submit the following summary of the tabulated statement : 

Increase. 

Number raised 7,107 

Number reinstated 359 

Number admitted 1,051 

Number added for error 74 

Total increase 8,591 

Decrease. 

Number suspended S60 

Number expelled 22 

Number dimitted 1,678 

Number died 1,199 

Number deducted for error 48 

Total decrease 3,807 

Net gain in membership 4.7S4 

Total membership, June 30, 1909 95,629 

Number of Chartered Lodges 770 

Members residing in Illinois 85,802 

Non-resident members 9,829 

Number initiated 7,639 

Number passed 7,225 



84 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Received from dues, year ending June 30, 1909. $86,024.70 
Contributed to members, their widows and or- 
phans $38,610.83 

Contributed to those not members 4,270.54 

Contributed to Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home 439.15 



Total contributed by Lodges to Charity. . .$43,320.52 
All of which is fraternally submitted, 

C. F. Hitchcock, 
Jas. L. Scott, 
C. M. Turner, 

S. M. SCHOEMANN, 

W. A. Dixon, 

Committee. 

On motion it was adopted. 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS-Proposed. 
The following- amendments to Grand Lodge By-Laws 
were offered. More than twenty Representatives of lodges 
seconded each amendment, and they lie over for action until 
next year : 

By Bro. Samuel M. Fitch of Damascus Lodge : 

Amend Section 2, Article 5, Part 1, Grand Lodge By-Laws so as to 
read as follows : 

Section 2. The Grand Treasurer shall execute and file with the 
Grand Master, before his installation, an official bond, in such- penal sum 
as may be prescribed by the Grand Lodge, with personal security to be 
approved by the Grand Master, conditioned that he will faithfully dis- 
charge the duties of his office as prescribed in these by-laws, and at the 
end of his term, or sooner, if lawfully required so to do, pay over and 
transfer to his successor in office all funds, securities, books, records, 
vouchers, or property belonging to the Grand Lodge, which shall have 
come into his keeping. 

By Bro. Lewis E. Hamburg of Bee Hive Lodge No. 909: 

Amend Section 1, Article 13, Part 2, Grand Lodge By-laws, so as to 
read as follows : 

Section 1. All petitions for the degrees or for membership shall 
be made in writing and signed by the applicant, with his full name and 
shall state the date and place of his birth ; his occupation specifically ; the 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 85 

name of his employer, if he have any; and if the occupation shall be 
stated as clerk, salesman, manager, solicitor, adjuster, or any other in- 
definite term, it shall then state the particular kind of business or em- 
ployment in which he is such clerk, salesman, manager, solicitor, ad- 
juster, etc. It shall state his place of residence, and, where the peti- 
tioner resides in a city having streets that are named and houses that 
are numbered, he shall state in his petition the name of his street and 
the number of his house. And in case of a petitioner for the degrees, 
whether he had previously made application to be made a Mason to any 
lodge, and shall be accompanied by the fee which the by-laws of the 
lodge require with the petition. In cases where the petitioner has be- 
fore petitioned to be made a Mason, he shall state the name, number, 
location and jurisdiction of the lodge previously petitioned, and the date 
as near as may be of such former petition. Every petition shall be 
recommended in writing by three members of the lodge and be read at a 
stated meeting and entered in substance upon the records. After it has 
been read it shall be received by the voice of the lodge either tacitly or 
formally given ; or at its pleasure, the lodge may refuse to receive it. 

By Bro. George E. Haley of Garfield Lodge Xo. 686 : 

Amend Section 2, Article 11, Part 2, Grand Lodge By-laws, so as to 
read as follows : 

Section 2. The personal jurisdiction of a lodge shall extend over 
all its members (except its Master, or the Grand Master if a member 
thereof) wherever they may reside; and over its unfinished work and 
rejected material, wherever they may be dispersed. Provided, however, 
that when a petition to be made a Mason has been rejected by any lodge 
in this state and such rejected petitioner afterwards removes to another 
state and petitions a lodge in such other state to be made a Mason, the 
lodge rejecting his petition in this state or this Grand Lodge shall have 
no claim to jurisdiction over such rejected material from and after five 
years from the date of such rejection. 

By Bro. Otto F. Harms of Lincoln Park Lodge No. 6ll : 

Amend Section 3, Article 6, Part 1, Grand Lodge By-laws so as to 
read as follows : 

Section 3. He shall execute and file with the Grand Master, before 
his installation, an official bond in such penal sum as may be prescribed 
by the Grand Lodge, with such personal security as shall bo approved by 
the Grand Master, conditioned that he will faithfully discharge the 
duties of his office as prescribed by these by-laws. 



86 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

By M.W. Bro. George M. Moulton : 

Amend Section 4, Article 3, Part 1 of the By-laws, (a) by striking 
out the word "Fifteen and inserting the words "Twenty-five," also (b) by 
inserting the word "Financial" between the words "full" and "compensa- 
tion," also (c) by inserting the words "Stenographer and" between the 
words "Including" and "Clerk," so that the section when amended will 
read as follows : 

Section 4. The salary of the Grand Master shall be twenty-five 
hundred dollars per annum, payable in monthly installments, which sum 
shall be in full financial compensation for the performance of the duties 
of his office, including stenographer and clerk hire; provided, that for 
such sums as he may expend for postage and stationery and incidental 
expenses, the Grand Lodge may make appropriations upon presentation 
of itemized bills approved by the Committee on Finance. 

By Bro. W. H. Coleman, Jr., of Temple Lodge No. 46: 

Amend Section 1, Article 17, Part 2 of Grand Lodge By-laws. By 
striking out the words, "The city of Chicago," in the fourth line of said 
section, and inserting in lieu thereof the words, "Cities containing a 
population of 50,000 or more inhabitants." By making the section read 
when amended, as follows : 

Section 1. No lodge under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge 
shall be permitted to confer the three degrees upon any person for a 
less sum than twenty-five dollars : Provided, that in cities containing a 
population of fifty thousand or more inhabitants the minimum fee for 
the three degrees shall be fifty dollars ; and the apportionment of such 
sum to the degrees, respectively, shall be regulated by the by-laws of 
each lodge. 

M.W. Bro. William H. Scott, Senior Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Illinois, now residing in California, was in- 
vited to the East, and spoke very entertainingly. 

M.W. Bro. Edward Cook offered a motion that the Grand 
Secretary be instructed to send a telegram to M.W. Bro. John 
M. Pearson, expressive of our greetings, our best wishes, our 
sorrow at his absence, and our sympathy in his affliction. 

The motion was carried. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 87 

R.W. Bro. Roswell T. Spencer offered a motion that a half 
tone cut of Loyal L. Munn be inserted in the Proceedings this 
year. 

This was referred to the Committee on Finance. 

EEPOKT-Oommittee on Petitions. 
W. Brother Hagle, Chairman of the Committee on Pe- 
titions, presented the report of his Committee. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Illinois, A. F. and A. M. 

Your Committee on Petitions beg leave to make the following re- 
port: 

1. The petition of Hiram W. Beers shows that on October 17, 1896, 
he was expelled by Andrew Jackson Lodge No. 487 for unmasonic con- 
duct. From an examination of the papers in this matter and the certifi- 
cate of the Secretary of Andrew Jackson Lodge, we find that said lodge 
by a unanimous vote, has recommended reinstatement to good standing 
in the fraternity, the said petitioner. We therefore concur in said recom- 
mendation and ask that the prayer of said petition be granted and said 
petitioner be restored to good standing in the fraternity. 

2. The petition of John A. Shirley shows that on or about the 
month of August, 1873, was expelled by New Columbia Lodge No. 336 
for unmasonic conduct. After having carefully examined the papers in 
said case, we find that New Columbia Lodge by unanimous vote have 
recommended that said petitioner be restored to good standing in the 
fraternity. We, your committee, recommend that the prayer of said 
petition be granted. 

3. The petition of Ernest Hobson shows that on or about the 17th 
day of August, 1906, he was expelled by Siloam Lodge No. 780 for con- 
duct unbecoming a Mason. From the certificate of the Secretary of 
Siloam Lodge, attached to the petition herein, that said lodge by an al- 
most unanimous vote, has recommended that said Ernest Hobson be re- 
stored to good standing in the fraternity. We, therefore, concur in said 
recommendation and ask that the prayer of said petition be granted. 

4. The petition of William W. Burgess shows that on or about 
the 9th day of March, 1905, he was expelled by Lake Creek Lodge No. 
729 for unmasonic conduct. Wc find from an examination of the papers 
that Lake Creek Lodge has by a unanimous vote, recommended that the 
Grand Lodge restore said petitioner to good standing in the fraternity. 



88 Proceedings of the (October 12, 

Your committee recommend that the prayer of said petition be granted 
and that said petitioner be restored to good standing in the fraternity. 

5. The petition of F. H. Sears shows that on or about the 29th day 
of May, 1899, he was suspended by Hiram Lodge No. 26 for non-pay- 
ment of dues. And that said Hiram Lodge No. 26 has since become and 
now is defunct. And from a receipt from the Grand Secretary, we find 
that said petitioner has paid into the Grand Lodge all dues charged 
;against petitioner by said defunct lodge and that he now prays that the 
Grand Lodge restore him to good standing in the fraternity. We there- 
fore recommend that said petitioner be restored to good standing in the 
iraternity. 

6. The petition of George Edward Fosberg shows that on or about 
the 25th day of March, 1902, he was expelled by Ashlar Lodge No. 308 
for conduct unbecoming a Mason. From an examination of the papers 
and from the facts and circumstances surrounding the case, and the 
certificate of the Secretary of said Ashlar Lodge, we find that said lodge 
has recommended the restoration of said petitioner to good standing in 
the fraternity. We therefore ask that the prayer of said petition be 
granted and that he be so restored. 

7. The petition of Andrew Hynes Story shows that on or about 
the 13th day of March, 1907, he was expelled by May Lodge No. 718, 
for conduct unbecoming a Mason. After having carefully examined the 
papers filed herein and the certificate of the Secretary of May Lodge 
No. 718, we find that therefrom that the lodge has failed by a majority 
vote of the members present to recommend the granting of the prayer 
of said petition. We would respectfully recommend that the papers 
herein be referred back to said Lodge for further action thereon. 

8. The petition of George W. Pulford shows that on or about the 
19th day of October, 1907, he was expelled from Damascus Lodge No. 
888 for unmasonic conduct. Your committee have carefully examined 
all the papers and the evidence in this case and from a careful con- 
sideration thereof, and being fully advised in the premises, we are of 
the opinion that the good of Masonry would be best conserved by not 
granting the prayer of said petitioner. We would recommend that the 
prayer of the petition be not granted at this time. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

Ben Hagle, 
J. E. Wheat, 
Francis E. Baldwin, 
Committee. 
The report was adopted. 



1909-) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 89 

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS-Adopted. 
R.W. Sidney S. Breese called up the amendments to 
Article 15, Part I, Grand Lodge By-Laws proposed last year, 
and moved its adoption. 

The section as adopted reads as follows : 

Section 6. The members of this Board shall be considered as a 
standing committee and be entitled to mileage and per diem for at- 
tendance at Grand Lodge the same as other standing committees re- 
frred to in Section 6, Article 13, Part 1, of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. 

The amendment was adopted. 

KESOLUTION-Past Grand Master's Jewel. 
Bro. J. Scott Matthews, Worshipful Master of Equity 
Lodge No. 8/8, presented the following resolution. 

Resolved, That each' and every Past Grand Master be presented by 
this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge with a Past Grand Master's jewel, 
each jewel to cost not less than one hundred and fifty dollars. 

It was referred to the Finance Committee. 

AMENDMENT TO BY-LAWS-Adopted. 
Bro. Julius Kline of Ashlar Lodge No. 308, called up the 
amendment to Section 1, Article 2, Part 2, Grand Lodge By- 
Laws, proposed last year, and moved its adoption. 

The section as amended now reads as follows : 

"In a city or town where there is more than one lodge it shall 
be the duty of the Secretary of each lodge to give notice in writing to all 
other lodges situated in such city or town of all petitions received or 
rejected, stating the name in full, age, occupation and place of residence 
of the petitioner. This notice to be given promptly after receipt of a 
petition and at least twenty days before ballot thereon is taken. Pro- 
vided, that when more than one lodge shall hold its meetings in the 
same hall or room, a register may be kept upon the secretary, desk or 
other appropriate place in lieu of said written notice, setting forth the 
aforesaid particulars for the information of the lodges meeting in such 
hall; and provided, further, that said requirements as to notice shall 
not apply to petition for membership by affiliation." 

The amendment was adopted. 



90 Proceedings of the (October 12. 

AMENDMENT TO BY-LAWS-Lost. 
M.W. Bro. Edward Cook called up amendment to Section 
2, Article 8, Part 1, Grand Lodge By-Laws, proposed last 
year, and moved its adoption. 

"Section 2. Each District Deputy Grand Master shall visit every 
lodge in his district at least once in each year and thoroughly examine 
its records and accounts and fully inform himself as to the condition of 
the lodge and make report to the Grand Master in each case. He shall 
inquire into the administration of the lodge affairs and make such sug- 
gestions to the officers as seem necessary to insure a full compliance 
with Grand Lodge laws. The lodge visited shall pay the necessary 
traveling expenses for such visit upon presentation of an itemized bill. 
The District Deputy Grand Masters shall perform such other duties as 
may from time to time be assigned to them by the Grand Master. For 
the necessary expenses accruing from the performance of such specially 
delegated duties an itemized bill shall be rendered to the Grand Master, 
who in his discretion may pay the same from the Grand Lodge funds or 
order its payment by the lodge." 

The amendment was lost. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 0E ELECTION. 
The Tellers having collected and counted the several bal- 
lots reported that the following named brothers had received 
the majority of votes cast, and they were declared duly 
elected : 

Albert B. Ashley, M.W. Grand Master. 
Delmar D. Darrah, R.W. Deputy Grand Master. 
Henry T. Burnap, R.W. Senior Grand Warden. 
Ralph H. Wheeler, R.W. Junior Grand Warden. 
Leroy A. Goddard, R.W. Grand Treasurer. 
Isaac Cutter, RW. Grand Secretary. 

INVITATIONS. 
Invitations were extended to the Representatives to visit 
the following lodges: Garden City No. 14.1, St. Cecilia No. 
865, Cleveland No. 211. 

CALLED OEF. 
At 4:15 the M.W. Grand Lodge was called from labor to 
refreshment until 9 :oo o'clock Wednesday morning. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 91 



SECOND DAY. 

Wednesday, October 13, A. D. 1909, A. L. 5909. / 
9 o'clock A. M. ( 

The M.W. Grand Master called the M.W. Grand Lodge 
from refreshment to labor at 9 :oo o'clock. 

Grand Officers and Representatives were present same as 
preceding day. 

Prayer was offered by the Grand Chaplain. 

EEPOET— Special Committee. 
The Special Committee, to whom was referred the matter 
of a revision of the law pertaining to the formation of new 
lodges, submitted the following amendments to the Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws, and recommended that they take the usual 
course. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons of the State of Illinois: 

Amend Section 11, Article 13, Constitution, by adding thereto the 
following paragraph : 

Provided, however, that the Grand Lodge may, on the recom- 
mendation of the Grand Master, issue a dispensation for the formation 
of a new lodge, outside a city or town having three or more lodges, on 
the recommendation of two out of the three nearest lodges, so that 
said Section, when amended, shall read as follows : 

Section 2. No dispensation shall be issued by order of the Grand 
Lodge or by the Grand Master in any city or town having three or 
more chartered lodges (except the city of Chicago) without the recom- 
mendation of the three oldest lodges, nor in any other place, without 
the recommendation of the three nearest lodges; provided, however, that 
the Grand Lodge may, on the recommendation of the Grand Master, 
issue a dispensation for the formation of a new lodge outside a city or 
town having three or more lodges, on the recommendation of two out 
of the three nearest lodges. 



92 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Amend Section V, Article 13, Constitution, by striking out the 
word "eight'' in the second line,' and substituting therefor the word 
"twenty," so that said Section, when amended, shall read as follows : 

Section 5. Every petition for a new lodge shall be signed by 
twenty Master Masons, accompanied by a certificate from a Grand 
Lecturer that the proposed Master is able to open and close a lodge 
and to confer the degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and 
Master Mason correctly and in full, with a plat and description of the 
halls and ante-rooms to be occupied, and statement in regard to the 
ownership and use of the same. 

Amend Grand Lodge By-Laws by striking out Section 7, Article 
23, Part 2, and inserting the following in place thereof : 

Section 7. In the formation of new lodges the recommendating 
lodges must be chartered lodges. Every recommendation for the forma- 
tion of a new lodge emanating from a chartered lodge, shall certify 
that by means of a thorough examination by a competent committee 
the lodge has ascertained that the applicants are worthy Master Masons 
in good standing and that it has verified all the statements contained in 
the petition under consideration, and that said petition was read to the 
lodge in full at the meeting when received and again at the meeting 
when vote was taken, and no recommendation shall be granted by any 
lodge without the affirmative ballot of two-thirds of the members 
present at a stated communication. All resident members shall be noti- 
fied by mail of the pending application, and the date when vote thereon 
will be taken. Such recommendation shall set forth the date of the 
meetings of the lodge at which the request was received and acted 
upon, the number of votes cast for and against the same and the num- 
ber of members belonging to the lodge recommending. In a city where 
concurrent jurisdiction exists, any three lodges out of the six lodges 
nearest the proposed location of the new lodge may, recommend the 
formation of a new lodge in such city. In all places outside of such con- 
current jurisdiction, it must be the three nearest lodges whether with- 
in or without corporate limits : Provided that where the nearest lodges 
are within the city the consent of the outside lodges whose territorial 
jurisdiction is abridged, must also be obtained. Provided, further, that 
the Grand Lodge may, on the recommendation of the Grand Master, is- 
sue a dispensation for the formation of a new lodge, outside a city or 
town having three or more lodges, on the recommendation of two out 
of the three nearest lodges. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

A. B. Ashley, 
Delmar D. Darrah, 
H. T. Burnap, 

Committee. 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 93 

The amendments offered to the Constitution will go to 
the lodges for their action, both of them being seconded by 
a majority of Representatives. 

The amendment to the By-Laws having been seconded by 
more than twenty Representatives will be acted on next year. 

EEPOKT— Committee on Appeals and Grievances. 
The Committee on Appeals and Grievances presented its 
report through its Chairman, M.W. Bro. Monroe C. Craw- 
ford. 

M.JV. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M.: 

Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances fraternally submit the 
following report : 

No. 1. 
Herder Lodge No. 699 
vs. 

Action of the lodge set aside and the defendant declared guilty as 
charged, and that he be expelled from all the rights and privileges of 
Masonry. 

No. 2. 
McLean Lodge No. 469 
VS:. 

Action of the lodge set aside and defendant declared not guilty, and 
restored to all of the rights and privileges of Masonry. 

No. 3. 
Ben LIur Lodge No. 818 
vs. 

Action of the lodge sustained. 

No. 4. 
Covenant Lodge No. 526 
vs. 

Action of the lodge sustained. 



94 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

No. 5. 
Covenant Lodge No. 526 
vs. 

Action of the lodge set aside and the case remanded for new trial 

No. 6. 
Milton Lodge No. 275 
vs. 

Case continued, and Milton Lodge ordered to send up the complete 
record of the charges, specifications, evidence and action of the lodge. 

No. 7. 
Carnation Lodge No. 900 
vs. 

Case continued, and the lodge ordered to send up a complete tran 
scription of the evidence in this case. 

No. 8. 
Mason Lodge No. 217 
vs. 

Action of the lodge set aside and the brother restored to all of the 
rights and privileges of Masonry. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

Monroe C. Crawford, 
Joseph E. Dyas, 
H. H. Montgomery, 
G. R. Smith, 
A. W. West, 

Committee. 
The report was adopted. 

REPORT— Special Committee on Recognition. 

The report of the Special Committee of five, appointed at 
the last session of the Grand Lodge on the question of the 
recognition of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, was pre- 
sented. The views of the minority were also given. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 95 



Report of Committee 

Your Committee have had under consideration the following reso- 
lution : 

Whereas, The Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico possesses exclusive 
control and undisputed authority over the three degrees of Ancient Craft 
Masonry, to-wit : The degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and 
Master Mason, within the territorial limits of the Republic of Mexico ; and, 

Whereas, The several lodges subordinate thereto are conferring the 
said degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry in conformity with the ancient 
landmarks and usages of the institution of Freemasonry; and, 

Whereas, Fraternal recognition has been extended to the said Grand 
Lodge Valle de Mexico by the Grand Lodges of Arizona, Arkansas, Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, In- 
diana, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Mississippi, Michigan, Manitoba, 
Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, New Mexico, North Dakota, 
Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, England, Nova Sco- 
tia, New Brunswick, New South Wales, Tasmania, Victoria, all of which 
are recognized as regular by the M.W. Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons of the State of Illinois ; and with which fraternal re- 
lations have been firmly established ; therefore, 

Resolved, That the M.W. Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons of the State of Illinois hereby extends fraternal recognition of 
the M.W. Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico as the peer of all other sister 
Grand Lodges with which it enjoys relations of amity, and as such invites 
an exchange of representatives, thus aiding to preserve and strengthen 
the fraternal ties which bind the universal brotherhood of Masonry. 

This identical resolution, referred to the Committee on Correspond- 
ence in 1906, was acted upon and decisively denied at the Grand Lodge 
of 1907 ; whereupon the report of that Committee showed from the pub- 
lished proceedings of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico that that body 
was formed by the splitting up of one lodge, La Union Fraternal, into 
three lodges, in pretended compliance with the law of Masonry whose 
unvarying precedent had required the participation of three lodges to 
form a new Grand Lodge for a period of at least one hundred and six- 
teen years, this subterfuge attesting how thoroughly and universally that 
law was understood. 

The Committee on Correspondence, although satisfied that the lodge 
thus alleged to be dismembered was a clandestine body, said thai it did 
not deem it necessary to discuss that phase of the subject, it being 
enough to know that, even were the lodge regular, two, at least, of the 
alleged lodges resulting from this division must be unchartered bodies, 
and that this action was in no sense a compliance with the law requiring 
the participation of three regular lodges. The Grand Lodge took the 



96 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

same view, and, as already indicated, decisively refused recognition to 
the new body, or rather to a body which, under various names and 
guises, had existed since 1868. 

It would seem that this self-confessed dishonesty ought fully to have 
warranted the belief prevailing at the time that the question had been 
permanently disposed of, but in the Grand Lodge of 1908 the resolution 
was again brought forward, this time being presented by Most Worship- 
ful Brother Moulton, and referred to this Committee. The construction 
of this resolution and its sweeping assertion well illustrates the dangers 
to which Senator Benton called attention when he accused a brother 
Senator of having injected a stump speech into the belly of a bill. In 
the first place it places the Grand Lodge of Illinois squarely inantag- 
onism with the now well settled doctrine for which it has always stood, 
that the majority of the lodges, not less than three, existing in autono- 
mous open territory, have the right to form a Grand Lodge which shall 
possess absolute sovereignty therein. The resolution claims exclusive 
jurisdiction for the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico throughout the Re- 
public, everyone of whose twenty or more states is as completely autono- 
mous as the states composing the American union, and, hence, in the 
view of this Grand Lodge, fully entitled to a Grand Lodge of its own. 
The resolution, therefore, not only denies this great doctrine for which 
the Grand Lodge of Illinois has always stood, but it declares that it 
exercises undisputed sovereignty throughout the Mexican states ; when 
the fact is that, even were it a regular body, it could lay no shadow of 
a claim to exclusive jurisdiction outside of the Federal District of Mex- 
ico, a small tract bearing a similar relation to that Republic that the 
District of Columbia bears to the Republic of the United States. But 
the further fact is that there are several of the Mexican states possess- 
ing Grand Lodges claiming jurisdiction within their respective boun- 
daries, the number of which is not precisely known to this Committee, — 
probably six or eighty the evidence of the existence of which is to be 
found in the recent proceedings of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico 
itself. 

There can be no question as to the clandestine character of the body 
out of whose fragments the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico was alleged 
to have been built. Dust throwing is often indulged in by reference to 
the lodges chartered about 1824 through the influence of our Minister 
to Mexico, Mr. Poinsett, but all of those lodges went out of existence 
not later than around 1828, and there is no history of a charter of any 
regular lodge in Mexico since then, save one, — Toltec Lodge, which was 
chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. This charter, however, was 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 97 

withdrawn during the last decade of the nineteenth century, and its 
members, yielding to commercial considerations, sought to receive a 
charter from the Gran Dieta Simbolica, under which name the Grand 
Lodge Valle de Mexico practically existed during the ten years from 
1890 to 1900, nominally as one of the constituents of the gran dieta but 
really, through the domination of Eimilio G. Canton, who was Grand 
Master of one and Grand Secretary of the other, its other self. 

It was through the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico that woman Ma- 
sonry with all its scandals, which finally became so rank as to stifle 
the gran dieta in its own atmosphere, came into that body, carried thence 
from the Scottish Rite, in whose bodies women attained as high as the 
Fourteenth Degree before that time. 

It is manifest that nothing but purely commercial considerations could 
have induced regular American Masons to practically repudiate their 
obligations and attempt, as has been done, to convert a clandestine, aris- 
tocratic, hierarchical organization into the free representative common- 
wealth of absolutely equal rights and eligibilities — the Fraternity of Free 
and Accepted Masons. 

That the pressure for recognition is a purely commercial one is shown 
by the history of the so-called Grand Lodge of Costa Rica. Like the 
Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico of Scottish Rite origin, while no less 
than half a dozen lodges participated and everything was regular ex- 
cept the genesis of the lodges themselves, there has been absolutely no 
pressure for the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Costa Rica, simply 
because the commercial relations of the two peoples have not, as in the 
case of Mexico, become increasingly intimate. 

We come now to the core of this subject, the question of loyalty to 
our obligations to Free and Accepted Masonry; that Masonry which we 
all received on condition that it should be preserved unchanged ; that 
Masonry on which all other so-called Masonic organizations have been 
superimposed. It is manifest that, as the free and accepted Masonry 
which we received necessarily commanded our complete allegiance, no- 
body in the name of Masonry could lay us under obligations differing 
by a hair's breadth from those imposed by it. The chief of these obli- 
gations is that of obedience to the landmarks. It is these that deter- 
mine the form and character and constitute the spirit of Freemasonry. 
They define Masonry and the constitution of every Grand Lodge makes 
their preservation unchanged the first of Masonic duties. 

While it is the fashion of some whose perceptions seem to be cleared 
by the claim of multitudinous degrees and the clamor of high-sounding 
titles to attempt to whistle the landmarks down the wind on the alleged 



-7 



( J8 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

ground that there is a great difference as to what they are, the conclu- 
sive fact stands out beyond the possibility of gainsaying that throughout 
the world of free and accepted Masonry, which constitutes at least nine- 
teen-twentieths of all the alleged Masonry in the world, there is a sub- 
stantial agreement among the Grand Lodges as to what the landmarks 
determine and circumscribe as Masonry. Acknowledging their para- 
mount obligation to the landmarks, they necessarily teach as Masonry 
that which is thus determined and circumscribed, and the fact that they 
all teach substantially the same thing, many of them, like the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois, paying hundreds of dollars annually to teach and im- 
part it, shows how general and instinctive is the consensus as to what 
the landmarks cover and require. 

It is past comprehension how any Scottish Rite Mason of the North- 
ern Jurisdiction of the United States of America can claim any author- 
ity in free and accepted Masonry. It has no more authority to charter 
lodges than has a Commandery of Knights Templar or a Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons, each of which is built upon Masonry but without 
claiming any rights in it. When it was reported that the Scottish Rite 
Masons claimed authority in Free and Accepted Masonry, Grand Master 
Cregier of Illinois wrote Josiah H. Drummond, the head of the North- 
ern Jurisdiction, and asked him if it was so. Mr. Drummond's reply 
was as strong as it could possibly be made, disclaiming any authority in 
Ancient Craft Masonry and said that the constitutions excluded any 
such claim, adding "if this disclaimer is not strong enough write it 
stronger and I will sign it." 

Not less strong is the language of Henry L. Palmer now and for 
many years the head of the Supreme Council of the Northern Jurisdic- 
tion in a report to the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin. He says, "The im- 
pudent assumption of the right of the Grand Council of the 33d De- 
gree to constitute and administer symbolic lodges A.F. and A.M. is a 
right which Supreme Councils of the 33d Degree never possessed and 
which we believe they have never before attempted to exercise." 

The fifteen points of the Master's obligation, without assenting to 
which no master has ever been installed, were agreed to as the same as 
the Charges of a Freemason, possess like, those charges the landmark 
quality. In conformity with these requirements every Master on this 
floor has agreed as a condition of accepting power that "no new lodge 
shall be formed without permission of the Grand Lodge" (not the per- 
mission of a Supreme Council or a Grand Commandery), coupled with 
a solemn agreement "to respect genuine Masons and to discontenance 
all dissenters from the original plan of Masonry." 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 99 

Loyalty to the landmarks and to the steadfast record of the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois in withstanding all impostors and dissenters from the 
original plan of Masonry — loyalty to our own consciences requires us to 
advise that the resolution does not pass. 

Joseph Robbins, 

Chairman. 

We concur in the recommendation made by the chairman, M.W. Bro. 
Joseph Robbins, that the resolution does not pass. 

Owen Scott, 

Monroe C. Crawford, 

Wm. B. Wright, 

Committee. 



Separate Report oe Brother George M. Moulton 

A MEMBER OE THE COMMITTEE. 

To the M.W. Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., ,of the State of Illinois, 

Greeting: 

The undersigned, in behalf of the innumerable host of Masons, who 
sympathizing with our brethren of the sister republic of Mexico in their 
heroic and self-sacrificing efforts to uplift the cause of Masonry in their 
midst and establish that God-given institution in their land, in all its 
purity and majesty, have recognized their claims for fraternal recogni- 
tion, and extended the hand of fraternal fellowship, does hereby dissent 
from the report submitted by the chairman of the committee, having un- 
der consideration the proposition of extending fraternal recognition, and 
entering into relations of unity and concord, with the Grand Lodge Vallc 
de Mexico, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and in support of such 
action submits the following: 

The majority report is devoid of either facts or findings by which 
to justify the adverse recommendation with which it concludes regard- 
ing the resolution of recognition now pending before you. It is truly a 
rather forceful expression of the personal views of its author, with 
which in theory, there will be no contention among all good and true 
Masons wheresoever dispersed, except insofar as the endeavor is made 
to show that our Mexican brethren as at present organized are without 
the sphere of our fraternal recognition, by reason of alleged irregularity 
in the formation of their Grand Lodge, or being at variance with those 
well grounded, well established and fully accepted principles expressed 
by the writer of the report from which we dissent. 



100 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

It is worthy of note that the remaining members of the committee, 
whose names are thereto appended, have not foreclosed themselves in 
this regard, but have limited themselves to a concurrence in the adverse 
recommendation, presumably for reasons that appeared good to them, 
although not necessarily in harmony with the views expressed by the 
Chairman of the Committee, otherwise their unqualified assent would be 
shown by their signatures to the report without further addition or 
qualification. 

Exception is taken to the emphatic statement contained in the open- 
ing paragraph of the report and reiterated in the following paragraph 
thereof, to the effect that the pending resolution was "decisively" denied 
at the Grand Lodge of 1907. Such a statement unchallenged might lead 
the wavering mind to believe that the advocates of the cause embraced 
in the resolution were in a hopeless minority, whereas it is no strain 
upon truth to affirm that the Grand Lodge was very nearly equally di- 
vided upon the proposition. Truly the Noes were in excess of the Ayes, 
and hence the result of the vote was decisive, but it is confidently be- 
lieved that in the light of present knowledge of conditions the resulting 
vote on the pending resolution will be more decisively registered in its 
favor. 

In regard to the very much mixed metaphor attributed to the late 
Senator Benton, by which an anatomical monstrosity is charged against 
the author of the pending resolution, a careful and critical reading of 
the resolution fails to reveal any part of its anatomy, if a resolve may 
have such a qualification, where a speech delivered from a stump or 
otherwise has found lodgment. Neither does the resolution by its terms, 
if adopted by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, place that august body in any 
attitude of antagonism with the established doctrine in respect to the 
formation of Grand Lodges in Masonry or the sovereignty thereof. On 
the contrary it reaffirms and accentuates that very doctrine, and only 
leaves the fact to be determined whether or not the Grand Lodge Valle 
de Mexico does maintain a lawful existence under the established doc- 
trine of our institution. 

It is conceded that the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico does not pos- 
sess, neither does it claim exclusive jurisdiction over the entire territo- 
rial area of the Republic of Mexico. The statements made in the report 
that the Republic of Mexico like that of the United States is composed 
of numerous autonomous states, each one of which is entitled to a 
Grand Lodge of its own, legitimately formed is quite correct and the 
preamble of the pending resolution is to this extent in error. The com- 
parison made in the report between the scope of the Federal District in 
Mexico and the District of Columbia in the United States is a happy and 



1909.) % Grand Lodge of Illinois. L01 

appropriate one. The Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico has an equal right 
to the Masonic jurisdiction of the Federal District of Mexico that the 
Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia enjoys, a right by the way 
which the latter has formally accorded to the former in common with 
forty-three or more other Grand Lodges of which twenty-eight or more 
are of the United States received and acknowledged as such by the 
Grand Lodge A.F. and A.M. of the State of Illinois. 

The proposition now under consideration does not deal with other 
Grand Lodges existing in the Republic of Mexico. We need have no 
apprehension of a conflict of authority in recognizing Grand Lodge Valle 
de Mexico as having exclusive jurisdiction and unrestricted sovereignty 
over the territorial limits of the Federal District of Mexico since it has 
neither rival nor contestant for such powers or authority. 

It is claimed, and there is much confirmatory evidence of the truth of 
the claim, that a Grand Lodge of A.F. and A.M. was regularly formed 
in the City of Mexico in the year 1825, the three constituent lodges from 
which it was formed having been chartered by Grand Lodges of the 
United States, one at least emanating from the Grand Lodge of New 
York. The internal disturbances and civil wars resulting in the over- 
throw of several governmental administrations in the country, and espe- 
cially the inimical attitude of some of those administrations and those 
in power towards the institution of Masonry conspired to defeat the 
laudable aims of the founders of the institution in Mexico. Lodges reg- 
ularly formed ceased to exist or lay dormant as would be inevitable in 
any country so torn by dissension, and ruled by avarice and ignorance 
as was Mexico for so many years. It was only under the beneficent 
administration of Diaz, himself a devoted Mason, that the forces of 
reason and intelligence resumed sway and Masonry again attracted its 
votaries to take active interest and give earnest encouragement to its 
uplifting and righteous purposes. In the meantime during the chaotic 
condition of affairs, civil and otherwise, Masonry in Mexico drifted from 
the established course at times. Unskillful pilots and unprincipled mas- 
ters brought the good ship of Masonry into troubled waters, where 
amid the breakers of ignorance and the rocks of evil practice the craft 
well nigh was overwhelmed in irretrievable ruins. But an all wise 
Providence did not so ordain, and finally the remaining elements of the 
institution, tried by adversity, purified by sacrifice, strengthened by truth, 
animated with loyalty, and led by unselfish brethren strong in purpose 
and sturdy in its accomplishment, have firmly established a governing- 
body for Ancient Craft Masonry in the Federal District of Mexico, 
whose sway is unquestioned, whose aims and purposes arc pure, noble 
and exalted, whose administration is faultless, whose fellowship is un- 



102 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

tainted with aught that is objectionable. Notwithstanding its pedigree 
through unavoidable causes is not as distinctly traceable as the Grand 
Lodges formed in the tranquility with which our own country has been 
blessed, and notwithstanding the fact that through unwise leadership and 
perverted ideas there have been deviations in the past from the paths of 
rectitude, freely admitted, humbly attoned for, and from which being ut- 
terly redeemed, absolution for the sins of omission and commission by 
our Mexican brethren is now fairly due. 

The reference in the report under consideration to the non-recogni- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of Costa Rica, by reason of no movement in 
that direction being made of that character, is not germane to the ques- 
tion at issue. Such a proposition has no more place in the present dis- 
cussion than the Papal bull of ex-communication against the faithful of 
the church who might perchance be the votaries of Masonry. It is en- 
titled to no more weight than the negative testimony introduced by the 
purloiner of his neighbor's chickens that notwithstanding there was one 
affirmative witness to his depredations, there were at least nine others 
who failed to observe the alleged overt act. The Costa Rica condition 
will be cared for in due time and its recognition undoubtedly determined 
according to the merits of the case, just as was done by the Grand Lodge 
of Illinois in 1898, when the Grand Lodge of Cuba came knocking at 
our door and received a fraternal welcome to an acceptable union of 
interests which has grown stronger and dearer ever since, notwithstand- 
ing the pedigree of that new comer in the galaxy of legitimate Grand 
Lodges was equally as obscure, and clouded with the same doubtful 
origin, as that of its sister republic now seeking a nook in our fraternal 
hearts, and the opportunity to work hand in hand towards the accom- 
plishment of a universal brotherhood of man under the Fatherhood of 
God. It is no discredit, that the intimate social and commercial relations 
existing and constantly growing between the sister republics of the 
United States and Mexico make the demand for recognition of the 
Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico more imperative than would be otherwise 
the case if there were a lack of common interest between the peoples of 
those nations; nor should such a desirable condition as now exists in 
that respect operate to the disadvantage of our brethren in Mexico in 
considering the admissability of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico into 
Masonic communion and fellowship. We boldly proclaim that condition 
as a potent reason why slight irregularity, obscure links in the genealog- 
ical chain, divergencies in the troubled past from the straight path of 
Masonic progress, and doubtful procedure in times of stress and tribu- 
lation, should be leniently overlooked and condoned, especially in view 
of the present-day exemption from all evil ways and unsavory practices, 
and in the radiant light of our happy experience from a similar forgiving 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 103 

and forbearing spirit shown to that other child of doubtful ancestry, the 
Grand Lodge of Cuba, whose Masonic standard now is hailed with glad 
acclaim by every governing body of Ancient Craft Masonry with which 
the Grand Lodge of Illinois is in accord and relations of amity. 

The cry which has been raised that we would violate our obligations, 
infringe upon the landmarks of Masonry, or detract from our fealty to 
the institution, by extending the fraternal recognition contemplated by 
the pending resolution, need cause no feeling of apprehension in the 
mind of any loyal widow's son in this jurisdiction or elsewhere. The 
heavens did not fall, nor the earth rise up in convulsions, neither did 
any of the craft suffer the pains of excommunication by reasons of ex- 
tending the fraternal hand of fellowship to our Cuban brethren, not- 
withstanding the Grand Lodge of Cuba could not trace its genealogy di- 
rect and untainted from the Mother Grand Lodge of England. The 
Grand Lodge of A.F. and A.M. of the State of Illinois is supreme in its 
sovereignty over all things Masonic within its jurisdiction. Ever since 
the institution of Masonry has existed the beneficent art of healing has 
been a remedy for all irregularities in Masonic procedure. When our 
Grand Lodge in the exercises of its wisdom and inherent fundamental 
law by its dictum places the seal of approval upon the constitution of 
the present Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, it is just as effective so far 
as the Masons of Illinois are concerned in removing any possible stigma 
upon its birth or origin, and relieving it from any of the pains and pen- 
alties of possible misdeeds or mistaken acts, as when the Supreme Archi- 
tect of the Universe proclaimed "Let there be light" and there was light, 
where darkness reigned before on the face of the deep. No landmark, 
or ancient charge of Freemasonry, or any obligation ever placed upon 
us as Masons ever restricted the power of the Grand Lodge from doing 
all things for the good of Masonry within its territorial jurisdiction not 
in direct contravention of the landmarks and ancient charges of Free- 
masonry. Grand Lodges have ever been conceded the right for just 
cause and on reasonable grounds to place the ban of non-intercourse on 
the Masons of another jurisdiction, and yet our relations are undisturbed 
with the Grand Lodge which thus severs its relations with one of our 
sister Grand Lodges bound to us with the ties of fraternity and bonds 
of amity. For like reasons Masonic recognition may be extended by 
one Grand Lodge to another without disturbance of the Fraternal rela- 
tions existing between the Grand Lodge thus extending recognition, and 
its colleagues, even though some of the latter may withhold that recog- 
nition for reasons deemed to be adequate. 

The pending resolution involves no question of the so-called higher 
degrees in Masonry. For the purposes of the present argument it may 



104 Proceedings of the (October 13. 

be considered that the degree of Master Mason is the climax in Ma- 
sonry with the possible reservation that the Royal Arch Degree was orig- 
inally included in the ritual of the Master Mason's degree but is now 
universally conceded to be the property of another Masonic organization. 
How or why Grand Lodges of A.F. and A.M. were bereft of this es- 
sential element in the legend which forms the basis of Freemasonry, is 
unknown to the writer, but it is evident that one very important innova- 
tion in the original plan of Masonry, and some one or many must have 
become in a measure dissenters therefrom, and yet Freemasonry still 
survives. The Royal Arch Chapter of Illinois, with which our symbolic 
lodges work in unison and concord welcome within their tiled precincts, 
where none but Master Masons can ever enter, the Royal Arch Mason 
hailing from the Valle de Mexico, and yet that sojourning brother and 
each of the brethren whom he meets in the Chapter is barred from ad- 
mission to the lodges which made it possible for them to be links in the 
same fraternal chain. The incongruity of such a condition is manifest. 
While it may be truly said that no other organization may make laws or 
establish precedents for the government of Master Masons, other than 
a Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., the recited condition of affairs empha- 
sizes the propriety of our Grand Lodge within the scope of its constitu- 
tional right, lifting the unnecessary and embarrassing burden now borne 
by its members who have sought further light in Masonry in the secret 
vault of the Chapter. 

There is no question involved in this discussion regarding the forma- 
tion of any new lodge without permission of the Grand Lodge, neither 
does any of the fifteen points of the Master's obligation apply. The 
simple and sole question to be determined by the Grand Lodge, A.F. and 
A.M., of Illinois, is whether or not the Grand Lodge A.F. and A.M., 
Valle de Mexico, is worthy of fraternal recognition, and its members in 
good standing are acceptable as brethren, entitled to all the rights and 
benefits accorded to brethren of like degree hailing from other jurisdic- 
tions with which our Grand Lodge holds fraternal relations. 

Attention is invited to another incongruity arising from the present 
condition. A Mason hailing from the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, now 
considered as irregular and clandestine may with perfect propriety dimit 
from his Mexican lodge and affiliate with some lodge of the obedience 
of any one of twenty-eight or more Grand Lodges of the United States 
recognized as legitimate by our Grand Lodge, and who have placed the 
seal of approval upon the Mexican work. Thereafter that brother is 
entitled to and will receive from the lodges and craft in Illinois all the 
fraternal recognition which is possible to accord to the brethren of his 
new affiliation regardless of his Masonic birth being illegitimate froir 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 105 

the present Illinois standard of legitimacy. The most rigid stickler for 
pure and unadulterated Freemasonry will concede this fact. Can it be 
possible that the mere process of dimission and affiliation can effect a 
regeneration or reformation of unfit material. Better by far cure the 
defect, if any exists, by direct methods and make a clean job of the un- 
dertaking without the necessity of engaging in any round-about process 
for securing the same result. 

Due regard should be given also to the fact, that under present condi- 
tions, and under the universal law of Masonry that no new lodge may 
be formed within the territory occupied by a Grand Lodge without its 
consent, it would be utterly impossible now or hereafter to form another 
Grand Lodge in the United States in the Federal District of Mexico 
without a wholesale violation of all the ethics of the institution of Ma- 
sonry. Even the most strenuous contender that at least three lodges 
chartered by some Grand Lodge or ledges of acknowledged legitimacy 
are prerequisite to the formation of a Grand Lodge in the Federal Dis- 
trict of Mexico, worthy of recognition by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, 
would not have the temerity to urge the formation of such new lodges 
in that district since nearly all the Grand Lodges of the world with 
which we are in accord, including the Mother Grand Lodge of England, 
and many others not so favored have formally recognized the supreme 
sovereignty of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico over Ancient Craft 
Masonry within the territorial limits of the Federal District of Mexico. 
If recognition be withheld from the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico and 
no new lodges can be legitimately formed there, the necessary result 
would be that the Federal District of Mexico would be forever a place 
of Masonic darkness unless the present Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico 
should voluntarily dissolve, which is a contingency impossible to con- 
template. 

In brief we find the following conditions and qualifications favorable 
to the recognition of Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico as a legitimate su- 
preme governing body of Ancient Craft Masonry and hence the peer of 
all other sister Grand Lodges with which the Grand Lodge, A.F. and 
A.M., of Illinois, holds fraternal relations : 

1. It is the legitimate survivor and successor of a Grand Lodge regu- 
larly formed in 1825 in the Republic of Mexico whose career is shrouded 
in darkness for a period of forty years, when the only remaining frag- 
ments of the organization were reformed and reorganized into the present 
Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico and continued as such to the present day. 

2. It is sovereign and independent as a governing body of Free and 
Accepted Masons exclusively within the limits of the territorial jurisdic- 



106 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

tion and so recognized by its sister Grand Lodges in the Republic of 
Mexico. 

3. It has absolute control over the degrees of Entered Apprentice, 
Fellow Craft and Master Mason within the limits of its territorial juris- 
diction, which right has been irrevocably conceded by the Supreme Coun- 
cil of Mexico of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite following the 
precedent established by the Scottish Rite Councils of this country but 
in a more formal emphatic and unmistakable manner. 

4. The several lodges of its obedience are conferring the degrees of 
symbolic Masonry in strict conformity with the customs and usages of 
Freemasonry and all their procedure in both grand and subordinate 
lodges is in strict accord with the ancient charges and landmarks of Ma- 
sonry. 

5. At least thirty-five Grand Lodges of this and other countries in fra- 
ternal relations with the Grand Lodge of Illinois, including the Grand 
Lodges of England and Scotland, and a dozen or more others claiming to 
be legitimate in every way, have formally recognized the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico as their peer and welcomed it to full Masonic fellowship. 

6. This practically universal recognition which has been extended by 
the Masonic world to the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico renders impos- 
sible the establishment of symbolic Masonry in the Republic of Mexico 
under any other auspices or control since any effort in that direction 
would be an affront to the great majority of the governing bodies of 
Masonry in the world, which would meet not only with their just re- 
sentment, but would justify them in characterizing as irregular and 
clandestine any invasion of the rights, powers and privileges of the Grand 
Lodge Valle de Mexico by the formation of any lodge or lodges within 
its territorial jurisdiction or that of the other Grand Lodges of the Re- 
public of Mexico with which it is allied. 

7. A fraternal alliance resulting from the extension of recognition 
and customar.y interchange of representatives with the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico would be of material benefit to the craft of Illinois. 
Each year the tide of travel and commerce towards that progressive and 
promising Republic of the South is increasing in volume and import- 
ance. At present the rights and benefits, the pleasures and beauties of 
Masonry are denied to our brethren sojourning in that land of promise. 
Let good, common sense prevail, and with the spirit of forgiveness for 
all past transgressions, extend the hand of Masonic fellowship to our 
brethren who are fighting nobly for the cause of Masonry where it has 
been sorely distressed at times and even now requires the utmost vigi- 
lance and cordial support for the preservation of its purity and majesty, 



1909.) . Grand Lodge of Illinois. 107 

being assured that we of Illinois will be received into the hearts of our 
Mexican brethren with an affectionate and enduring welcome. 

The undersigned urgently recommends to the M.W. Grand Lodge 
that the first preamble to the pending resolution be amended to conform 
with existing conditions so that it will conclude with the words "within 
the territorial limits of the Federal District of the Republic of Mexico" 
and that in this amended form the preamble and resolution be adopted 
by the M.W. Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., of Illinois. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Geo. M. Moulton, 

Of Special Committee, 

A motion was made to adopt the report of the Committee. 

An amendment was offered that the views of the minority 
be substituted for the report of the Committee. 

After full discussion the motion to substitute the amend- 
ment was lost. 

The report of the Committee was adopted. 

SECOND KEPORT— Committee on Appeals and Grievances. 
M.W. Bro. Monroe C. Crawford, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Appeals and Grievances, presented the report of this 
Committee, on matters reported by the Grand Master in his 
address last year. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State of Illinois: 

A decison of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, reported in his 

address to the Grand Lodge on October 6, 1908, has been referred to 

this committee with direction that the committee consider the same, 

and report our conclusions. 

That portion of the address of the Grand Master containing the 

decision is as follows : 

Appeals to the Grand Lodge. 

The question has been submitted to me whether it was the duty of 
the Secretary of the lodge in which an accused brother has been found 
guilty, where an appeal is taken to the Grand Lodge, to file a transcript 
of the charges, specifications and proceedings with the Grand Lodge, 
merely upon notice from appellant of his intention to appeal. 



108 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Section 3, Article 9, Part 3, does provide that "the appellant shall 
give the lodge appealed from notice of his intention to appeal within 
ninety days after notice of its action or decision has been given," etc. 
"The Secretary of such lodge under the direction of the Master, shall at 
least thirty days before the meeting of the Grand Lodge, transmit to 
the Grand Secretary an attested copy of all charges, specifications, pa- 
pers, proceedings and evidence in the case and if requested, furnish the 
appellant with a like attested copy." That section of the by-law would 
plainly indicate that it is the duty of the secretary to furnish the appel- 
lant a copy of the transcript and to file likewise a copy with the Grand 
Secretary, thus affectuating the appeal. 

It is to be observed, however, that Section 3, from which I have 
quoted, is an old provision of the law and was in our book of laws prior 
to its revision in 1905. In the revised edition of our Blue Book, Section 
8, Article 7, Part 3, is new, and that section provides "should an appeal 
be taken from the decision of the lodge in any case, the party taking the 
appeal, or the lodge if it orders the appeal, shall pay the cost of making 
a record of the appeal proceedings and of a transcript of the testimony 
and rulings above mentioned to be filed with the Grand Lodge." . That 
section provides that a transcript of the record and evidence shall be 
made and filed with the Secretary of the lodge in which the trial was 
had and shall remain thereafter in his custody and this is to be done in 
all cases whether an appeal is taken or not. The party appealing must 
procure a copy of that transcript and pay for making the same and then 
the copy for which he pays is to be filed with the Grand Secretary, thus 
perfecting the appeal. The two sections to which I refer seem to be in 
conflict but inasmuch as Section 8 of Article 7 last quoted is the last ex- 
pression of the legislative will, I held that that is the law governing ap- 
peals and that the secretary of the lodge is not required to file a trans- 
script of the record with the Grand Secretary without pay, but on the 
contrary that the party taking the appeal must pay for making the tran- 
script and that until that is done an appeal is not perfected. I have held 
that if it were the duty of the secretary of the lodge to file a transcript 
with the Grand Secretary merely upon notice that an appeal was desired, 
it would impose upon the lodge a very great burden and hardship when 
the purpose to appeal may have been entirely abandoned. I report my 
ruling on this question that the Grand Lodge may either approve it or 
dissent from it because there does seem to be a conflict in the two sec- 
tions of the by-laws quoted and because there are cases which have 
arisen in the state during the past year whose course has been con- 
trolled by my decision so rendered. 

I therefore respectfully request that this question may be considered 
and determined by the appropriate committee, preferably by the com- 
mittee on Appeals and Grievances. 

Your Committee reports that they have very carefully examined 
the decision made by the Grand Master and, that in their opinion, it 
very forcibly, clearly, and correctly construes Section 8, Article 7, Part 3 
of the Grand Lodge By-laws on the subject of appeals to the Grand 
Lodge, and will be a great aid and assistance to the Secretaries of 
Constituent Lodges, Committees of the Grand Lodge, especially the 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 109 

Committee on Appeals and Grievances, and the fraternity throughout 
this Grand Jurisdiction. 

Your Committee therefore recommend the approval of the deci- 
sion of the Grand Master, as contained in this report. 
All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Monroe C. Crawford, 

Joseph Dyas, 

H. H. Montgomery, 

G. R. Smith, 

A. W. West, 

Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

ORATION. 

Bro. Euclid B. Rogers, R.W. Grand Orator, delivered the 
Annual Oration. 

THE WORLD GROWING BETTER. 

All through the ages there has been a tendency on the part of peo- 
ple to idealize the past and to minimize the present. Yesterday was big, 
the past has produced big things and big men ; the products of the 
present are small and puny in comparison. The great performances have 
all been in the other years, and the great performers are dead. That 
despairing note was heard away back in the days of Ecclesiastes, the 
preacher, and it is heard today. 

At the opening of this century critics of our time cited the masters 
of art and song, and claimed that the Nineteenth century produced no 
names that will live forever. But the Nineteenth century produced an 
Emerson, a Webster, a Clay, a Tennyson, an Agassiz, a Darwin, a Hux- 
ley, a Spencer and a Beecher. So that if the century were too busy 
widening the liberties of men and increasing the wealth of the world 
to write very much poetry or paint many pictures it did not wholly 
fail even on the intellectual side. 

What lander of the past, what censor of the present would like to 
go back to the time when there wasn't a mile of good road in the coun- 
try, when to warm churches was an unholy proceeding, when one trav- 
eled on bouncing, jouncing stages, when one had his teeth pulled with- 
out gas and his legs cut off without ether, when even statesmen and 
divines didn't know how to spell, when England assumed the right to 
stop our ships on the high seas and impress freeborn citizens into her 



110 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

navy, when pickpockets gathered in droves at every public function, 
when such things as sanitation and vaccination and the isolation of 
disease were unknown, when the sands and shoals of our coasts were 
unmarked by light or signal, when coal or gas or electricity were 
never used. 

In other times we took a car 

Drawn by horses, if going far, 
And felt that we were blest. 

Now the conductor takes the fare 

And sticks a broomstick in the air 
And lightning does the rest. 

In other days along the street 

A glimmering lantern led our feet 

When on a midnight stroll. 
But now we catch, when night is nigh, 
A piece of lightning from the sky, 

And stick it on a pole. 

Time was when one must hold his ear 
Close to a whispering voice to hear, 

Like deaf men — nigh and nigher. 
But now from town to town he talks, 
And puts his nose into a box 

And whispers through a wire. 

Talk as one may of the glories of the past, no man would care to 
go back to its crudities and inconveniences. 

Concededly, there has been progress and improvement in material 
things — in the matter of comfort and convenience there can be no ques- 
tion but that the present is far and away ahead of the past; men are 
richer, better fed and better dressed and know more than ever. "But," 
censorious spirits are wont to ask, "What does all this amount to? Have 
the improvements in methods and things done anything worth while 
for the man and the race? Has the advance along material lines worked 
any change for the better on the lives of men, Is the world a better 
world down at the heart of it?" 

Of course a positive and mathematical answer is impossible — the 
field of inquiry is too vast, racial character is too secret and subtle. 
And yet any sort of comparison of present conditions with past condi- 
tions will show any thoughtful man who has a bit of hope in his make- 
up that the trend of the world is upward. I hold to the philosophy of 
possible and actual world betterment. I believe that there are more 
men today than ever who hold the cheeriest good-will toward all their 
fellows — I maintain that from the standpoint of goodness the world is 
a better world today than ever in its history, and I'll tell you the why 
and wherefore of my belief. 



IN*.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. Ill 

"Growing better," what do I mean by that? I shall enter into no 
academic or theological discussion of that phrase but I shall speak of it 
in a very plain, understandable, practical fashion. When you say that 
a man is growing better you mean that his sense of justice is keener, 
his morals are cleaner, he's more humane, he's more considerate of his 
fellows, and that his religion has taken firmer grip upon his heart and 
life. That, in ordinary parlance is what one means when he says that 
a man is growing better, and that sort of a definition is good enough 
for all practical purposes when we speak of the aggregation of men. 
the world, growing better. 

The sense of justice, it's wider-spread and of finer fiber than ever. 
There's a marked improvement in the spirit of legislation. "Human 
rights must be protected, and offenses against the law must be pun- 
ished," that sentiment has been growing with the years. 

The rights of woman, that means something today. In other days 
woman had no rights; she belonged as a chattel to the man just as a 
hog or a horse belonged to him. Her husband gave her presents, and 
yet those presents under the law were still his. He could beat her, he 
could deprive her of the guardianship of her children. It was not until 
the end of the Seventeenth century that woman had the right to the 
separate use of her property, and not until the middle of the Nineteenth 
century was she recognized and protected by legislation as a person, 
entitled to work and receive wages, and to use her earnings as she 
pleased. 

Justice for the children, that's been on since the English Factories 
Act of 1833. The child has the right to life and growth, physical, men- 
tal and moral, and no employer and no parent shall deprive the child 
of his God-given, inalienable rights. And even if his bent be toward 
the wrong the spirit of the law now is, "turn him about and give him a 
chance." That's what juvenile courts and probation officers and all that 
mean. The state is trying to mother the child into good citizenship. 

Back in 1899 a babe was stolen from its mother in New York City. 
The papers were full of the story of the abduction, and when a strange 
woman appeared in a village thirty miles away with a babe in her arms, 
she was suspected. The daughter of a storekeeper got the daily paper 
with the babe's picture in it. "That's the baby sure," was the way she 
and others felt. The deputy sheriff was put on the scent, and away 
he started for a warrant, twelve miles away. Every farmer on the road 
was interested and ready to help ; the whole country-side was alive 
with excitement. The father was sent for, and there wasn't a dry eye 
in the great throng as the little one put out its arms toward the father. 
On their- return, at the Weehawkcn ferry, a great crowd had gathered 
to pay heartful welcome, and all the way from the ferry to his home 



112 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

the carriage was followed by a happy, cheering crowd. "Marian Clark 
is found," — the word went like magic and up flew windows and out 
popped heads all along the way, and in front of the Clark residence 
5,000 people had gathered to welcome the baby's return, and then every- 
body wanted to see the mother with the baby in her arms, and they 
shouted, "Bring the baby to the window." 

A chubby, golden-haired baby in its mother's arms, a tiny hand 
fluttering a salutation to the cheering multitude, a background of joyous 
faces in a gas-lit room, that was what that crowd saw that night in front 
of Mr. Clark's home. A thousand mothers, when they heard of the 
abduction, clasped their little ones more closely to their breasts and 
prayed to God for the babe's rescue — a thousand mothers clasped them 
more tightly still when they heard of her recovery, and thanked' God 
that the child was found. 

That's the spirit, the spirit of motherhood, the spirit of justice to 
the child that has gotten into the laws of the nations. 

October 15, 1894, Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, of the 14th artillery, was 
arrested in Paris, and for fifteen days he lay in jail in ignorance of the 
charge against him. He was a Jew, and by the anti-Semitic papers 
Dreyfus was charged with treason. January 5, 1895, the prisoner was 
publicly degraded in the courtyard of the Ecole- Militaire, and on Feb- 
ruary 9 was transported to Devil's Island. Madame Dreyfus made heroic 
efforts for her husband's release. Zola, the novelist, wrote an open let- 
ter, charging the staff offices with conspiracy, and daring the govern- 
men to prosecute him for libel. France accepted the challenge and he 
was twice tried and twice convicted, and here are some things Zola 
said to the jury in his defense, February 21, 1898: "The Dreyfus case! 
ah, gentlemen, that has now become a very small affair. It is lost and 
far-away in view of the terrifying questions to which it has given rise. 
There is no longer any Dreyfus case. The question now is whether 
Fiance is still the France of the rights of man, the France that gave 
freedom to the world, and that ought to give it justice," and then he 
continued, urging France to remember justice, to do justice. It was 
for justice that Emile Zola made his plea, and he closed like this : "Drey- 
fus is innocent ! I swear it. I stake my life on it, my honor. At this 
solemn moment, in the presence of this tribunal, which is the repre- 
sentative of human justice; before you, gentlemen, who are the very 
incarnation of the country, before the whole of France, before the 
whole world, I swear that Dreyfus is innocent. By my forty years of 
work, by the authority that this toil has given me, I swear that Dreyfus 
is innocent. By the name I have made for myself, by my works which 
have helped for the expansion of French literature, I swear that Dreyfus 
is innocent. May all that melt away, may my works perish, if Dreyfus 



fcW).; Grand Lodge of Illinois. 113 

be not innocent. He is innocent. All seems against me — the two cham- 
bers, the civil authority, the most widely-circulated journals, the public 
opinion which they have poisoned. And I have for me only the ideal, — 
an ideal of truth and justice. But I am calm: I shall conquer. I was 
determined that my country should not remain the victim of lies and 
injustice. I may be condemned here. The day will come when France 
will thank me for having helped to save her honor." 

Zola was convicted, exiled, died, was buried, and his body exhumed, 
and on the 4th of June, 1908, reburied with honors in the national 
Pantheon, and France did then and there and will forever thank Emile 
Zola for having helped to save her honor. 

Don't you remember when the farcical trial came to an end and on 
the 9th of September, 1899, Captain Dreyfus was convicted and sen- 
tenced to ten years' imprisonment, how the world fairly shuddered. It 
was wrong, it was unjust. France felt it, the world felt it, and then 
came the reaction, and Dreyfus' acquittal and Zola resting forever in 
a nation's heart. 

Tell not this people, or any people of successful wrong." The ages 
have taught us that the gain of injustice is loss, that its pleasure is pain. 
Iniquity may seem to prosper, but its success is its defeat and shame. 
The villain deceives himself. The oppressor, starving his brother's body 
starves his own soul, and at death creeps out from under his unjust 
gains, poor and naked and miserable. Justice with noiseless foot fol- 
lows the wrong doer and at last gets his iron hands around his neck. 
Justice is the idea of God, the ideal of man, and the ideal is becoming 
actual. The justice of the perfectly just God is more and more being 
worked out through human law. 

And the world is more humane than ever, as is emphatically evi- 
denced by our criminal laws. Some of the offenses of the older days, 
such as heresy and witchcraft and nonconformity in religion are no 
longer known. It is not many generations since the prison was regarded 
merely as a place of detention, and the penalties for crime were death, 
mutilation, burying alive, whipping and other forms of torture. With 
culture and refinement came milder treatment. 

And then it began to dawn upon men that graded terms might not 
be right, as a perfectly just scale of demerit could not be worked out. 
and if it could no human tribunal could apply it with equal and exact 
justice, and the indeterminate sentence has resulted. That means moral 
discipline and instruction, and if offenders prove amenable to it. they 
are released as evidencing ability to lead self-supporting lives. Refor- 
mation, not assent to the religious or moral standards of any man or 
group of men, but conformity to the thought and purpose and essential 
requirements of civil order, that's what T mean by reformat ion. and 



114 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

that's what the state through its penal laws is, in the name of justice 
and humanity, trying to bring to pass. Present-day opinion is, that when 
any offender demonstrates that society is no longer in danger of any 
attack of any sort by him, he should be free. Keep the criminal until 
he is cured, and then let him go ; that's the humane sentiment of the 
legislation of the day. 

A decade ago there were low-browed critics who, with aspersions 
loud and foul, charged America with base and selfish motives in annex- 
ing Cuba and the Philippines. What had America ever done to justify 
such an indictment? Our fathers won liberty for themselves, and 
straightway flung wide their doors to the poor of every nation under 
the sun, and invited them to share the wealth of the new continent on 
equal terms with those who had won it by their treasure and their 
blood. But over the days and over the boys of 1898 history has un- 
furled the banner of "Man's love for his Fellowman." To him who 
walks over the fields of Waterloo and Balaklava comes the sad ques- 
tion: "What was it all about? Why did it have to be?" There's some- 
thing martial about Tennyson's "Charge of the Light Brigade," but 
there's no massive logic back of the event. Of the 1,500 recorded bat- 
tlefields few are the number that have a magnificent and all absorbing 
idea underneath their carnage. What has even famed Waterloo to tell? 
"Ought Napoleon to have won or lost every battle that he led?" is still 
an open question among students of events. Neither Wellington's nor 
Napoleon's soldiers knew for what they were marching and bleeding 
and dying. But every day from April 20, 1898, when America sent her 
ultimatum to Spain, to the capture of Manila on the 13th of August, 
was big with historic significance, its rhetoric glowing with justice for 
an enslaved people. The infantry charged, the cavalry dashed into the 
fray, the battleships thundered in the name of an enlarged liberty. 
When the war opened the Cuban and other Islanders were stranger 
serfs, but when the war closed they were brothers of freemen and were 
free. 

"Call the roll, Sergeant Time. Match the day if you can ; 
Waterloo was for Britons — Manila's for Man." 

Emancipate the Philippines, set Cuba free from Spanish rule and 
then turn them back again as subjects of Castilian hate? That would 
be to return a rescued man into the hands of a mob who seeks his life; 
to do that would be to re-shut and re-bolt dungeon doors on the pris- 
oner who has been out reveling in a day in June ; to do that would be 
to show a poor soul how beautiful is heaven and then turn him face 
about and march him straight to hell. 

American patriotism took on heart and tone, and felt and said : 
"That policy is not American policy, Monroe shall not fetter McKinley. 



1909- ) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 115 

1823 shall not lord it over 1898. Faneuil Hall, Bunker Hill, Valley 
Forge and Gettysburg— 1620, 1759, 1776, 1789, 1812, 1861, all our great 
epochal years, everything that's American in thought, American in as- 
sociation, or American in sentiment is against this unjust and cowardly 
policy." And then we shouted so that Cervera heard, and Havana heard, 
and Madrid heard, the world heard "Spain shall never again bedeck 
herself with these jewels of the sea." From that hour America took 
her place at the forefront of what is to be the world's controlling race, 
and he was right who said "the ultimate capital of the English empire 
of the future will not be on the banks of the Thames, but either at the 
mouth of the Hudson or on the southwestern shore of Lake Michigan." 
Let America keep even step with God and of the constellations she 
shall forever be the Central Sun. 

"Your flag and my flag — 
And how it flies today. 
In your land and my land, 
And half the world away. 
Rose-red and blood-red, 
The stripes forever gleam ; 
Snow-white and soul-white — 
The good fore-fathers' dream ; 

Sky blue and true blue, with stars to shine aright 
The gloried guidon of the day, a shelter through the night.'' 

Our fathers thought and wrought and fought ; they conquered fate 
and circumstance, and achieved vast social treasure — treasures of field 
and factory and warehouse, where in all the world can you find their 
equal? Treasures of ideas and ideals — treasures of libraries and free 
schools and liberty. These are the true riches of a great civilization, 
and to pass the great treasure on to a generation of men illiterate in 
mentals or morals would be crime. Liberty of the big American sort 
can't live in an atmosphere of frivolous thinking and low morals. It is 
fatal to free institutions to foist ignorance and weakness and immoral- 
ity into the judgment seal. It's wrong for the state to place its forceful 
tools into the hands of stupidity and vice. To create wealth, social or 
material, requires brain and heart, and it requires just as much brain 
and just as big a heart to administer it. No generation of men is qual- 
ified to inherit any institution that's big with destiny for the race whose 
forehead isn't on a level with its predecessor who conceived it and 
built it and passed it on. The primal duty of this era is to be too 
wise to waste, too just to impair the good things that have come down 
to us, and to pass them on richer and larger by our own contribution. 
We won liberty for Cuba and set her up in housekeeping and started 
her on her national career. 

We won liberty for the negro, and in all history T know of nothing 
more splendid than the annals of southern chivalry since the war. They 



116 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

have taxed themselves, paying out of their poverty 120 millions of dol- 
lars to help uplift the black man and give him a chance for life. 

Humaneness, it's shown in our laws. March 3, 1873, this United 
States by act of the Congress, began caring for animals in transit by 
providing for rest, water and food. Laws have been enacted in all the 
states against cruelty to animals, and from the parent American Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals founded in New York in 
1886 hundreds of auxiliary organizations have sprung, until that field 
of humanitarian operation practically covers the whole country. 

"Black Beauty," who does not love it? "Bob, Son of Battle," and 
"The Call of the Wild," who has not wept over them? What an abiding 
interest attaches to that classic of the late Charles Dudley Warner 
wherein he recites the experiences of a deer in the Adirondacks, chased 
by men and dogs over hill and dale, through pond and river, until at 
last, exhausted and crazed with fright, it rushes into the village, as if 
as a last resort to throw itself upon the mercy of man, only to be 
hooted at and shot. That's a story of the past — it could not happen 
today — hearts have grown to be hearts, and man has a tender care for 
everything that has life. 

That story about Lincoln, we like to hear it ; how, while riding across 
the prairie he got off his horse and extricated two little pigs that had 
gotten mired in the mud — emancipation, it was working in his blood. 
That story will be read and loved all through the coming years, while 
the exploits of the big game hunters in American mountains or African 
jungles will bring the blush of shame to the cheeks of coming genera- 
tions. Men are coming to feel that the blood of the tiger ought to be 
breeded out of human veins. 

A Russian tells how, when he was a boy of ten, his father took 
him one day bird-shooting. As they tramped across the brown stubble 
a golden pheasant rose with a low whirr from the ground at his feet, 
and with the joy of the sportsman he raised his gun and fired, wild with 
excitement, when the creature fell fluttering at his side. Life was 
ebbing fast, but the instinct of the mother was stronger than death it- 
self, and with a flutter of her wings the mother bird reached the nest 
where her young brood was huddled, unconscious of danger. Then, with 
such a look of pleading and reproach that his heart stood still at the 
ruin he had wrought (and never to his dying day did he forget the 
feeling of guilt that came to him at that moment), the little brown 
head toppled over and only the dead body of the mother-bird shielded 
her nestlings. "Father, father," the boy cried, "what have I done?" as 
he turned his horror-stricken face to his father. But not to his father's 
eye had this tragedy been enacted, and he said, "Well done, my son, that 
was well done for your first shot, you will soon be a fine sportsman.'" 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 117 

"Never, father, never again shall I destroy any living creature. If 
this is sport, I will have none of it. Life is more beautiful to me than 
death, and since I cannot give life, I will not take it." That incident 
of his boyhood days awakened sentiments of mercy and kindness that 
colored all the writings of Turgeneff, the world-famed Russian novelist, 
and that same sentiment of mercy and kindness has gotten into the 
blood of countless men everywhere. There is an ever-increasing num- 
ber who take more delight in seeing birds flying and studying their 
haunts than in bringing them down ; more pleasure in watching the 
exquisite grace of the deer than in standing victor over its prostrate 
form while its pathetic and reproachful eyes glaze in death. This con- 
sideration of the rights of fowl and beast, is it not indicative of a larger 
manhood? must we not believe that this is a growing likeness to Him 
who marks the sparrow when it falls? 

Brotherhood, the Brotherhood of Man, high and holy thought of 
High and Holy God, how fares it? A young man was employed on the 
New York Herald. As he was leaving his boarding-house one morning 
he saw a hearse standing in front of the adjoining house. "Who is 
dead?" asked he of his landlady. "Sure, I don't know," was her reply, 
and it was said with such a tone of indifference that it fell like a clod 
on the heart of the sympathetic young Georgian who from his youth 
had sorrowed in every grief coming into the family of a neighbor. As 
he started down to his office a little coffin was being borne down the 
steps, followed by a mother who was crying as if her heart would 
break. He turned to ask his landlady if she was going to the funeral, 
when she said, "Sure, it's none of my affair." Such seeming heartless- 
ness made such an impression on that young men that he said to his 
wife, "Pack your trunks. I am going back to Georgia, where people 
have time to shed a tear with their neighbor when death removes their 
child, and where it is an affair of the whole neighborhood when grief 
invades the home. It is no home for us where our next-door neighbor 
is heart-broken and nobody cares about her grief." That young man 
got away from the confines that were jailing and limiting and crushing 
the very heart out of him ; he made up his mind that he'd give his 
heart room to grow in even if he gave up his job; he was going to 
live while he lived where he could feel; sympathy was part of his man- 
hood, and he was bound that it should have full chance for life and 
growth, and so he went back to his loved Georgia, and in speaking of 
Henry W. Grady, for it was he, John Temple Graves said, "No elo- 
quence has equaled his since Sargent Prentiss faded from the earth : 
no pen has plowed such noble furrows in his country's fallow fields 
since the wrist of Horace Greeley rested ; no age of the republic has 
witnessed such marvelous conjunction of a magic pen with the velvet 
splendor of a mellow tongue," ;md the brightest, most magnetic thing 



118 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

about this favorite son of yonder sunny south was not his intellect, 
though that was enough to lead any man to fame; not his tongue, 
though from it flowed sentences of silver that chained and charmed all 
his hearers to his noble will ; not these, but this : the heart of the man, 
the kindly feeling that he had for all; this it was that endeared him to 
all classes north and south. "His heart was the furnace where he fash- 
ioned all his glowing speech. Love was the current that sent his golden 
sentences pulsing through the world, and in the honesty throb of human 
sympathy he found the anchor that held him steadfast to all things 
great and true." 

A hundred years ago Italian cities were devastated with plagues, 
today they are as healthy as Paris or Denver. Who wrought the 
change and how was it done? From Constantinople to Venice John 
Howard took sail on an infected ship so that he might be arrested and 
confined in a lazaretto. He was arrested and he was confined and he 
traced the death-dealing plague to its source and, like a Knight Errant, 
he throttled it, and killed it, and its ravages were stayed. What made 
him do it? Brotherhood. "They have as much right to life and beauty 
and health and happiness and heaven as have I" — Brotherhood. Dark 
Africa is growing white under the bright light of advancing civilization. 
Why? Because that old Puritan soul, David Livingstone, faced thirty 
attacks of African fever and said to Stanley, "No, I'll not return; I'll 
net give up," and turned for the ninth time toward the headwaters of 
the Nile. Did he reach his goal? No, he died in a jungle, no white 
face near. Did he reach his goal? Yes, his last message, written with 
dying hand, "All I can add in my solitude is, may heaven's rich bless- 
ing come down on everyone who will help to heal this open sore of the 
world." That dying message reached the hearts of men on every shore, 
and they began to think and to act, and history tells us that during the 
next ten years Africa made greater advance than she had made in the 
previous ten centuries. Scotland, thou hast made the world rich ! — 
thou hast given us John Knox, the fearless; thou hast given us Bobby 
Burns, who made Scotia's thistle to blossom into the flower of verse 
that has perfumed the universal air ; thou hast given us great preach- 
ers, mighty pulpiteers like Chalmers and Guthrie and Begg; thou hast 
given us that Titan of the Trossachs, Thomas Carlyle, who battered 
cant and class and caste with an arm of steel.; thou hast given us men 
who walked in light and talked with God ; but the richest gift of all 
was the man who was born at Blantyre, March 19, 1813, and for thirty- 
three years flowered on Africa's burning sands. In incongenial soil, 
with his own hand and out of his own heart, David Livingstone planted 
God's oaks of Brotherhood, and now they're leafing and branching out 
and sheltering a race. 



i»09.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 119 

I am thinking of the stormy days of '63. I see a man single-handed 
and alone face hostile English hearts, and brave the mobs of the great 
English centers. In all the annals of eloquence I know not the equal 
of his mannificent performance. What matchless skill in choice of 
words ! How astonishingly ready in repartee ! turning the hiss of 
hatred into the cheer of sympathy. Before those turbulent mobs he 
stood and kept standing, until, voices stilled and hearts hushed, they 
heard his message — what was it? Freedom, Equality, Brotherhood. In 
Manchester and Glasgow and Edinburg and London and Liverpool in 
October of 1863, Henry Ward Beecher, with his own hands lifted the 
flag of the American Union from the gutter of British thought and ran 
it to the tip top of the pole and left it there, and when he set sail for 
his native shores he left the common people of England cheering. What 
did it all mean? The Brotherhood of Man. 

Brotherhood, how it burst out of human hearts when Chicago burned 
in 1871 and at the Johnstown flood in May of '89— the Galveston hor- 
ror of September of 1900, the bellowing of the storm, the onrush of the 
frenzied sea, the horrific carnival of the elements — we didn't see it but 
we felt it, the world felt it, and every man under every sky felt that 
every sufferer was his brother. And then came April 18, 1906, and our 
San Francisco hard by the western sea, is shaken off the world. The 
horror of it ; the hell of it ! for a moment every heart stopped beating, 
and then every man gathers all his manhood close 'round his heart and 
lets his heart, all of it go. Millions of money pour into the stricken 
city by telegram — train after train has the right of way as food and 
raiment and blankets hurry across the continent to the place of need. 
Lift up your head, O city by the Golden Gate ! with bread enough and 
to spare in this fair land you shall not perish with hunger, for you be- 
long and we belong, we all belong to one family whose Father's name 
is God. When the heart of the race flows like a river with love, even 
though it be for a single day, the race as a race can never be quite as 
small and selfish again. 

Justice, humaneness, kindness, gentleness, the brotherhood of man, 
these are the big, essential things, and devoted hearts known and un- 
known are working these up through the crust to the crest of individual 
and communal life. It's in "Middlemarch" that George Eliot says : "The 
growing good of the world is greatly dependent on unhistoric ads; 
and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been 
is greatly owing to those who have lived hidden lives, and rest in un 
visited tombs." So here's a health to the unnamed and unknown ! 



120 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

"What was his name? I do not know his name, 
I only know he heard God's voice and came ; 
BrougTit all he loved across the sea, 
To live and work for God — and me ; 
Felled the ungracious oak, 
With horrid toil; 
Dragged from the soil 

The thrice-gnarled roots and stubborn rock ; 
With plenty filled the haggard mountain-side, 
And when his work was done, without memorial died. 
No blaring trumpet sounded out his fame, 
He lived, he died, I do not know his name. 

"No form of bronze and no memorial stones 
Show me the place where lie his mouldering bones ; 
Only a cheerful city stands 
Builded by his hardened hands ; 
Only ten thousand homes 
Where every day 
The cheerful play 

Of love and hope and courage comes ; 
These are his monuments and these alone — 
There is no form of bronze and no memorial stone. 

"And I? 
Is there some desert or some boundless sea 
Where thou, great God of angels, wilt send me? 
Some oak for me to rend, some sod 
For me to break, 

Some handful of thy corn to take, 
And scatter far afield, 
Till it in turn shall yield 
Its hundredfold 
Of grains of gold 
To feed the happy children of my God? 

"Show me the desert, Father, or the sea, 
Is it thine enterprise, great God, send me. 
And though this body lie where ocean rolls, 
Father, count me among all faithful souls." 

A motion was made by M.W. Bra. Wm. B. Wright that 
the thanks of this Grand Lodge be tendered to the Grand 
Orator for his very excellent, eloquent and instructive oration ; 
that he be requested to furnish a copy of his oration to the 
Grand Secretary that it be printed in the Proceedings. 

The motion was adopted by a rising vote. 



J009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 121 

EEPOET— Committee on Lodges U, D. 
Bro. H. C. Mitchell, Chairman of the Committee on 
Lodges Under Dispensation, presented the report of his Com- 
mittee. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Illinois, A.F. and A.M.: 

Your Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation would respectful- 
ly report that there have been presented to it for its consideration the 
dispensations and returns of ten lodges, which have worked under dis- 
pensation since the last annual communication of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Lodge, and as a result of their labors, present the following re- 
port, to-wit : 

Bellflower Lodge, U.D. Bellflower. Illinois. 

A dispensation was issued March G. 190S, by M.W. Bro. Alexander 
H. Bell. The lodge was instituted March 14. 1908, by R. W. Bro. 
X. B. Carson, of Wade Barney Lodge Xo. 512. Bloomington, Illinois. 

The record of work is as follows: 

Xumber of petitions received 15 

Xumber elected 14 

Number rejected 1 

Xumber initiated 14 

Xumber passed • 14 

Xumber raised 14 

Xumber named in dispensation 12 

Xumber named in dispensation not signing charter. . 
Number petitioning for charter 26 

Whose names are as follows : 

Joseph M. Jordan. Arthur F. Gooch. Arthur L. Flint. George Hatch 

Flint, George H. Flint, William C. Morgan, Charles W. Johnson. 

William T. Kitts, Cary B. Kirk, Louis L. McCreight, Edwin C. Crews. 

Jesse T. Poe, George M. Carson, Ralph O. Edwards. William A. Paullin. 

DeWitt R. Gooch Jr.. Thomas Metcalf Wheeler. John H. Copenhaver, 

Isaac N. Rinehart. Charles A. Flint, William S. Bingham. Mayo Golden. 

Calvin H. Glardon. John J. Foster. Cora A. Parks. Andrew J. Johnson. 

At the last annual communication of the Grand Lodge, your com- 
mittee reviewed carefully the work of this lodge. and found the 
minutes had been kept in a very loose and imperfect manner, and that 
many errots had crept into the record work, and recommended that 
their dispensation be continued until the present session ^i the Grand 
Ledge, which was accordingly done. After reviewing the work of the 



122 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

lodge for the past year we are pleased to say that there has been great 
improvement in the work, and manner in which the minutes have been 
kept ; we therefore recommend that a charter be granted to this lodge 
as Bellflower Lodge No. 911. 

Stellar Lodge, U.D. St. Francisville, Illinois. 

A dispensation for this lodge was issued by M.W. Grand Master 
Alexander H. Bell, March 7, 1908, and the lodge was instituted March 
27, 1908, by R.W. Bro. J. R. Ennis, D.D.G.M. 46th District. 

The work of the lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 9 

Number elected 9 

Number rejected 

Number initiated 8 

Number passed 8 

Number raised • • 8 

Number named in dispensation 15 

Number named in dispensation not signing for charter 

Number petitioning for charter 30 

Whose names are as follows : 

John Gillespie, James M. Collison, William F. Jones, Charles W. 
Baker, Louis W. Jackman, Winfield S. Cluxton, Charles Burnett, John 
R. Brian, Clerance A. Hall, Robert J. McMurray, Charles E. Young, 
William C. Gillispie, Claud Green, William D. Nappier, Samuel H. 
Courter, John W. Brooke, Winfield S. Willhite, William A. Brian, James 
B. Brown, James Harley Ramsey, Edward Potts, Fred G. Buchanan, 
James H. Collison, Lyman Utter Brooke, Prentice R. Weeden, William 
F. Ball, William J. Daily, Harvey B. Fox, Clinton G. Beal, Forrest M. 
Denison. 

The record of Stellar Lodge was carefully reviewed at the last 
session of the Grand Lodge, and finding a number of irregularities, as 
well as violations of the Grand Lodge By-laws, the committee recom- 
mended that their dispensation be continued for another year. Your 
Committee now find that the record for the past year has been cor- 
rectly kept, and finding no errors, we therefore recommend that a char- 
ter be granted to this lodge as Stellar Lodge No. 912. 

Aaron Lodge, U.D. Chicago, Illinois. 

A dispensation was granted by M. W. Grand Master Alexander H. 
Bell on May 8, 1908. The lodge was instituted May 15, 1908, by R. W 
Bro. Harry W. Harvey, D.D.G.M., First District. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 123 

The work of the lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 61 

Number elected 52 

Number rej ected 3 

Number of petitions not acted on 6 

Number initiated 50 

Number passed 47 

Number raised • 46 

Number named in dispensation 39 

Number died . 1 

Number named in dispensation not signing for charter 8 
Number petitioning for charter 76 

Whose names are as follows : 

Albert L. Maurice, Harry Leonard Lathe, Joseph B. McNitt, Andrew- 
Custer Metzger, Charles Henry Burk, William Alonzo Lake, John J. 
Barnett, Frank Leadbeater Church, Charles Deutschmann, John Victor 
Borling, Wesley Eyer, George Wallin Bowen, William Albert Burns, Otto 
A. Gnewuch, William Albert Fraatz, Walter William Lackey, Allen 
George Schreiver, Arthur Stewart, Charles S. Stokie, Alfred Lickorish 
Winkless, Otto Banderob, Harry M. Kyle, Philip Waldorf, Grant Hamil- 
ton, Bennett Orrin Brown, Gale Bennett, William Dair, John Ault, 
Frank N. Hillis, Charles A. Pinney, Hiram David Eastman, Arthur Ellis 
Ames, William Taylor, Albert Luke Denman, William Coates, John 
Milne Murray, Adelbert Maurice Bassford, Robert James McElhaney, 
William Atkinson Garnett, Walter Wilson Rapp, Clarence Edgar Gard- 
ner, Fred Bertram Tedford, Robert Quait, George Washington Wright, 
Alfred Edward Erickson, Hugh Brown Craig, William Frederick Ell- 
feldt, Carl John Peterson, Frank Emil Paulson, Frank Arthur Davis, 
John Johnsen, Daniel Bailey, William Thompson Langton, Frankleing 
Joseph Higgason, George Edward LaMont, William Ferdinand Peter- 
son, Henry Janes Chenoweth, Edward Husband, Fred George Wirsing, 
Homer Harding Stout, John Fritz Eyer, George Rolla Lunt, Charles 
Francis Thomas, Frederick William Sorgenfrei Jr., Allan Roy Steele, 
Arthur William Eklund, Arthur Frantz, Fred Wubbel Jr., John Hender- 
son, David James Lewis, William Grover Murray, Friend Richard Ec- 
cles, Franklin Gifford Moore, Gilbert Alexander Sutherland, William 
Alexander Bradley, Thomas Henry Christy. 

After a careful review of the records at the last session of the 
Grand Lodge, your committee found that errors were so numerous and 
glaring that had crept into the work, and that the minutes had been 
kept in such a loose and careless a manner, that they recommended that 
the dispensation be continued until the present session of the Grand 



124 Proceedings of the (October 13. 

Lodge. Your committee find that the work of the lodge for the past 
year has been correctly done, and no errors whatever have crept into the 
record of the work ; we therefore recommend that a charter be granted 
to this lodge as Aaron Lodge No. 913. 

Republic Lodge, U.D. Chicago, Illinois. 

A dispensation was issued on February 22, 1909, by M.W. Bro 
Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted February 26, 1909, by 
R.W. Bro. Albert Roullier, D.D.G.M., of the Third District. 

The work of the lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 17 

Number elected 15 

Number rej ected • 

Number not acted on 2 

Number initiated 11 

Number passed 10 

Number raised 9 

Number named in dispensation 43 

Number named in dispensation, not signing for charter 

Number petitioning for charter , 53 

Whose names are as follows : 

William O. Peterson, Frederick Anson Brown, Parlane A. Mac- 
farlane, William J. Strickland, Ernest L. Kreamer, Oscar C. Hayward, 
Roger T. Farley, Guernsey D. Nevius, Welles W. LaMoure, Arthur M. 
Dean, William A. Mills, Henry Oscar Wernicke, Hokan Roll, Frederick 
Louis Brown, W. H. Collins, C. E. Williams, Jackson M. Prentiss, 
Thomas Madill, A. C. Nelson, Charles F. Parker, Richard Mueller, Carl 
Weber Preston, Evan Pusey, Bertrand E. Grant, Charles L. Griswold, 
Charles E. Thurber, Alvin E. Bastien, Edwin V. Cory, David H. Miller, 
John H. Gilchrist, George Albert Gardner, George M. Bixby, Ralph L. 
Walker, Earl W. Newton, Evan Rees, Fred S. Orth, William T. Mc- 
Lain, Arthur William Irwin, Fred Mueller Jr., Julius Searing Taylor Jr., 
J. A. Davidson, William H. Ott, William Louis Wilson, Angus M. Frew, 
Daniel L. Trotter, C. W. Grant, Sidney S. Chisholm, Thaddeus O. 
Bunch, Herbert R. Lloyd, S. H. Waddle, Clyde L. Day, Edward L. Beat- 
tie. 

The minutes of the lodge are very satisfactory, and your committee 
take pleasure in commending the Secretary for the correct and neat 
manner in which the records have been kept ; we therefore recommend 
that a charter be granted to this lodge as Republic Lodge No. 914. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 125 

Sesser Lodge, Sesser, Illinois. 

A dispensation was granted June 16, 1908, by M.W. Grand Master 
Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted July 14, 1908, by R.W. 
Bro. W. M. Webster, D.D.G.M. of the Forty-Fifth District. 

The record of work is as follows: 

Number of petitions received 16 

Number elected 12 

Number rejected 4 

Number initiated 12 

Number passed 10 

Number raised 10 

Number named in dispensation 21 

Number named in dispensation, not signing for charter 

Number petitioning for charter 31 

Whose names are as follows : 

George W. Harris, Riley D. Webb, James A. Jones, Cassie B. 
Lewis, Noah Isom, Harvey A. Patterson, Camdon E. Murry, Edward E. 
Jackson, Jasper P. Isom, Bartley A. McBride, David G. Martin, Burley 
A. Murry, James D. Isom, Alison M. Gilliam, John B. Martin, John F. 
Allen, Lacy M. Mayett, Emmett M. Jones, Franklin H. Bailor, Emza E. 
W T ard, William L. Allen, Lemuel B. Dawson, Harry P. Morgan, Charles 
E. Orr, George B. Gray, William W r ood, Ohio C. Galloway, Edgar E. 
Cockrum, William E. Cockrum, John E. Jordan, Caras A. McBride. 

The record of Sesser Lodge, U.D., was referred to your committee 
at the last session of the Grand Lodge, and showed so many errors. 
both in the record of work and imperfect manner in which the minutes 
were kept, that they recommended that their dispensation be continued 
until the present session of the Grand Lodge. We have again re- 
viewed the record with the following result, to-wit : The record last 
year did not show the names of brethren who recommended candidates 
for the degrees, which is in violation of Part Two, Article 13, of the 
Grand Lodge By-laws, and they have made identically the same mistake 
during the present year. From Nov. 10, 1908, to Apr. 6, 1909, all stated 
meetings were called regular, in violation of Sec. 1, Article 4 of the Grand 
Lodge By-laws. At the meetings of February 9 and April 6. 1999. the 
substance of the petitions is not given. This is a violation of Section 1. 
Article 13, Grand Lodge By-Laws. The Worshipful Master failed in 
every instance to report to the lodge on the petition of candidates. 
Section 2, Article 13, Grand Lodge By-Laws. On May 11th. 1909. the 
lodge received the petition of a candidate for the degrees in Masonry 



126 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

who had been rejected by another lodge, which is in violation of Sec- 
tion 6, Article 13, Grand Lodge By-Laws. June 16, 1909, shows that a 
F. C. was present when the lodge was opened on the third degree. 
In the face of the fact, that the lodge has made the same mistake in 
two instances that it made in the proceedings of last year, notwith- 
standing they were pointed out to them by your committee, we therefore 
recommend that the dispensation of Sesser Lodge, U.D., be again con- 
tinued until the next session of the Grand Lodge. 

Jackson Park Lodge, U.D., Chicago, Illinois. 

A dispensation for this lodge was issued June 8, 1909, by M.W. 
Grand Master Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted June 12, 
1909, by R.W. Bro. W. H. Beid, D.D.G.M. of the Fifth District. 

The record of work of this lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 38 

Number elected 29 

Number rej ected 5 

Number not acted on 4 

Number initiated 14 

Number passed 10 

Number raised 10 

Number named in dispensation 39 

Number named in dispensation not signed for charter 6 
Number signing petition for charter 43 

Whose names are as follows : 

Adam Schmidt, Walter E. Brickman, Wilbur B. Gibbs, Sophus Nep- 
kin, John Curtis House, John Thomas Brown, William W. Badger, 
Charles Dougherty, John A. Fraser, Frank J. Lambert, William Brou, 
Frank Hulse, Walter T. Phelps, Jay A. Ferguson, Thomas A. Marsh, 
George E. McBride, Elburn N. Harding, Carl Frederick Lochner, George 
Howard Dick, Henry J. Laenhardt, Jacob F. Snook, Henry Fred Laub, 
Sebastian C. Ferguson, George Hannauer, James E. Allwroth, Victor 
Highland, Arthur N. Hislop, Oliver H. Donaldson, Herman M. Wright, 
Thomas C. Stidham, William Gibbs Hastie, Albert F. Schroeder, William 
Miller, Elmer E. Wilson, Carl V. Tunelius, Albert F. Lewnau, Joseph 
Rosa, Ruby R. Hawk, Jessa A. Nichols, David D. Kagy, James C. Bar- 
saloux, John F. Downes, Lawrence C. Brown. 

The record of this lodge has been kept very neat and precise, and 
shows that the work has been satisfactorily done. Your committee 
recommend that a "charter be granted to this lodge as Jackson Park 
Lodge No. 915. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 127 

Ellwood Lodge, U.D.. Ellwood. Illinois. 

A dispensation for this lodge was issued November 7. 190$, by MAY. 
Grand Master Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted November 
19, 1909. by R.YY. Bro. John B. Fithian. D.D.G.M.. of the Seventeenth 
District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 16 

Number elected 14 

Number rej ected 1 

Number not acted on 1 

Number initiated 13 

Number passed 12 

Number raised 11 

Number named in dispensation 19 

Number named in dispensation not signing for charter 
Number signing petition for charter 30 

Whose names are as follows : 

Bruce T. Harley, George N. Blatt. Tames C. Beattie, Elry G. 
Spangler, George J. \Y. Eib. Henry G. Williams, George Elmer Gurney. 
Daniel N. Blatt. George H. Bridge. Arno J. Gurney. Henry Bradley. 
W. T. Hood. Garland F. Blatt. Matthias Jensen. Frank States Sr.. Elvis 
C. Noel. Albert M. Eib. Frederick Schweizer. Homer H. Wood. Alfred 
H. Blatt. James W. Mclntyre, Edwin Hutchison. Arthur H. Williams, 
Fred W. Spangler. Albert H. Goodwin. Edward L. Wilson, Charles K. 
Smalley, Clarence E. Efner. Benjamin D. Jones. Frank R. Jones. 

The minutes of this lodge are very unsatisfactory. They show a 
lack of neatness and a degree of carelessness that is inexcusable. The 
record shows profusion of expressions with little substance or sense. 
Everything is run together and hard to read. In no case does the 
record show that the fee was received with the petition, as required 
by Section 1. Article 13. Part Two. of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. But 
on the contrary the fee was received the night of the election of the 
petitioner. In one case where the applicant was rejected, the lodge 
voted to return the fee, while no record is made of its having been 
received, but erasures, interlineations and scratches appear on the 
minutes. Your committee therefore recommend that a charter be not 
granted and that the dispensation be continued in force until the next 
session of the Grand Lodge. 



128 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Welcome Lodge, U.D., Chicago. Illinois. 

A dispensation was issued June 15, 1909, by M.W. Grand Master 
Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted June 19, 1909, by R.W. 
Bro. Robert R. Jampolis, D.D.G.M., of the Second District. 

The work of this lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 18 

Number elected 15 

Number rejected 

Number not acted on 3 

Number initiated • • 13 

Number passed 3 

Number raised 3 

Number named in dispensation 119 

Number named in dispensation not signing for charter 2 
Number signing petition for charter 120 

Members names and what lodge late a member of : 
Harry Wells Modlin, Standard Lodge No. 873; James Brewer 
Child, William B. Warren No. 209; Oliver Stangland, Standard Lodge 
No. 873 ; Abner Carlos Hammond Piper, Home Lodge No. 508 ; Felix 
William Trost, Standard Lodge No. 873; William Bell Van Sandt, 
Hofus No. 253, Cincinnati, Ohio ; William Frederick Ulrich, William B. 
Warren No. 209; Edward Atchison St. John, William B. Warren No. 
209; Delmar Jay Burlingame, LaGrange, 111. No. 770; Henry Marcus 
Thompson, Standard Lodge No. 873 ; Herbert Llewelis Patterson, 
Standard Lodge No. 873 ; Henry William Pacius, William B. Warren 
No. 209, Joseph Henry MacDonald, Ancient Landmarks No. 319, Indian- 
apolis ; Edwin Sawyer Antisdale, William B. Warren No. 209 ; William 
George Haupt, William B. Warren No. 209 ; Herman Charles Kuhnke, 
Willam B. W r arren No. 209; Joseph Albert Sparr, Apollo No. 642; 
Calvin Austin Croninger, Kalamazoo No. 22 ; Clarence Williamson, 
William B. Warren No. 209; William Justin Combs, Brighton Park No. 
854 ; George Arthur Graves, William B. Warren No. 209 ; Roe Hall 
Cover, Pontiac No. 294; Henry Specht, Lakeside No. 739; Gottlieb Er- 
hardt, Lakeside No. 739 ; Julius Yenner, William B. Warren No. 209 ; 
William Alonzo Child, Harvey No. 832; Theodore Christian Klotz, 
William B. Warren No. 209; Peter Debo, St. John Lo. No. 13; 
William Llerbert Woodward, Hillsdale No. 32; Henry Edward Taylor, 
Apollo No. 642; Joshua Robert Higgins Potts, William B. Warren No. 
209 ; Marvin Hale Beach, Wright Grove No. 779 ; Charles Edwin Law- 
son, Humboldt No. 813 ; George Harvey Place, William B. Warren No. 
209; Louis Bader, John B. Sherman No. 880; Leonard Hodges Cobb, 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 129 

Standard No. 873; Verna Roy Day, William B. Warren No. 209; Daniel 
Diederich Schroeder, Charter Oak No. 249, New York; Merl Mayo 
Printz, Newton Lodge No. 216; Charles Edward Potts, William B. 
Warren No. 209; George C. Koep, Richard Cole No. 697; William Mar- 
tin Kratzenberg, Lakeside No. 739 ; Samuel W. Doberer, King David No. 
68, Baltimore, Md. ; Adolf Albert Bernartz, William B. Warren No. 
209; Samuel Per Lee Reese, William B. Warren No. 209; William Wess- 
cott Billings, King Hiram No. 12, Derby, Conn.; Henry Alvin Het- 
rick, Home Lodge No. 508; George William Loderhose, Palisades Local 
No. 478; James Edward Anderson Slater, William B. Warren No. 209; 
Roy Caldwell Hopgood, Morganfield No. 66, Morganfield, Ky. ; Gustav 
Adolph Kirchwehn, Harvard No. 309; Clarence Wilfred Houger, 
Standard No. 873; James Hartick Boye, William B. Warren No. 209; 
Fred Bostick Height, William B. Warren No. 209; Arthur Charles 
Knecht, William B. Warren No. 209; William Sanford Goodell, 
Standard No. 873; Ervin Louis LeGros, Arcana No. 717; Oscar Peter 
Wodock, King Oscar No. 855; Albert Edward Simmon, Mamaro No. 
653, Port Chester, N. Y. ; J. Warren Stinson, Juneau No. 103, New 
Lisbon, Wis.; Daniel Bartholomew Feist, King Oscar No. 855; Rudolph 
Anton Merz, Palisades No. 478 ; Harry James Simpson, Kosmos No. 896 ; 
William Earl Wedlake, Standard No. 873; Otto Ernest Fischer, William 
B. Warren No. 209; Charles William Trayser, William B. Warren No. 
209; Patrick Scanlan, William B. Warren No. 209; Soren Anton Jor- 
gensen, William B. Warren No. 209; William Herman Marien, William 
B. Warren No. 209; Edward Campbell, Hesperia Local No. 411; Oscar 
Christian Johnson, William B. Warren No. 209; Frederick Justus 
Plaettner, William B. Warren No. 209; Frank Knoll, Palace No. 765; 
William Christopher Metcalf, Garden City No. 141; Charles Conrad 
Pacius, Arcana No. 717 ; John Henry Harper, William B. Warren No. 
209; Louis William Grupe, William B. Warren No. 209; Joseph James 
Prusho, Lakeside No. 739 ; George Frank Dahlman, Columbian No. 819 ; 
Alfred August Ciha, Arcana No. 717 ; Wirt Dexter Addy, Kensington 
No. 804; James Andrew Marshall, Kilwining No. 149, Plymouth, Ind. ; 
Eldon J. Hughes, Argus No. 399, Argus, Ind.; Frank L. Rissling, 
William B. Warren No. 209 ; John Alexander Cochrane, Kansas City 
No. 220, Kansas City, Mo.; Charles William Wright, Sabina No. 324, 
Sabina, Ohio ; George Alfred Greaves, LaGrange No. 770 ; George Al- 
byn Donnelly, St. James No. 74, St. Augusta, Ont. ; Henry John Appel, 
William B. Warren No. 209; William Murray, William B. Warren No. 
209 ; Fred William Leuthesser, William B. Warren No. 209 ; Will Martin 
Hills, Park Manor No. 899; Harry Flint, South Park No. 662; John 
Archibald Watson, Pomona No. 281, Michigan; Oscar Frederick Malm- 
berg, William B. Warren No. 209; William Manning Hopkins, William 



130 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

B. Warren No. 209 ; Ulysses Grant Hinman, Charleston Lodge No. 35 ; 
Jens Christian Peterson, William B. Warren No. 209 ; Leo Eugene T. 
Fick, William B. Warren No. 209 ; Charles Frederick Osborne, William 
B. Warren No. 209; Richard Montgomery Stuart, William B. Warren 
No. 209; Louis Kellan, William B. Warren No. 209; Clellie Todd Plum- 
ber, Mount Horbre No. 333, Fredericksburg, La. ; John Stephen Hara- 
jian, Mystic Star No. 758; Ardnous Edwin Baker, Austin No. 850; 
James Wyman Roach, Welcome Lodge U.D. ; Arthur Charles John 
Louis Moeller, Welcome Lodge U.D. ; Anthony Augustus O'Neill, 
Standard No. 873 ; James Leckie Fulton, Standard No. 873 ; Alvin 
Hepler Kachel, America No. 889 ; James Jacob Debo, Welcome Lodge 
U.D. ; Herman Larson, Standard No. 873 ; Percival Herbert Smith, 
Mizpah No. 768; John Joseph Schulgen, Hesperia No. 411; Gailon 
Harry Stinson, Warner Lodge No. 50, Jeffersonville, Vermont; Charles 
Brinkmann, William B. Warren No. 209; Henry George Redick, Park 
Lodge No. 843 ; Casper Gerhardt Lude, William B. Warren No. 209 ; 
Samuel Jerome Wilcox, Mystic Star NcV. 758 ; Arthur Lewis Malow, 
Standard No. 873. 

The record of this lodge is very full and complete, and it gives your 
committee pleasure to recommend that a charter be granted to this 
lodge as Welcome Lodge No. 916. 

Concord Lodge, U.D., Chicago, Illinois. 

A dispensation for this lodge was issued June 25, 1909, by M.W. 
Grand Master Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted July 1, 
1909, by R.W. Bro. Harry W. Harvey, D.D.G.M., of the First District. 

The work of the lodge is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 21 

Number elected • • 16 

Number rej ected 

Number not acted on 5 

Number initiated 12 

Number passed 10 

Number raised • • 10 

Number named in dispensation signing for charter 25 

Number not signing for charter ■ 6 

Number signing petition for charter 29 

Whose names are as follows : 

William Furman Moore, William Gaston Aller, Charles Benjamin 
Walters, Francis Bernier Laramie, Charles Gohl, Benjamin Walter 
Fogg, Henry Madson, Jacob J. Englehart, Charles A. Spetz, Oscar 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 131 

Theodore Spetz, Frank Moore, Roscoe Crum Clark, John H. Davis, 
Martin Larsen, John Deforest Tower, Ira Setter Gillan, Adolph R. 
Brandt, Robert Hartney, Ralph Sheridan Rowley, Benjamin William 
Carson, Zephere Guy Tatro, Alonzo Marshall Hoopes, Anson Boyd 
Timmons, D. Webb Jones, Matthew Nick Funk, Gustav Charles Seyber- 
lich, George Eby Carr, Albert Orlando Scholes, George Orlie Marlatt. 

The record of this lodge has been kept in a very clear and satis- 
tory manner, giving the full information necessary and showing the 
work to have been well done. Your committee recommend that a 
charter be granted to this lodge as Concord Lodge No. 917. 

Cottonwood Lodge, U.D., Cottonwood, Illinois. 

A dispensation was issued April 9, 1909, by M.W. Grand Master 
Alexander H. Bell. The lodge was instituted April 16, 1909, by R.W. 
Bro. I. A. Foster, D.D.G.M., of the Forty-seventh District. 

The record of work is as follows : 

Number of petitions received 6 

Number elected 5 

Number rejected 1 

Number initiated 5 

Number passed • • 5 

Number raised 5 

Number named in dispensation not signing for charter 1 

Number signing petition for charter 19 

Whose names are as follows : 

George Nelson Harris, Daniel Arthur Bryant, Edgar M. Lasater, 
James Blazor Bryant, William Edward McGuire, Charles Bayley Wil- 
liams, James B. Hale, William Winder Williams, William C. Williams, 
Rank Logan Pearce, James S. Pearce, William Franklin Lanham, James 
M. Lasater, Walter Bennett Weas, Grover Bagby, Henry Oral Smith, 
Elvis Mercer Smith, Lee Mills, Ulysses Grant Melton. 

This lodge failed to comply with Section 12, Article 23, Part Two 
of the Grand Lodge By-laws, which clearly states that "Every lodge 
under dispensation shall make its returns to the Grand Lodge on or 
before the first day of September next succeeding the date of its dis- 
pensation, and shall transmit therewith its letter of dispensation, a copy 
of its by-laws, and a record of its proceedings." 

Their failure to comply with section 12, Article 23 of the Grand 
Lodge By-Laws by sending only a copy of their record, which was in 



132 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

no way certified to, makes its obligatory on the part of your committee 
to recommend that a charter be withheld, and that their dispensaion 
be continued until the next session of the Grand Lodge. 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge, it is with a commendable degree of 
pride that we come to you to report the degree of progress made by the 
craft of Illinois working under dispensations, and to be able to say 
that the work for the past year has in the main been done in a very 
satisfactory manner, and that the lodges U.D. that are being born into 
this Grand Lodge are vastly superior to those of a few years ago. 

Your committee have found it necessary at this time to reject only 
four of the lodges applying for a charter, but we can say for those 
rejected, that a few years ago three of them would have been accepted 
without question. But as we have so often said to you, that we be- 
lieve in progress, and that we are setting higher each year, the standard 
of Freemasonry in Illinois. We do not want to be like the bird who 
builds her nest the first time as well as she ever does. We are intel- 
lectual beings, and capable of growth. 

Brethren, you know the old adage teaches us, that there is no ex- 
cellence without labor, and our progress in Masonry will be commen- 
surate with the amount of labor we put into it. The flower that 
grows wild by the roadside is beautiful, but when nurtured and culti- 
vated by the skilled hand of the gardener, it becomes a thing of ex- 
ceeding beauty. The diamond when dug from the bowels of the Earth 
is only an ordinary looking stone, that anyone not familiar with it in 
its crude state, might throw away, but when it comes from the hand 
of the polisher, it is a thing of rare beauty. Some one has said there 
is an angel in every piece of white marble, and that it only needs the 
touch of the sculptor's hand to fashion it. 

So it is with Freemasonry, if we would develop its beauties we 
must put into it a high degree of excellence and labor. Brethren, it is 
only possible for us to set for you, high ideals ; but it remains for you 
to bring the work to that high standard. 

H. C. Mitchell, 
I. H. Todd, 
John Johnston, 
M. B. Iott, 
J. W. Hamilton, 

Committee. 

The report was adopted. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 133 

» 
EEPOET— Committee on Finance. 

Bro. S. O. Spring- presented the report of the Committee 
on Finance. 

To the M.W. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of the State of Illinois: 
Your Finance Committee fraternally reports that it has examined 
the books and accounts of the R.W. Grand Secretary and R.W. Grand 
Treasurer and find the same to have been kept in a systematic, ac- 
curate and comprehensive manner ; that all moneys due the M.W. 
Grand Lodge have been received, properly entered of record and duly 
paid over to the R.W. Grand Treasurer as provided by law ; that the 
R.W. Grand Treasurer has fully accounted for all the funds and 
property for which he is responsible; that the reports submitted to this 
annual communication of the M.W, Grand Lodge by these officers, re- 
spectively, are a true exhibit of their official transactions during the 
past year; that the cash balances as reported are on deposit in the 
State Bank of Chicago, and the securities as reported have been in- 
spected and found to be in conformity with the report of the R.W. 
Grand Treasurer in every particular. 

Your Committee desire to express their approval of the manner 
in which the duties of the R.W. Grand Treasurer and R.W. Grand 
Secretary have been performed, and the perfect condition in which 
their books and accounts are kept, entitling them to the fraternal con- 
sideration of their brethren of this jurisdiction. 

A synopsis of the financial condition of the M.W. Grand Lodge is 
shown by the following condensed exhibit taken from the report of the 
R.W. Grand Treasurer : 

General Fund. 

Cash Balance October 5, 190S $43,779.30 

Cash received from R.W. Grand Secretary 56.445.40 

Total • $100,224.70 

Credit by mileage and per diem orders $19,704.10 

Credit by salaries Grand Officers 4.900.00 

Credit by miscellaneous orders 22,023.16 

Cash balance to credit General Fund 53,597.44 

Total $100,221.70 



13 1- Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Charity Fund. 

Cash balance October 5, 1908 $ 31,396.72 

Cash received from R.W. Grand Secretary 38,036.64 

Total $69,433.36 

Credit by orders paid since last report $37,924.59 

Cash balance to credit Charity Fund 31,508.77 

$69,433.36 

Masonic Orphan Home Fund. 

Cash balance October 5th, 1908 $ 10,504.77 

Cash received from R.W. Grand Secretary 14,028.00 

Total $24,532.77 

Credit by vouchers paid since last report $2,224.54 

Cash balance to credit of 111. Masonic Orphan Home 

Fund 22,308.23 

Total $24,532.77 

Home for the Aged Fund. 

Cash balance, October 5, 1908 . .$ 2,773.44 

Cash received from R.W. Grand Secretary 420.00 

Total $ 3,193.44 

Credit by vouchers paid since last report $ 2,041.82 

Cash balance to credit of Masonic Orphans' Home 

Fund 1,151.62 

$3,193.44 

Masonic Home Fund. 

Cash balance, October 5, 1908 $204.55 

Cash received from R.W. Grand Secretary 60.65 

$265.20 

CREDIT. 

No vouchers paid during year. 

Cash balance to credit Masonic Home Fund $265.20 

Your Committee find the par value of investment securities in the 
several funds to be as follows at this date : 

In Charity Fund $11,800.00 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home Fund 82,500.00 

In Illinois Home for Aged Fund 10,500.00 

In Illinois Masonic Home Fund 1,000.00 

$105,800.00 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 135 



Summary. 

Bonds and securities on hand all funds $105,800.00 

Cash on hand all funds 108,831.26 



Total assets in Treasury $214,631.26 

Your Committee finds that the Board of Trustees in charge of the 
Masonic Homes holds an unexpended cash balance from appropriation 
made for the maintenace of the Illinois Masonic Home at Sullivan of 
Eighty-Nine and 71/100 Dollars ($89.71), also an unexpended cash bal- 
ance of $280.97, from an appropriation made for the maintenance of the 
Masonic Orphans' Home, which balances, we recommend be returned 
to the Treasury of the Grand Lodge and placed to the credit of the 
Charity Fund from which they were drawn. 

For the maintenance and support of the Illinois Masonic Orphans' 
Home at Chicago during the coming year, your Committee recommends 
an appropriation be made from the Charity Fund of $12,000, and for the 
maintenance and support of the Illinois Masonic Home at Sullivan dur- 
ing the coming year that an appropriation be made from the Charity 
Fund of $24,000, said amounts to be paid to said Board of Trustees in 
equal semi-annual installments beginning October 15, 1909, itemized re- 
ports of the disbursements thereof to be submitted to the M.W. Grand 
Lodge at its next annual communication. 

We also recommend that the Board of Trustees of the Illinois Ma- 
sonic Homes be authorized to proceed with the erection of a permanent 
fire-proof building, for the use of a Masonic Orphans' Home, to be lo- 
cated on the site recently acquired for that purpose at LaGrange, Illi- 
nois, at a cost not to exceed One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000). 

Your Committee further recommend that an appropriation of $75,000 
be made from the funds in the Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home Fund, 
and the Home for the Aged Fund, which are in excess of $57,000, be- 
ing the amounts reserved by deeds of trust, and the balance of the 
$75,000 from the unappropriated funds in the Charity and General Funds 
— such appropriation to be paid in amounts of not over $10,000 each, 
which may become necessary and as the work progresses. 

Your Committee recommends a continuance of the appropriation 
each month of $150 from the Charity Fund in payment of the rental of 
oremises in Chicago temporarily occupied by tne Masonic Orphans' 
Home. 

Your Committee also recommends that for the ensuing year the 
Board of Trustees of the Masonic Homes be authorized to expend the 
annual rental of the farm, consisting of 224 acres, at Sullivan, amount- 



138 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

emanate from the proper authorities and recommend that no stone be 
laid unless the authorities are willing to have the inscription thereon 
show that it was laid by the Masonic fraternity, and the date upon 
which it was laid and that no corner-stone be laid with Masonic cere- 
monies without such inscription. We do not regard the name of the 
person officiating as an essential part of such inscription. 

The Liquor Question. 

Masonic discipline deals with individuals and takes cognizance of 
infractions of civil and moral law on the part of its members ; it does 
not legislate for classes or vocations. We think there can be no ques- 
tion as to the soundness of the decision of the M.W. Grand Master in 
holding the by-law of Clinton Lodge No. 19, in so far as it related to 
the sale of liquor, wholly void. 

A constituent lodge cannot, in the judgment of your Committee, by 
legislation make that unlawful which is neither unlawful nor unmasonic 
under the laws of the state or the laws of this Grand Lodge. 

"How to Vote on a Motion to Suspend." 

In discussing the question of "How to Vote on a Motion to Sus- 
pend," the Grand Master reaches the conclusion that although the vote 
is taken in a manner contrary to the law, the verdict should stand, if 
the facts warrant the suspension, and no one present objects. 

We think that this decision tends to lessen a strict obedience to the 
written law and for that reason we do not approve of it. 

We would not exalt the letter over the spirit of the law, but we 
believe that when the letter as well as the spirit can be carried out, 
both should be observed, and that the more rigidly the letter of the 
law is enforced the sooner its spirit will be understood and the more 
rapidly the ignorance of the law of which the Grand Master so fully 
and justly complains, will disappear. 

We are of the opinion that when a sentence of suspension for non- 
payment of dues has been reached by a vote taken in a mariner con- 
trary to law, and the Grand Master's attention is called to the irregu- 
larity within ninety days, he should instruct the Master of the lodge to 
declare the action, suspending the accused, illegal and direct the Master 
to have the vote taken in accordance with law. 

The Philadelphia Conference. 

While this Committee is able to "agree as to some of the recom- 
mendations of the conference and might be able to agree as to all of 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 139 

them, it feels that the matters are so important and the subject so large 
that we cannot give it the consideration it should receive in time to 
report at this session. The drafting of several amendments is likely to be 
involved and the committee that disposes of this subject should be able 
to deal with it with due deliberation. We therefore ask that this item 
be left with the Jurisprudence Committee to be reported upon by it at 
the next session of this Grand Lodge. 

Edward Cook, 
Wm. B. Wright, 
C. E. Allen, 
H. A. Snell, 

Committee. 

Brother Cook moved that the report of the Jurisprudence 
Committee be adopted. 

An amendment was offered that all that was said in the 
Grand Master's report touching the question "How to vote 
on a motion to suspend" be substituted for the report of the 
Committee, as expressing the views of the Grand Lodge on 
this question. 

The amendment was adopted unanimously. 

The report as amended was then adopted. 

KEPOKT— Committee on Correspondence. 
The Committee on Correspondence presented the follow- 
ing report on the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Holland. 

To the M.W. Grand Lodge of Illinois, A.F. and A.M.: 

Your Committee on Correspondence to whom was referred the fol- 
lowing resolution, viz. : 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Illinois formally recognize the 
Grand Lodge of Holland (Groot Oosten der Netherlander) and request 
an exchange of representatives, thus aiding to preserve and strengthen 
the fraternal relations between those grand bodies. 

Having had the same under consideration, would fraternally report, 
that in view of the fact that on a former occasion this Committee re- 
ported that the Grand Orient of the Netherlands (Groot Oosten der 
Nederlander) and the Grand Lodge of Holland are two expressions for 
one and the same thing, and that this, body has no features allying it 



140 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

with the Grand Orient system except the name, and in view of the fur- 
ther fact that by action already taken by this Grand Lodge its constitu- 
ent lodges are permitted to admit visiting brethren hailing from lodges 
holding allegiance to the Grand Lodge of Holland, after satisfying 
themselves of the visitors' individual qualifications, and in view of the 
still further fact that we have the authority of Robert Freke Gould's 
History of Freemasonry for the statement that the lodges which consti- 
tute the Grand Lodge of Holland are descended from the Grand Lodges 
of the British Isles and have not allied themselves with any of the ir- 
regular Orients we are of the opinion that the Grand Lodge of Illinois 
may consistently with its previous record recognize the Grand Lodge of 
Holland, and we therefore recommend the adoption of the following, 
viz. : 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Illinois, A.F. and A.M., regards 
the Grand Lodge of Holland (Groot Oosten der Nederlander) as a 
regular and sovereign body of A.F. and A.M. and believes that our 
Grand Master may at his discretion properly enter into correspondence 
and an exchange of representatives therewith. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Edward Cook, Committee. 
Chicago, Oct. 12, 1909. 

The report was adopted. 

REPORT— Committee on Obituaries. 
The Committee on Obituaries, through its Chairman, 
R.W. Bro. C. H. Thompson, presented the report of that 
Committee. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., of Illinois: 

Another mile stone in the journey of life is passed, and as we 
pause for a brief period to pay loving tribute to the memory of our 
brothers who have been ushered through the "Gates of Pearl," let us 
take to ourselves the lessons learned from their lives, and take heed 
lest we fail to pass the Master's Square when our work on earth is 
ended. 

We are met, in full possession of all the attributes of vigorous man- 
hood, and apparently unmindful that the morrow may bring us the 
summons "to join the innumerable caravan that moves to that mysteri- 
ous realm." Let us remember that the uncertainty of death is only as 
to time. Let us not be unmindful of our obligations to our fellowmen 
and in all things, act upon the square. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 141 

Let us be faithful in the discharge of our duties to God, our neigh- 
bor and ourselves, so that in age, when the sun of our life is sinking 
behind the mists that betoken an endless night, we can lay aside the 
burdens of life in the full consciousness that our duty has been done. 

Let us who survive these, our well beloved brethren, be more closely 
bound in the ties of fraternal union and friendship, and in the short space 
allotted to us wisely and usefully employ our time, for 

"To our faith and hope is given, 

When Time and Death itself shall die, 
A brighter world, a purer heaven — 

Not yet revealed to mortal eye. 
Thither with all our hopes ascending, 

May every thought and act be tending." 

FOREIGN GRAND JURISDICTIONS. 

From sixteen Foreign Grand Jurisdictions are reported twenty Past 
Grand Officers who have harkened to the call of Father Time. 

Francis Marion Zuck, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Arizona, laid down the burdens of life June 16, 1909. Brother Zuck 
was born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, July 21, 1838. Removed to Iowa 
in 1850, where he remained until twenty years of age, when he removed 
to Wayne county, Indiana, engaging in the merchandising business. At 
the beginning of the Civil War he returned to Iowa, enlisting in the 
3rd Iowa Volunteer's, serving until late in 1863, when he was honorably 
discharged. In 1882, with his family he removed to Holbrook, Arizona, 
where he resided until his death. 

In 1889 he was elected Junior Grand Warden, and in 1902, Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Arizona. At the time of his death he 
was Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas near the 
Grand Lodge of Arizona. 

James W. Null, Grand Tyler of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, 
died at his home in Little Rock, Ark., August 3, 1909. Brother Null was 
born in Noble county, Ohio, November 6, 1865, was made a Mason in 
Naval Lodge No. 4, District of Columbia, and upon his removal to 
Little Rock, affiliated with Western Star Lodge No. 2. He was ap- 
pointed Grand Tyler in 1907. 

Melvin Edwards, Grand Lecturer of the Grand Lodge of Colorado, 
received the summons of the Grim Reaper, August 4, 1909. He was born 
in Erie, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1S50. At the age of twenty-four he 
removed to Colorado, and when, in 1876 Colorado was admitted to the 
Union as a state, became prominently identified with politics, serving 
one term in the legislature, and two terms as Secretary of State. 



142 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Brother Edwards was made a Mason in Denver Lodge No. 5, May 5, 
1891, was Grand Marshal of the Grand Lodge 1905-06, Grand Orator in 
1907, and was appointed Grand Lecturer September 22, 1908. 

Henry Orange Warner, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Connecticut, left this earthly tabernacle May 8, 1909. Brother Warner 
was made a Mason April 18, 1865, passed through the various chairs of 
his lodge, and was elected its Master, December 20, 1870, serving in that 
capacity for five years. He was elected Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge in 1894 and again in , 1895, serving with great distinction. The 
Masonic Home, in which he was greatly interested was dedicated during 
his second term, and he was elected its vice-president. As a citizen he 
was respected and honored, and was ever faithful in the discharge of 
his duties. 

James Lewis Gould, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Connecticut, passed from this earthly to the Celestial Grand Lodge, 
January 26, 1909. Brother Gould was raised to the sublime degree De- 
cember 31, 1851, in St. John's Lodge No. 3, of Bridgeport, Conn., and 
throughout his long career as a Mason was loyal and active. He became 
Junior Grand Deacon of the Grand Lodge in 1865, was advanced through 
the various stations, and elected Grand Master in 1871. He was a grad- 
uate of Yale law school in the famous class of 1853, but for many years 
his time was devoted to newspaper work, and as a writer on Masonic 
subjects. 

William E. Anderson, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Florida, died at his home in Pensacola, Florida, November 12, 1908, at 
the age of seventy-five years. Brother Anderson was made a Mason 
in Talladega Lodge No. 261, later affiliating with Escambia Lodge No. 
15, of which he was Master from 1867 to 1877, and again in 1891. In 
1881 he was elected to the exalted position of Grand Master, serving two 
years. His Masonic service was long, useful, and marked for its activi- 
ties, energy and wisdom. He lived an exemplary life, full of loving 
and gentle personality and will be sadly missed by all who knew him. 

Simeon Stevens Johnson, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge 
of Indiana, was called to his final reward January 19, 1909. Brother 
Johnson was born in Athens, Vermont, July 27, 1836, removed to Jeffer- 
sonville, Ind., in 1856, where he prepared himself for admission to the 
bar. He was made a Master Mason in Clark Lodge No. 40 in 1866, and 
was its Worshipful Master for ten years, and for a great number of 
years prior to his death, was its secretary. In 1898 he was elected Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge. The Masonic order of Indiana compli- 
ments itself that it has so generously awarded him its honors, for he 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 143 

won them by his skill and loyalty, and he honored them with his devo- 
tion to the craft and his dignity and worth as a man and a Mason. 

Rufus Easton Anderson, Senior Past Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Missouri, died in Palmyra, July 27, 1909. Brother Anderson 
had made his mark as a distinguished jurist and brilliant orator, and 
took an active part in the affairs of the state where he was born, lived 
and died. He was made a Mason in Palmyra Lodge No. 13, in 1859, 
served as its Worshipful Master in 1862, was appointed Grand Orator 
in 1863 and 1864, was elected Junior Grand Warden in 1865-6, passed 
through the various offices to the exalted position of Grand Master, to 
which he was elected in 1873. For the past five years he was chairman 
of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence. As one of the most 
brilliant writers and forceful orators in Masonic bodies, he ever hewed 
to the line of his own convictions of right. 

Joseph J. Couch, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New 
York, departed this life February 10, 1909, after an active Masonic ca- 
reer of nearly fifty years. Brother Couch was raised to the sublime 
degree of Master Mason in Joppa Lodge No. 201, in 1859, served as its 
Master five years, was elected a Commissioner of Appeals in 1876, and 
Grand Master in 1877. He was of unquestioned ability, unsullied integ- 
rity, pure in thought, word and deed. It may well stand as the crown- 
ing glory of his life, that, while widely known and greatly honored 
abroad, he was most loved and venerated at home. 

Bradner D. Slaughter, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Nebraska, was called from his labors on earth to eternal refreshment in 
the paradise of God, May 8, 1909. He was born November 17, 1844, in 
Wayne county, New York. Brother Slaughter was made a Mason in 
Capitol Lodge No. 3, Omaha in 1882, and became a charter member of 
Cedar River Lodge No. 89, Fullerton, Nebraska, of which lodge he was 
a member at the time of his death. He served as Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge from June 19, 1891, to June 17, 1892. He was faithful in 
the discharge of his duties to God, his country, his family, his neighbor 
and himself. 

Henry Brown, Past Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Nebraska, passed away April 4, 1909. Brother Brown was born No- 
vember 24, 1824, near Goshen, Ohio. Was made a Mason February 15, 
1851, in Lebanon Lodge, Lebanon, Ohio. He was elected Deputy Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, June 14, 1859, serving one 
year. His life was full of good thoughts, words and deeds. He was an 
ardent and faithful Mason and a Christian gentleman. 

Whltam Burr Childers, the Senior Past Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of New Mexico, died March 3, 1908. He was born in 



144 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Pulaski, Tennessee, March 20, 1854, was educated in Washington and 
Lee University, Lexington, Va., from which he graduated with honor. 
He located in Albuquerque N. M., becoming a prominent member of the 
bar, and closely identified with the interests of the community in which 
he lived. Brother Childers was made a Mason in Occidental Lodge No. 
163, St. Louis, Mo., dimitting to become a charter member of Temple 
Lodge No. 6, at Albuquerque, and was its first Worshipful Master. In 
1882 he was elected Junior Grand Warden, and Grand Master in 1883, 
fulfilling the duties of these offices to the fullest satisfaction of his 
brethren. 

Elias Elwell Day, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New 
Mexico, passed away May 31, 1908. Brother Day was born in Glou- 
cester, Mass., March 25, 1863. His Masonic career was brilliant. He 
was made a Master Mason in 1892, elected Worshipful Master in 1894- 
5-6, was elected Junior Grand Warden in 1896, Senior Grand Warden 
in 1897, Deputy Grand Master in 1898, and Grand Master in 1899. He 
was associated with every active interest ; enterprises large and small- 
social, educational and political, and was always in the midst of things 
giving his best thought to the welfare of his adopted home. New Mex- 
ico loses a man whose distinguishing traits have left their indelible 
mark. 

Fabius Haywood Busbee, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge 
of North Carolina, died in the city of Seattle, Washington, away from 
home and loved ones, August 28, 1908, where he had gone to attend a 
meeting of the American Bar Associaton. While still a mere boy he 
left college to enlist in the Confederate service, serving until the end 
of the war, after which, he resumed his studies at the University, from 
which he graduated with highest honors. Brother Busbee was made a 
Mason in 1871, becoming deeply interested in Masonic work and was 
called upon to fill important stations in his lodge. His zeal for the 
welfare of the order was recognized by the Grand Lodge, and he was 
elected to the office of Grand Master in 1885 and 1886. For several years 
before his death he was chairman of the Committee on Masonic Juris- 
prudence. He was in love with life and deeply interested in all that tends 
to a noble manhood, ever ready to join any movement for the material 
progress of his community and the betterment of humanity. 

William Moore Cunningham, Past Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Ohio, departed this life August 16, 1909. Brother Cunningham 
was the oldest Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, of which he 
had been an active and distinguished member for over fifty years. He 
was raised to the sublime degree May 25, 1850, was Worshipful Master 
of Newark Lodge No. 97 in 1859-60, Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 145 

in 1874, Deputy Grand Master in 1875-76, and Grand Master in 1877 
and 187S. He was appointed chairman of the Committee on Foreign 
Correspondence in 1885, holding the position continuously until his death. 
He was one of the best known writers on Masonic subjects in the world, 
and as such was a recognized authority. His death will prove a distinct 
loss to that band of devoted writers who are laboring to unify the system 
of Masonry in all countries where our institution exists. In his every 
day life he was genial and cordial, pleasant and considerate, and thought- 
ful of the happiness of others. 

Jacob Mayer, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Oregon, 
laid down the burdens of life December 31, 1908. He was born in Ger- 
many May 7, 1826, came to America in 1842, locating for a time in New 
Orleans. In 1850 he removed to San Francisco, where he received the 
Master Masons degree, and served as Worshipful Master of La Parfaite 
Lodge No. 17. After his removal to Portland, he affiliated with Wil- 
liamette Lodge No. 2. Brother Mayer was elected Grand Treasurer in 
1881, serving four years, and in 1888 was elected Grand Master, serving 
the Grand Lodge with marked ability. 

John Charles Davis, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Wyoming, was killed in a wreck near Dotsero, Colorado, January 15, 
1909. Brother Davis was born in Ireland, March 14, 1852, came to this 
country at an early age, locating at Rawlins, Wyoming, where he became 
associated with the Hugus & Company Stores and Banking Association, 
of which he was head and general manager at the time of his death. He 
was made a Master Mason in Rawlins Lodge No. 5. He was elected 
Grand Master in 1892, in which office he served with distinction. 

John S. Taylor, Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Wyoming, died in office, December 21, 1908. He was born in England 
in 1870, and came to America in 1888, locating in Nebraska, where he re- 
mained four years. In 1892 he removed to Wyoming, locating in Sher- 
idan, of which city he was mayor at the time of his death. Brother Tay- 
lor was made a Mason in Sheridan Lodge No. 8, March 11, 1S98, and 
was elected Deputy Grand Master in September of last year. He had 
attended a meeting of the Consistory in Cheyenne but a few days be- 
fore his death, returning to his home with reason dethroned, and wan- 
dered through snow and ice to a field outside the city where his lifeless 
body was found three days later. He had been so closely identified witii 
the growth of his city and its institutions, that he will be sadly missed. 

George of Joannovics, the Venerable Grand Master of the Symbolic 
Grand Lodge of Hungary, entered into eternal rest January 10, 1909, 
after forty-two years of active Masonic service. We regret that details 
of his life as a man and a Mason are not available for this report. 



146 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Edmund Prestos McQueen, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge 
of Tennessee, died August 14, 1909, in the fifty-ninth year of his age. 
Brother McQueen was a native of Georgia; removed to Tennessee in 
early youth, and was educated at Newport, Loudon, and the University 
of Tennessee, at Knoxville. He was a lawyer by profession, and was 
actively engaged in practice until failing health compelled his retire- 
ment. He was made a Master Mason in Tennessee Lodge No. 204, at 
Loudon, Tenn., January 6, 1873. In 1889 he was elected Worshipful 
Master, and in 1903 was elected M.W. Grand Master. His careful, en- 
ergetic and able work as Grand Master, his entire life of love and de- 
votion to duty, his record as a Christian gentleman and as a Mason, 
stand in lasting witness that the unanimous expression of confidence and 
esteem by his Masonic brethren was an honor well deserved. 

ILLINOIS. 

In our own jurisdiction, sad havoc has been wrought by the "all- 
devouring scythe of time," and many of our brethren have 

"Passed beyond the mists that bind us here." 

Loyal Levi Munn, Past Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of 
Illinois, passed away at his home in Freeport,- Illinois, November 23, 

1908, aged seventy-nine years. Brother Munn was born in the state of 
New York, September 1, 1829, came to Freeport June 6, 1846, where he 
continuously resided until his death. He was raised to the sublime de- 
gree of Master Mason in Excelsior Lodge No. 97, October 27, 1853; 
was a charter member of Moses R. Thompson Lodge No. 381, which 
afterwards consolidated with Excelsior Lodge No. 97, in which he served 
as Worshipful Master for several years. In 1881 Brother Munn was 
elected Grand Secretary, serving for twelve years. His strong person- 
ality and his cheerful disposition won for him the friendship of all 
with whom he came in contact. We may well emulate the example of 
his noble life, his unfeigned piety to God, and his inflexible fidelity to 
every trust. 

Joseph Robbins, Past Grand Master, and for more than forty-five 
years a conspicuous figure in this Grand Lodge, passed through the por- 
tals of the Celestial Grand Lodge into immortal life and light July 19, 

1909, after an illness of many months' duration which was borne with 
that fortitude and sturdiness which characterized his long and useful 
life. Brother Robbins was born in Leominster, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 12, 1834, of parent which were descended from that band of sturdy 
pilgrims which landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620. He attended school 
in Melrose, Mass., until the age of sixteen, when he learned the trade 




LOYAL L. MUNN 
K. W. Grand Secretary 1881-1902 



1909.) • Grand Lodge of Illinois. 147 

of house-painting. In 1858 he came to Quincy, Illinois, to study medi- 
cine in the office of an uncle, remaining one year. In 1859, he went to 
Philadelphia, and entered Jefferson Medical College, graduating there- 
from in 1861, when he returned to Quincy and began the active practice 
of medicine, in which profession he was deeply interested and became 
very prominent. He was active in the city, county, and state medical 
societies, and stood high in the councils of the American Medical So- 
ciety, a national organization. For many years he was a member of the 
Quincy Board of Education and a director of the Quincy Free Public 
Library, giving largely of his time and energy to their welfare. He was 
active in politics, and was a leader in county, congressional and state 
conventions. In all things he was thoroughly and genuinely on the 
square. No word or deed of his was ever of such a character as to 
raise any semblance of doubt regarding his motives or intentions. He 
harbored no ill will toward anyone, carried no grudges, but, after 
standing firmly and fearlessly for what he considered right, always ac- 
cepted the verdict of the majority, whether favorable or unfavorable 
to him, in a graceful and modest manner. His friends were legion. Of 
enemies, he had none. That he was deeply interested in the material and 
moral welfare of his fellowmen, his daily life bears indelible record. 
As a Mason, he achieved rare distinction ; made a Master Mason in 
Wyoming Lodge, Melrose, Massachusetts, from which he dimitted and 
affiliated with Quincy Lodge No. 296, December 6, 1859, was elected 
its Worshipful Master in 1863, serving seven consecutive years, and was 
again elected to the office in 1880. In 1868 he served this Grand Lodge 
as Grand Orator; in 1870, as chairman of the Committee on Obitu- 
aries ; was elected Deputy Grand Master and served as acting Grand 
Master in 1875, and was elected Most Worshipful Grand Master in 
1876 and 1877. He was chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence 
from 1878 to 1888, and from then until the date of his death was the 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence. In this capacity he attained 
great prominence, being recognized as the greatest authority on Masonic 
subjects in the world. That he was fully appreciated, and loved for his 
distinct worth as a man and a Mason, not only at home, but in foreign 
lands as well, is evidenced by an article in the Freemason, an English 
publication, which was written by Brother R. J. Gould, an eminent writer 
on Masonic subjects, who says of Brother Robbins : "I am not writing 
today to extol the abilities of a great Freemason who stands in no 
need of my own or of any other man's panegyric. His writings will live 
and will form an abiding claim to the recognition of his merits as a 
teacher of the craft. The object I have most at heart, in these hasty 
lines, is to mourn the loss of a dear and valued friend." Our Grand 
Master has truly said, "Words cannot magnify his worth." 



148 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Brother Robbins' remains were laid at rest in Woodland cemetery, 
in Qtiincy, Wednesday, July 21, the funeral being attended by nearly all 
the Grand Lodge officers, and a very large number of Masons from 
Quincy, and other parts of the state. The services at the grave were 
conducted by the Grand Lodge, M.W. Grand Master Alexander H. Bell, 
officiating. 

" 'Tis done, the dark decree is said 

That called our friend away; 
Submissive bow the sorrowing head, 

And bend the lowly knee; 
We will not ask why God has broke 

Our pillar on its stone, 
But humbly yield us to the stroke, 

And say 'His will be done.' " 

Calendar Rohrbough, Grand Steward of the Grand Lodge of Illi- 
nois, died at his home in Kinmundy, Illinois, September 11, 1909, at the 
age of seventy-five years. Brother Rohrbough was born in Buchanan, 
West Virginia, September 1, 1834. In 1857, he came to Illinois, locating 
in Hancock county, teaching school until 1860, when he engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. In 1862 he closed out his business and organized a 
company of volunteer infantry, with which he was mustered into the 
service of his country as second Lieutenant, and the following year 
he was twice promoted, the second time, to Captain. At the close of the 
war he returned to Illinois, settling in Kinmundy, where his life's work 
was carried on. In all things making for the welfare of the church, 
the community, and the uplifting of humanity, he was a leader. His 
daily life was an example worthy of emulation. Kind, courteous, jo- 
vial, loving and considerate ; a gentleman always. The Christian char- 
acter which he builded will stand as a conspicuous and enduring monu- 
ment to his memory. Brother Rohrbough was raised to the sublime 
degree of Master Mason in Kinmundy Lodge No. 398, October 21, 1867. 
He served as Worshipful Master from 1887 to 1894 inclusive, and was 
again elected to the position in 1898, serving three years. In 1903 he 
was appointed Grand Steward, which position he held at the time of his 
death. His funeral was held Tuesday, September 14. The services at 
the grave were conducted by Kinmundy Lodge No. 398, R.W. Bro. Al- 
bert B. Ashley, Deputy Grand Master, coming from his summer home 
in Michigan to officiate as Master of that lodge on this occasion. 

Richmond S. Dement, Grand Orator of this Grand Lodge in 1877, 
was laid to rest October 13, 1908, with Masonic honors, the services be- 
ing in charge of R.W. Bro. A. H. Scrogin. Brother Dement was made 
a Master Mason in Lexington Lodge No. 482, in 1870, and served as its 
Worshipful Master in 1881. In 1885 he dimitted therefrom and removed 
to Chicago. He served as surveyor general in Utah Territory during the 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 149 

administration of President Cleveland. Brother Dement was a Ma- 
sonic author of note. 

Hiram Washington Thomas, Past Grand Chaplain of the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois, died at De Funiak Springs, Florida, August 12, 1909, 
aged seventy-seven years. Brother Thomas affiliated with Thomas J. 
Turner Lodge No. 409, December 16, 1875. In 1893 he was appointed 
Grand Chaplain and was re-appointed in 1894. He also served as Grand 
Chaplain at three other communications. He was a minister of the 
Gospel, and preached and practiced the tenets of Freemasonry. He was 
greatly interested in Masonry, and was frequently called upon to speak 
at Masonic functions, but in recent years, ill health prevented his taking 
part in any of these affairs. 

Henry AloNzo Eidson, District Deputy Grand Master of the For- 
tieth Masonic District, died suddenly at his home in Willow Hill, Illinois, 
October 7, 1909. Brother Eidson was born in Mexico, Indiana, in 1846, 
and for many years past has been an active and useful physician. He 
was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason in Cooper Lodge No. 
489 October 7, 1868, in which he served as Worshipful Master for many 
years. He was an accomplished ritualist, and for ten or twelve years 
had held a commission as Grand Lecturer. In 1905 he was appointed 
District Deputy Grand Master for the Twenty-fourth District, and was 
reappointed in the Fortieth District upon the re-districting of the state. 
He was a man of sterling character, of the highest and strictest sense 
of honor and duty, and in his life and dealings was a faithful and con- 
stant exemplar of the principles of Masonry. His death occurred on 
the forty-first anniversary of his being made a Mason. He was laid to 
rest with the ceremonies of the craft, October 9, R.W. Bro. Chas. H. 
Martin, of Bridgeport, officiating. 

Bro. Fred P. Bacon, W.M. for one year (1890) of Scott Lodge No. 
79, died August 27, 1908. 

Bro. John R. Baldwin, W.M. for one year (1878). of Fairmount 
Lodge No. 590, died May 9, 1909. 

Bro. Charles Wallace Bassett, W.M. for three years (1890-91-0:2) 
of Ravenswood Lodge No. 777, died September 27, 1908. 

Bro. Henry D. Beam, W.M. for two years (1893-94) of Oriental 
Lodge No. 33, died June 21, 1909. 

Bro. Charles E. Bliss, W.M. for one year, of Avon Harmony 
Lodge No. 253, died June 20, 1909. 

Bro. J. W. Boren, W.M. for one year (1890) of Milton Lodge No. 
275, died October 9. 1908. 



150 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Bro. Lycurgus Booth, W.M. for three years (1874-75-79) of Ran- 
toul Lodge No. 470, died May 14, 1909. 

Bro. Daniel Brewster, W.M. for three years (1869-70-77) of 
Waukegan Lodge No. 78, died December 12, 1908. 

Bro. Charles Canisius, W.M. for two years (1885-86) of Mithra 
Lodge No. 410, died February 2, 1909. 

Bro. Cheney M. Castle, W.M. for two years (1859-1871) of Euclid 
Lodge No. 65, died February 9, 1909. 

Bro. Chester M. Clark, W.M. for one year (1872) of Galva Lodge 
No. 243, died April 25, 1909. 

Bro. Henry C.Claypool, W.M. for three years of Cedar Lodge No. 
124, died March 8/1909. 

Bro. P. Ralph Copeland, W.M. for two years (1904-05) of E. F. 
W. Ellis Lodge No. 633, died October 14, 1908. 

Bro. John C. Corlus, W.M. for two years (1865-66), of Mendota 
Lodge No. 176, died March 17, 1909. 

Bro. George W. Davis, W.M. for two years (1885-86) of Carrollton 
Lodge No. 50, died December 13, 1908. 

Bro. David H. Dickinson, W.M. for one year (1878) of Blair 
Lodge No. 393, died April 17, 1909. 

Bro. G. W. Dow, Worshipful Master of Pearl Lodge No. 823, died 
in office, September 25, 1909. 

Bro. William Duff, a Past Master of Catlin Lodge No. 285, died 
May 15, 1909. 

Bro. Joseph Newton Dunaway, W.M. for one year (1899") of Occi- 
dental Lodge No. 40, died January 9, 1909. 

Bro. George A. Dutcher, W.M. for two years (1906-07) of New 
Canton Lodge No. 821, died December 8, 1908. 

Bro. George Z. Flagler, W.M. for one year (1897) of Livingstone 
Lodge No. 371, died March 9, 1909. 

Bro. John N. Forster, W.M. for one year (1906) of Basco Lodge 
No 618, died November 17, 1908. 

Bro. George Frederick Francis, W.M. for one year (1901) of Hes- 
peria Lodge No. 411, died November 12, 1908. 

Bro. Harry David Fraser, W.M. for two years (1903-1905) of 
P.laney Lodge No. 271, died October 12, 1908. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 151 

Bro. James B. French, W.M, for one year (1894) of Garfield Lodge 
No. 686, died June 9, 1909. 

Bro. Robert Simon Frick, W.M. for one year (1904) of Lake 
Creek Lodge No. 729, died February 5, 1909. 

Bro. Henry M. Gillmore, W.M. for two years (1884-1885) of Dela- 
van Lodge No. 156, died February 1, 1909. 

Bro. A. L. Green, W.M. for two years (1893-1894) of Wabash 
Lodge No 179, died February 18, 1909. 

Bro. John Gottlieb Haage, W.M. for two years (1903-04) of 
Acacia Lodge No. 67, died May 30, 1909. 

Bro. Charles A. Hamilton, W.M. for five years (1897-98-99-1901-02) 
of Lyndon Lodge No. 750, died April 22, 1909. 

Bro. James E. Hanna, W.M. for eight years (1855-56-57-58-59-1860- 
61-62) of Golconda Lodge No. 131, died February 5, 1909. 

Bro. Alexander McC. Harper, a Past Master of Washburn Lodge 
No. 421, died March 30, 1908. 

Bro. Thomas G. Harris, W.M. for two years (1885-86) of Cleve- 
land Lodge No. 211, died September 24, 1908. 

Bro. William Hill, W.M. for one year (1883) of Kendall Lodge 
No. 471, died May 9, 1909. 

Bro. Jonah Hole, Past Master of Ridge Farm Lodge No. 632, died 
June 7, 1909. 

Bro. Wesley H. Holway, W.M. for one year (1904) of Blaney 
Lodge No. 271, died February 5, 1909. 

Bro. Isaac J. Lamb, W.M. for twelve years (1876 to 1S79-1SS0 to 
1888-1890) of Stratton Lodge No. 408, died September 20, 1908. 

Bro. Robert E. Law, W.M. for one year (1900) of Thos. J. Tur- 
ner Lodge No. 409, died May 28, 1909. 

Bro. Lucian L. Leeds, W.M. for one year (1877) of Logan Lodge 
No. 210, died June 19, 1909. 

Bro. John K. Livermore, W.M. for eleven years (1892-93-94-95-96- 
97-98-99-1900-01-06) of Raritan Lodge No. 727, died June IS, 1909. 

Bro. Frank F. Loveland, W.M. for six years (1869-70-72-73-75-76) 
of Amity Lodge No. 472, died September 18, 1908. 

Bro. Robert G. Lucas, W.M. for two years (186S-1872) of Kilwin- 
ning Lodge No. 311, died July 5, 1908. 



152 Proceedings of the (October 13. 

Bro. William McClare, W.M. for three years (1898-99-1900) of 
Buckley Lodge No. 634, died July 6, 1908. 

Bro. James A. McConnell, W.M. for ten years (1867-68-69-1871-72- 
74-77-78-79-1880) of Milford Lodge No. 168, died March 7, 1909. 

Bro. C. E. McCullough, W.M. for two years (1888-1889) of Ke- 
wanee Lodge No. 159, died April 23, 1909. 

Bro. George M. McKenney, W.M. for one year (1896) of Oregon 
Lodge No. 420, died March 20, 1909. 

Bro. Bennett H. McMillan, W.M. for one year (1895) of Olive 
Branch Lodge No. 38, died January 27, 1909. 

Bro. James W. Montgomery, W.M. for one year (1889) of Pleiades 
Lodge 'No. 478, died May 27, 1909. 

Bro. Francis A. Morley, W.M. for one year (1902) of Covenant 
Lodge No. 526, died June 1, 1909. 

Bro. John William Morris, W.M. for four years (1884-85-1893-94) 
of Cairo Lodge No. 237, died November 1, 1908. Brother Morris served 
two years as District Deputy Grand Master, and at the time of his 
death was the oldest member of Cairo Lodge. 

Bro. William L. Nicholson, a Past Master of Corinthian Lodge 
No. 205, died August 8, 1908. 

Bro. Alexander G. Orr, W.M. for eight years (1872-1889-81-82-84- 
85-86-1898) of Benton Lodge No. 64, died August 25, 1908. 

Bro. Alfred Patterson, W.M. for one year (1892) of (lodge and 
number not given), died November 10, 1908. 

Bro. Harry Eldon Preble, died June 20, 1909, while serving his 
fourth consecutive term as W.M. of Salem Lodge No. 218. 

Bro. John W. Price, W.M. for one year (1893) of Mound Lodge 
No. 122, died October 26, 1908. 

Bro. Edwin J. Raith, W.M. for one year (1883) of Highland 
Lodge No. 583, died January 17, 1909. 

Bro. James Morris Rogers, W.M. for one year (1883) of Wyoming 
Lodge No. 479, died May 20, 1909. 

Bro. Luther D. Romberger, W.M. for two years (1885-86) of 
Bureau Lodge No. 112, died July 12, 1908. 

Bro. Asbury H. Saunders, W.M. for two years (1888-89) of Cen- 
tral Lodge No. 71, died October 24, 1908. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 153 

Bro. Henry M. Schmoldt, W.M. for one year (1903) of Cass Lodge 
No. 23, died September 29, 1908. 

Bro. Thaddeus S. Simpson, W.M. for one year (1902) of Temple 
Lodge No. 46, died January 25, 1909. 

Bro. Charles F. Slade, W.M. for one year (1874) of Dundee Lodge 
No. 190, died February 17, 1909. 

Bro. Taylor L. Smith, W.M. for one year (1892) of Cass Lodge 
No. 23, died September 29, 1908. 

Bro. Andrew Steed, W.M. for two years (1877-1898) of Fidelity 
Lodge No. 152, died April 9, 1909. 

Bro. Aaron K. Stiles, Past Master of Sycamore Lodge No. 134, 
died March 30, 1909. 

Bro. William N. Storis, W.M. for two years (1907-1908) of Aroma 
Lodge No. 378, died May 4, 1909. 

Bro. James William Tate, W.M. for two years (1901-1906) of 
Jeffersonville Lodge No. 460, died April 2, 1909. 

Bro. John V. Thomas, W.M. for nine consecutive years (1873 to 
1881 inclusive) of Friendship Lodge No. 7, died October 5, 1908. 

Bro. Hezekiah R. Thomas, W.M. for one year (1879) of Apollo 
Lodge No. 642, died March 28, 1909. 

Bro. William Tinkler, W.M. for one year (1888) of lake View 
Lodge No. 774, died January 14, 1909. 

Bro. Isaac H. Tobias, W.M. for two years (1875-76) of Taylor 
Lodge No. 98, died January 20, 1909. 

Bro. Melvin L. Walker, W.M. for six years (1896-98-99-1903-06-07) 
of T. J. Pickett Lodge No. 307, died January 2, 1909. 

Bro. Edward L. Watts, W.M for four years of Waltham Lodge 
No 384, died October 14, 1908. 

Bro. Elias Nelson Weese, a Past Master of Minooka Lodge No. 
528, died June 7, 1909. 

Bro. Silas D. Wesson, W.M. for one year (1895) of Leland Lodge 
No. 558, died February 4, 1909. 

Bro. Uri W. Weston, W.M. for one year (1871) of Ashlar Lodge 
No. 308, died May 14, 1909. 

Bro. James A. Wheeler, Jr., W.M. for two years (1891-94) of 
Auburn Park Lodge No. 789, died November 14, 1908. 



154 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Bro. Edward P. White, W.M. for one year (1895) of Blair Lodge 
No. 393, died December 31, 1908. 

Bro. William H. Williamson, W.M. for three years (1875-76-77) 
of Greenview Lodge No. 653, died October 5, 1908. 

Bro. Henry C. Withers, Past Master of Carrollton Lodge No. 50, 
died March 17, 1909. 

Bro. Robert H. Woodcock, W.M. for one year (1891) of South 
Macon Lodge No. 467, died May 3, 1909. 

Bro. Alonzo Workman, W.M. for two years (1890-97) of Scotland 
Lodge No. 743, died April 20, 1909. 

In conclusion, we know that the officers and members of this Grand 
Lodge join with this Committee in extending sincere sympathy to the 
bereaved families of our deceased brethren throughout the state, and 
especially to those bereaved ones within the official circle of this Grand 
Lodge whose homes have been invaded, and their loved ones led away by 
the Angel of Death. May the Great Physician heal their sorrow, and 
restore peace and comfort to their troubled minds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. H. Thompson, 
Chas. N. Hambleton, " 
Sam'l W. Eldred, 

Committee. 
The report was adopted by a rising vote. 

RESOLUTION -Tableau of Lodges. 
M.W. Bro. Chester E. Allen presented the following reso- 
lution relating to a new issue of the Tableau of Lodges. 

Whereas, Two years have elapsed since the publication by this 
Grand Lodge of a list of Regular Masonic Lodges of the World, and 
many changes and additions have in the meantime taken place; and 

Whereas, Without such authoritative list of Regular Masonic Lodges 
it is difficult, if not impossible, for lodges to act safely and intelligently 
when members of other lodges seek to visit lodges in this Grand Juris- 
diction; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be and he is hereby directed to 
prepare a complete revised list of the Regular Masonic Lodges of the 
World, and cause one thousand copies of said revised list to be printed, 
and one copy thereof to be sent to each of the constituent lodges in this 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 155 

state, one copy to each officer and ' permanent member of this Grand 
Lodge, and one copy to each Grand Lodge with which this Grand Lodge 
is in fraternal communication. 

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Finance. 

EEPOET— Committee on Chartered Lodges. 
M.W. Bro. Chas. F. Hitchcock presented the following 
additional report for the Committee on Chartered Lodges. 

To the M.W. Grand Lodge of Illinois: 

Your Committee on Chartered Lodges fraternally report as follows : 
That portion of the Grand Master's address of 1908 relating to the 

removal of Murrayville Lodge No. 432, at Murrayville, 111., to Woodson, 

111., be approved. 

That portion of the report of the Grand Master in his address for 
1909 of the constituting of the several lodges is hereby approved. 

Fraternally submitted, 

C. F. Hitchcock, 
James L. Scott, 

S. M. SCHOEMANN, 

W. A. Dixon, 
C. M. Turner, 

Committee. 
The report was adopted. 

EEPOET— Committee on Eailroads. 
The Committee on Railroads reported through Bro. O. E. 
Tandy. 

Chicago, III., October 13, 1909. 
To the M.W. Grand Lodge, A.F. and A. Masons, of Illinois: 

Brethren : — Your Committee on Railroads and Transportation re- 
spectfully report that they made inquiry of both the Western and Cen- 
tral Passenger Associations with respect to a concession in rates in fa- 
vor of the brethren attending this session of the M.W. Grand Lodge. 

They were informed that line members of the respective Associa- 
tions had adopted a rule which had been in effect for some time, and 
which provides that no reduced rates will be granted upon the certificate 
plan unless 1,000 or more receipts for fares paid, of not loss than $1 
each, are presented for validation. As but 588 certificates were presented 
for validation in 1905, and 040 in 1900, your Committee wore reluctantly 



15b Proceedings of the (October 13. 

forced to the conclusion that it would be impossible to obtain any con- 
cession at this time. 

Your Committee also took up the question of an open excursion 
rate to Chicago, but were informed that this concession could not be 
granted, as it would result in reducing the revenue very materially on 
practically all of the local passenger traffic in the state, to and from 
Chicago, for several days. 

Subsequently the question was presented to the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Western Passenger Association by a representative of one 
of the member lines, but they decided not to make any change in the 
rule at this time. 

Your Committee are satisfied that we have not been discriminated 
against in this respect, and that we have received as liberal treatment 
as that accorded to other organizations under similar circumstances. 

Your Committee have been asked to embody in their report to this 
M.W. Grand Lodge their opinion as to the wisdom of continuing the 
appointment of a Committee on Railroads and Transportation. While 
your Committee regret that their efforts have not been productive of 
tangible results, they are of the opinion that possibly some change may 
be made in the rules governing the granting of reduced rates before the 
next annual communication of this M.W. Grand Lodge, and would re- 
spectfully suggest that, if in the judgment of the brethren it is deemed 
advisable to continue this Committee, it be appointed early in the year, 
in order that it may be in a position to keep in touch with the Pas- 
senger Associations and thereby be able to make application promptly 
should the opportunity offer. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

J. O. Clifford, 
O. E. Tandy, 

The report was adopted. Committee. 

EESOLUTION. 

The following resolution was offered by R.W. Bro. 

Henry T. Burnap. 

Resolved, That a warrant be drawn on the Grand Lodge Treasury 
for $50 in favor of R.W. Bro. W. B. Grimes, and that the same be sent 
to him by the Grand Secretary with assurances of the best wishes and 
fraternal love of the members of this Grand Lodge. 

It was referred to the Committee on Finance. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 157 

AMENDMENT TO BY-LAWS- Lost. 

Bro. Jason R. Lewis called up the amendment to Sec- 
tion 8, Article 14, Part 1, Grand Lodge By-Laws, proposed 
last year, and moved its adoption. 

Add the following as Sec. 8, to Art. 14, Part I. 

''Section 8. Whenever the Grand Master in his discretion shall 
deem it advisable, or whenever the request is made by the representatives 
of twenty lodges, the vote for the election of any elective officer of the 
Grand Lodge, or upon any question before the Grand Lodge, shall be 
taken by ballot and in the following manner, viz. : The Grand Master 
shall appoint three or more boards of tellers of three or more members 
each, to count the ballots. Every representative or brother voting shall 
pass before one of these boards, depositing his ballot and at the same 
time announcing what lodge he represents or in what capacity he votes, 
and the number of votes he casts — but not how he votes, nor for whom, 
and no brother shall be permitted to vote whose name does not appear 
on the roll of the committee on credentials. In case a brother's vote is 
challenged, the Grand Master shall take the necessary steps to verify 
his right to vote. The tellers shall take any precautions necessary to 
prevent duplication of voting, and at the close of the ballot the boards 
shall make a combined report of the result." 

The motion was lost. 

RESOLUTION. 

Bro. Roswell T. Spencer presented the following resolu- 
tion and asked that it be referred to the Committee on Cor- 
respondence for a report next year. 

Whereas, The M.W. Grand Lodge of Illinois has given qualified 
recognition to the M.W. "National Grand Lodge of Egypt, of which 
M.W. Bro. Idris Bey Ragheb is Grand Master, and M.W. Bro. John 
Corson Smith, of Illinois, is Honorary Grand Master, which warrants 
the Masons of the obedience of the Grand Lodge of Illinois in visiting 
its lodges, with the consent thereof, and permits Illinois lodges in re- 
ceiving on like terms the members of the obedience of the Grand Lodge 
of Egypt, as visitors or as applicants for affiliation, and 

Whereas, The Grand Lodge of Egypt is a regularly organized and 
legitimate Grand Lodge ; therefore be it 



158 Proceedings of the (October 13, 

Resolved, That the National Grand Lodge of Egypt be accorded full 
recognition by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, and an exchange of Grand 
Representatives be made. 

The resolution was adopted. 

AMENDMENT TO BY-LAWS-Proposed- 

Bro. John Fagan offered the following amendment to 
Article 12, Part 2, Grand Lodge By-Laws, and it being sec- 
onded by Representatives of more than twenty lodges, lies 
over until next year. 

Amend Article 12, Part 2, Grand Lodge By-Laws, by adding thereto 
a new section to be known as Sec. 11 : 

Sec. 11. No person shall be eligible to membership in the Masonic 
fraternity who is engaged in the manufacture or sale of intoxicating 
liquors as a beverage. And any Mason who engages in such business 
after the adoption of this rule shall be charged with unmasonic con- 
duct, in any lodge having jurisdiction, and shall be expelled from Ma- 
sonry; provided, however, that any Mason who is engaged in the man- 
ufacture or sale of intoxicating liquors prior to the adoption of this 
section shall not be affected by it, nor shall his standing be impaired in 
the fraternity in consequence of such business. 

The minutes of the session of Tuesday and Wednesday 
were read and approved. 

GALLED OFF. 

At 2 :20 P. M. the Grand Lodge was called from labor to 
refreshment until 9 :oo o'clock Thursday morning. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 159 



THIRD DAY. 

Thursday, Octobkr 14, A. D. 1909, A. Iy. 5909 \ 
. 9 o'clock A. M. S 

The M.W. Grand Lodge was called from refreshment to 
labor by the M.W. Grand Master at 9 o'clock. 

Prayer was offered by the R.W. Grand Chaplain. 

INTRODUCTIONS. 

The following brethren were introduced by the Grand 
Master, and grand honors were in each case accorded to the 
Grand Jurisdictions which they represent : 

R.W. Bro. Delmar D. Darrah, Representative of the Grand Lodge 
of Oklahoma. 

R.W. Bro. David D. King, Representative of the Grand Lodge of 
Wisconsin. 

R.W. Bro. J. R. Ennis, Representative of the Grand Lodge of 
Queensland. 

AMENDMENT— To By-Laws. Proposed. 
Bro. B. A. Cottlow, proxy for the Senior Warden of Ore- 
gon Lodge No. 420, presented the following amendment to 
Section 6, Article 20, Part 2, Grand Lodge By-Laws, and it 
being seconded by representatives of more than twenty 
lodges, lies over until next year. 

Sec. 6. When a member of a lodge desires to change his member- 
ship to another lodge and wishes to know whether he will be accepted by 
it before severing his connection with his lodge, he shall give his lodge 
notice in writing of his intentions. This notice shall be read in open 
lodge at a stated meeting and lie over till the next or some subsequent 
stated meeting, when, if there are no formal charges against him and 
his dues are paid three months in advance, the Secretary shall issue to 
him a certificate under seal of the lodge showing that the dues have 
been paid as aforesaid and stating for what purposes the certificate is 
issued. This certificate may be deposited with his petition in the lodge 
he wishes to join at any time within two months of its dale and be 



160 Proceedings of the (October 14, 

treated as the necessary documentary evidence referred to in Section 4, 
Article 13, Part 2, of these by-laws. If he is elected to membership in 
the petitioned lodge, the secretary thereof shall immediately notify the 
first lodge and the petitioner's membership therein shall cease from the 
time such notice is received. If such notice is not received within three 
months from the date of the certificate, he shall forfeit any rights and 
privileges acquired by means of it, be still a member of the original 
lodge and chargeable with dues therein. Nothing in this section shall 
operate to change the law regarding dimits or affiliation thereon — nor 
shall it be construed to permit a change of membership from one lodge 
to another except by regular dimit if both lodges are in the same city 
or town. 

REPORT— Committee on Credentials. 

Bro. George W. Cyrus presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on Credentials. v 

To the M.W. Grand Lodge of Illinois, A.F. and A.M.: 

Your Committee on Credentials fraternally report that the follow- 
ing brethren whose names appear in this report are present and entitled 
to seats in this Grand Lodge : 

GRAND OFFICERS. 

Bro. Alexander H. Bell M.W. Grand Master 

Bro. A. B. Ashley R.W. Deputy Grand Master 

Bro. Delmar D. Darrah R.W. Senior Grand Warden 

Bro. Henry T. Burnap R.W. Junior Grand Warden 

Bro. Leroy A. Goddard R.W. Grand Treasurer 

Bro. Isaac Cutter R.W. Grand Secretary 

Bro. J. Webster Bailey R.W. Grand Chaplain 

Bro. Euclid B. Rogers R.W. Grand Orator 

Bro. G. A. Stabler W. Deputy Grand Secretary 

Bro. F. W. Froelich W. Grand Pursuivant 

Bro. Louis Zinger W. Grand Marshal 

Bro. W. O. Butler W. Grand Standard Bearer 

Bro. J. M. Willard . W. Grand Sword Bearer 

Bro. Henry L. Whipple W. Senior Grand Deacon 

Bro. Lawrence C. Johnson W. Junior Grand Deacon 

Bro. Geo. W. Hamilton W. Grand Steward 

Bro. Henry S. Albin W. Grand Steivard 

Bro. Chester S. Gurney Bro. Grand Tyler 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 161 

PAST GRAND OFFICERS. 

Bro. W. H. Scott Past Grand Master 

Bro. W. J. A. DeLancey Past Deputy Grand Master 

Bro. Chas. Fisher Past Senior Grand Master 

Bro. George M. Moulton Past Grand Master 

Bro. John Corson Smith Past Grand Master 

R.W. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 

Bro. Harry W. Harvey First District 

Bro. Robert R. Jampolis Second District 

Bro. Albert Roullier Third District 

Bro. David D. King Fourth District 

Bro ,Wm. H. Bied Fifth District 

Bro. Edward W. Peterson Sixth District 

Bro. Lewis Pickett Seventh District 

Bro. Jay L. Brewster .Eighth District 

Bro. James M. Huff Ninth District 

Bro. John W. Oliver Tenth District 

Bro. W. J. Emerson Eleventh District 

Bro. James McCredie Twelfth District 

Bro. W. C. Stilson Thirteenth District 

Bro. Milton T. Booth Fourteenth District 

Bro. Francis H. Bradley Fifteenth District 

Bro. John B. Fithian Seventeenth District 

Bro. Nathaniel T. Stevens Eighteenth District 

Bro. L. E. Rockwood ■■x Nineteenth District 

Bro. John C. Weis Twentieth District 

Bro. Charles T. Holmes Twenty-first District 

Bro. C. L. Gregory Tzventy-sccond District 

Bro. Emerson Clark Tzventy-third District 

Bro. D. H. Glass Twenty-fourth District 

Bro. L. W. Lawton Twenty-fifth District 

Bro. H. M. Palmer Twenty-sixth District 

Bro. C. L. Sandusky Twenty-seventh District 

Bro. Wilson P. Jones Twenty-eighth District 

Bro. N. M. Mesnard Twenty-ninth District 

Bro. Sidney S. Breese Thirtieth District 

Bro. C. P. Ross Thirty-first District 

Bro. W. W. Watson Thirty-second District 

Bro. Emmett Howard Thirty-third District 

Bro. R. M. Riggs Thirty-fourth District 

Bro. C. H. Burgdorff Thirty-fifth District 

Bro. D. W. Starr Thirty-sixth District 

-11 



162 Proceedings of the (October 14, 

Bro. Chas. G. Young Thirty-seventh District 

Bro. J. E. Jeffers Thirty-eighth District 

Bro. H. Gasaway Thirty-ninth District 

Bro. Anthony Doherty Forty-second District 

Bro. Enos Johnson ' Forty-third District 

Bro. Geo. S. Caughlan Forty-fourth District 

Bro. J. R. Ennis Forty-sixth District 

Bro. I. A. Foster Forty-seventh District 

Bro. W. D. Abney Forty-eighth District 

Bro. Wm. H. Peak Forty-ninth District 

Bro. Joseph K. West Fiftieth District 

REPRESENTATIVES OF OTHER GRAND LODGES. 

Bro. H. A. Snell Alberta 

Bro. C. E. Allen Alabama 

Bro. Roswell T. Spencer Arkansas 

Bro. S. O. Spring Canada 

Bro. Albert Roullier Colorado 

Bro. C. F. Hitchcock • Connecticut 

Bro. John C. Smith .- England 

Bro. John C. Smith Florida 

Bro. W. J. A. DeLancey Georgia 

Bro. Robert R. Jampolis Idaho 

Bro. Wm. B. Wright .... Indiana 

Bro. Thomas E. Miller *. Ireland 

Bro. Geo. M. Moulton Kansas 

Bro. Leroy A. Goddard Louisiana 

Bro. Joseph E. Dyas Michigan 

Bro. Ralph H. Wheeler Minnesota 

Bro. John C. Smith Mississippi 

Bro. G. A. Stadler ' Missouri 

Bro. Albert Jampolis Nebraska 

Bro. John C. Smith Nevada 

Bro. John C. Weis New Brunswick 

Bro. Henry E. Hamilton Nezv Hampshire 

Bro. Henry E. Hamilton ■ New Mexico 

Bro. J. B. McFatrich North Carolina 

Bro. Roswell T. Spencer New South Wales 

Bro. L. B. Dixon Nova Scotia 

Bro. Delmar D. Darrah Oklahoma 

Bro. J. R. Ennis Queensland 

Bro. John Johnston Quebec 

Bro. James A. Steele .Saskatchewan 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 163 

Bro. Elmer E. Beach South Carolina 

Bro. Roswell T. Spencer Tasmania 

Bro. Alexander H. Bell Tennessee 

Bro. Roswell T. Spencer Victoria 

Bro. David D. King Wisconsin 

COMMITTEES. 
Appeals and Grievances. 

Bro. M. C. Crawford lonesboro 

Bro. Joseph E. Dyas Paris 

Bro. H. H. Montgomery Carrollton 

Bro. George R. Smith Bloomington 

Bro. A. M. West Galesburg 

Chartered Lodges. 

Bro. C. F. Hitchcock Peoria 

Bro. Chester M. Turner Cambridge 

Bro. James L. Scott , . .Mattoon 

Bro. S. M. Schoemann McLeansboro 

Bro. W. A. Dixon Decatur 

Correspondence. 
Bro. Edward Cook Chicago 

Credentials. 

Bro. Geo. W. Cyrus .Camp Point 

Bro. C. E. Grove Rock Island 

Bro. W. E. Hadley East St. Louis 

Finance. 

Bro. S. O. Spring Peoria 

Bro. Nelson N. Lampert Chicago 

Bro. Thomas A. Stevens Chicago 

Grand Master's Address. 

Bro. J. M. Hannum Lostant 

Bro. James E. Wooters Taylorville 

Bro. EI. L. Browning East St. Louis 

Lodges Under Dispensation. 

Bro. H. C. Mitchell Carbondale 

Bro. M. Bates Iott Evanston 

Bro. J. W. Hamilton Danville 

Bro. I. H. Todd East St. I omw 

Bro. John Johnston ( 'hicago 



164 Proceedings of the . (October 14, 

Jurisprudence. 

Bro. H. A. Snell Litchfield 

Bro. C. E. Allen Galesburg 

Bro. Edward Cook . . . . Chicago 

Bro. W. B. Wright Effingham, 

Mileage and Per Diem. 

Bro. W. F. Beck Olney 

Bro. H. T. Goddard Carmi 

Bro. G. A. Lacken Good Hope 

Obituaries. 

Bro. C. N. Hambleton Jeffersonville 

Bro. C. H. Thompson Cairo 

Bro. S. W. Eldren Quincy 

Petitions. 

Bro. Ben Hagle .Louisville 

Bro. F. E. Baldwin Jacksonville 

Bro. J. E. Wheat Maywood 

Railroads and Transportation. 

Bro. James O. Clifford Wheaton 

Bro. O. E. Tandy Jacksonville 

To Examine Visiters. 

Bro. Charles H. Martin Bridgeport 

Bro. S. S. Borden ! Chicago 

Bro. Austin H. Scrogin Lexington 

Bro. R. T. Morrow Virden 

Bro. Chas. S. DeHart Carthage 

Masonic Home. 

Bro. George M. Moulton Chicago 

Bro. James A. Steele Sullivan 

Bro. Henry W. Berks Champaign 

Bro. Owen Scott Decatur 

Bro. Thomas E. Miller Chicago 

Bro. Robert J. Daly Chicago 

Special Committee on New Lodges. 

Bro. A. B. Ashley Decatur 

Bro. D. D. Darrah Bloomington 

Bro. H. T. Burnap Upper Alton 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



165 



Representatives of Lodges. 



no. 



NAMES. 



1 S. O. Pearce W. M. 

2 F. O. Sawyer 

Allen Beltz S. W. 

3 J. S. Hackett W. M. 

4 Louis M. Myers 

James Reynolds .... J. W. 

7 James O. Barley W. M. 

8 Herbert C. Bush 

9 Thos. E. Bottenberg. 

J. G. McFedus J. W. 

13 Frederick E. Hoberg*.W. M. 

14 R. B. Hooker 

15 John F. Johnson 

16 N. C. Gochenour S. W. 

17 S. P. Odenweller W. M. 

19 John Boden 

Samuel Watkins* ... J. W. 

20 R. C. Williams W. M. 

23 John W. Fagan 

24 W. A. Hough 

25 J. G. Seitz* " 

27 Geo. T. Davis S. W. 

29 Chas. Zoeller W. M. 

S. C. Scrimger* S. W. 

31 Wainwright Davis . . .W. M. 

33 Franklin S. Catlin . . S. W. 
Everett J. Clark J. W. 

34 O. K. Garrett W. M. 

35 O. B. Root 

F. N. Todd J- W. 

36 Edward A. Laign W. M. 

37 J. B. C. Leitz 

38 W. Y. Ludwig 

H. P. Blose St W. 

39 H. C. Mueller W. M. 

40 W. E. Speckman 

42 J. W. Brockway .... " 

H. A. Bowers S. W. 

F. E. Whallon* J. W. 

43 Frank C. Fisher 

44 John A. Bond W. M. 

45 Jno. Craven, Jr 

46 W. H. Coleman 

A. M. Otman J. W. 

47 F. M. Stringer " 

48 L. C. Caldwell 

H. L. D'urant ....... S. W. 

R. H. Cutler J. W. 

49 Gust Eastland W. M. 

S. H. Burrows* S. W. 

50 Robert E. Rumrill . .W. M. 

51 R. E. Gifford " 

52 Wm. A. Schmitt 

53 Wm. Taylor 

55 L. T. Phillips 

57 J. W. Fouder 

58 A. T. Pipher* 

59 E. L. Willits 

60 Max M. Lucas S. W. 

61 Lewis T. Wood W. M. 

64 J. E. Webster 

Carl Burschart* S. W. 

W. B. Martin* J. W. 

♦Proxy. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



65 N. J. Wagner W. M. 

66 L. A. Jackson* 

67 Elmer Tregoy 

Isaac Guthmann S. W. 

Lyman Sanders J. W. 

69 C. H. Smith W. M. 

71 G. B. Weakley 

74 C. B. Williamson S. W. 

75 C. A. Ranson W. M. 

E. H. Wilson* S. W. 

76 C. H. Woods W. M. 

77 J. B. Gamron " 

78 L. A. Hendee 

M. S. Fegan* S. W. 

79 J. Q. Roane J. W. 

80 J. H. Winters W. M. 

R. H. Pritchett S. W. 

81 Adam Melzer W. M. 

Herman Rugen S. W. 

Aug. Clancy J. W. 

84 Sherman G. Hull W. M. 

85 E. F. Bartle " 

86 Wm. M. Schuwerk . . 

87 H. W. Schafer " 

88 C. E. Walsh 

89 A. M. Edwards 

90 H. D. Hamper 

91 John M. Boicourt ... 

92 Jas. Dobbs 

John D. Wood J. W. 

93 Wm. E. Nixon W. M. 

95 C. T. Beatty 

96 Gregor Thompson* . . 

97 Roy L. Burkhardt . . . S. W. 

98 L. J. Kern W. M. 

99 Cyrus A. Geers 

100 A. C. Scott 

102 Richard F. Lock 

Junius C. Snow J. W. 

103 Perry Dakin W. M. 

R. L. Swindler J. W. 

104 Grier Hanson W. M. 

105 Joseph K. Gordon*... 

106 Jehu I. Maple* 

108 H. T. Williams 

109 Jas. S. Anderson .... 

110 Edwin P. Baker .... 

111 W. A. Rendleman . . . 

112 H. L. Parker 

113 A. R. Wycoff " 

114 F. P. Taylor S. W. 

115 C. J. Wightman* W. M. 

R. W. Shurehill S. W. 

116 Chas. Jenkins W. M. 

117 W. H. Newton 

118 Newton B. Rohrer . . 

122 C. N. Miller 

123 W. S. Wilson* 

124 Milford B. Hull J. W. 

125 J. W. Ozler W. M. 

126 J F. Kaylor S. W. 

127 John A. Thain S ^ 

128 W. T. Cable W. M. 



166 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 



140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 

153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
164 
165 
166 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
182 



183 
185 
187 
188 
189 
190 
192 



B. N. Kincaid W. M. 

Joe M. Morrow 

J. H. Benham* 

Roy H. Pepper J. W. 

J. R. Burnett W. M. 

A E. Hammerschmidt. " 

A. K. Cory J. W. 

Charles G. Pearce W. M. 

O. J. Davis 

Donald E. Loomis . . . S. W. 

C. A. Lindahl W. M. 

L. T. Wilcox S. W. 

L. A. Smith J. W. 

A. G Telford W. M. 

J H. Wizler " 

C. A. Smirington " 

A. M. Gibbs " 

C. J. L. Borine " 

E. R. Kidder 

F. M. Blowers 

J. L. Tarbox 

A. E. Schmilster 

W. M. Stewart 

Thos E. Gillespie " 

E. R. Welsh 

O. P. Erwin 

L. J. Richardson . . . . S. W. 
O. J. Hagebush W. M. 

D. H. Bowen 

Chas. Burkhardt .... 

Arthur R. Patzer S. W. 

Benj. Bing . W. M. 

W. F. Gallaher 

L. L. Priestman .... 
P. G. Statefeld 

B. C. Corr 

Saul E. G'rigg, Jr 

J. A. G. Black . . . S. W. 

F. C. Bawden 

W. E. Jaycox W. M. 

E. W. Scott* " 

W. W. Roberts 

Joseph M. Brown ... 

J. D. Smith 

J. B. Hollibaugh J. W. 

Hosea B. Kezar W. M. 

D. M. DeGraff 

Lawrence D'obson ... " 

E. G. McMackin 

Jas. W. Donaldson... " 

F. L. Doty S. W. 

Ernest Chamberlin . .W. M. 
Jno.. L. Klump 

Geo. E. Koehler .... 

C. O. Kuehne S. W. 

Wm. Arens J. W. 

Geo. S. Wiley W. M. 

A. D. Underwood ... " 
W. T. Schell, Jr " 

J. C. Mills " 

John Wolters " 

A. Winteringham ... 
A. A. Lackey 

*Proxy. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
199 
200 
201 

203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 

210 
211 



212 
213 
214 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 

226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 

233 

234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 

241 
243 
244 
245 
246 

2*7 

248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 



G. F. Hubbard 

G. A. Starkweather. 
Gustave J. Malaise 
George E. Campbell 
A. N. Tolliver . . . 

N. H. Close 

Geo. H. Astell . . . 

W. O. Pope 

Richard H. Horn . 
Harry E. Sisson. . . 
S. J. McKinney . . 

C. E. Hemphill . . 
Chas. T. Preston . 
Nicholas M. Powell 

A. L. Linn 

John C. Whitman 
Geo. R. Lundy . . . 
John H. Engweil. 
Albert Brown .... 
Wm. K. Spiece . . 

W. F. Price 

Frank Moe 

Chas. N. Bullman 

B. S. Diehl 

J. N. English 

H. B. Roebuck . . . 
Edward Ruffner . . 
Sol. G. Chanie . . . 
Frank S. Winkler. 

F. O. Jahr 

J. E. Mackay* . . . 

J. S. Dailey 

Wm. T. Crew . . . 
Chas. E. Barnett . 
J. Y. Lawless .... 
W. B. Shirey* . . . 

Sam F. Loar 

J. H. Graddy 

Henry A. Gramer. 
H. W. Holifield... 

J. K. West* 

W. A. Grigsby . . . 
J. W. Hemenway . 

A. P. Layton 

P. J. Rese 

W. F. Gibson 

O. E. McCartney . 
W. A. Stansfield . 
Frank M. Brown. . 

D. G. Swannell . . . 
Frank M. Caldwell 
"V. A. Weyren .... 

J. E. Barber* 

Edgar E. Cox .... 
Chester F. Curtiss 
Lloyd A. Girard . 
Homer A. Millard 
James A. Rose ... 

S. G. Brown 

F. E. Lathrop 

L. T. Rutledge . . . 
Elmer E. Bower . 
Geo. A. Tompkins 



W. 
M. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



167 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



254 
255 
257 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 



272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 

278 
279 
280 
282 
283 
285 
286 
287 



291 
292 
295 
296 
297 
298 
301 
302 

303 

305 



306 
307 
308 



309 
310 
311 

312 



1 1 3 



314 
316 



Walter Lintott W. M. 

A. M. Sharp 

C. C. Crawford S. W. 

G'. N. Todd W. M. 

C. W. Cardiff 

Alfred A. Meradith . . 
A. J. Zimmerman.... 

E. P. Harrison " 

Albertus Dickson ... 

L. M. Morrison " 

Everett E. Wolfe ... " 

M. J. Gallagher 

Arthur L. Perrottet.. 

S. P. Prescott 

S. W. Polkey 

Chas. B. Gibson S. W. 

Albert E. Barker J. W. 

T. H. Land W. M. 

S. J. Hughlett 

J. M. Heald 

C. Clemmons " 

R. F. Taylor 

Ernst Keppler 

Aug H. Kropp S. W. 

J. H. Thornton* " 

N. R. Whitney W. M. 

Frank S. Anderson. . . S. W. 

F. B. Johnson W. M. 

Thomas McNiece* . . . 

W. T. Boggess 

R. L. Cloud 

Marion Kelley 

Elme A. Somers* 

G. J. Patterson S. W. 

Hamilton Taylor* . . .W. M. 
LeRoy A. Knapp . . . S. W. 

W. E. Downey J. W. 

Fred W. Chumbley . . . W. M. 

Jont Ensminger " 

Martin E. Fuller* ... 

L. E. Davis 

S. J. Randall 

F. L. Randall S. W. 

Lewis P. Voss S. W. 

Ira W. Furby W. M. 

J. L. Shawl* S. W. 

Chas. E. Kram J. W. 

Julius L. Krause . . . .W. M. 

Geo. D. Bell 

Julius Reynoldstine . . " 

Halkett Pattullo S. W. 

F. G. Arnett J. W. 

W. C. Wellington*. . .W. M. 
Edward R. Roe ....... 

Albert S. Greshon . . 

Chas. Weiland S. W. 

R. C. Peck* W. M. 

A. T. Summer* S. W. 

W. L. Allen J. W. 

T. W. Richards W. M. 

J. D. Thomas* I. W. 

H. H. Pahlman W. M. 

Frank F. Butzon* .... " 

*Proxy. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
325 
327 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
339 
340 
341 

342 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
353 
354 
355 
356 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 

365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
371 
373 
374 
378 

379 
380 
382 
383 
384 
385 

386 
388 
389 
390 
391 



H- N. Holmes w M 

Geo. W. Flood . . '» 

James W. Shaw* . . \ \ 

I. D. Woodford. 

Robert W. Turner... 

N. A. Houge ... 

A. G. Abney ... 

W. C. McKamy ..'.'.'.'. 

A. L. Roby g. W. 

Jerry Brinker W M 

c. g s to van ;; w \, m - 

James L. Taylor 

Geo. R. Stout 

Godfrey Wys 

James R. T. Fitch .' .' .' [ 

H. J. Sawyer . . «« 

Henry Terry 

J. M. Wiswell \ 

I. C. Duncan 

H. R. Crane '.'.'. g ^y- 

Chas. T. Lang w M 

Chas. H. Hiswald S. W." 

Ray W. Durstine*. . .M W 

V. I. Ball 

John E. Raymond...'. 

W. E. McClure 

A. F. Jewel* 

C. D. Snydam 

John F. Goudy 

A. C. Bancroft 

Geo. W. Jones 

Wesley Stone 

Joseph White 

A. J. Holmes 

Samuel G. Peck ..... S. W. 

A. H. Sloan W. M. 

Louis J. Scheve 

James Smith " 

C. A. Vance 

Ray Richardson .... 

W. Baldwin S. W. 

Thomas J. Tucker ...W. M. 
J. A. Wesch " 

F. A. Gibson 

G. S. Brown 

J. W. Hanness 

W. J. Drew 

S. J. Hobbs " 

M. Bloomingdale .... 

Owen L. Day 

Edgar F. Beebe S. W. 

Jacob Hinckle W. M. 

E. W. Pond S. W. 

Thos. Dodsworth ....W. M. 
Chas. B. Stauffer ... 

John C. Brown 

Ward A. Bristol 

John L. Brearton ... S. W. 

C. A. Cullison W. M. 

W. F. Reynold 

Geo. J. Wohner s . \v 

.i. !•:. Dudley w. m. 

J. P. Crawford 



168 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



392 
393 
394 
396 
397 
398 
399 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
408 
409 



410 



411 

412 
414 
415 
416 
418 
419 
420 

421 

422 



423 

424 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
436 
437 



440 
411 

442 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
453 



J. W. Heckethorn 

ID. F. Ballard 

C. W. Johns 

L. P. Beals 

Ira G. Sef t 

John W. Doolan . 

T. A. Zink 

John L. Tombaugh 

F. W. Stark 

J. F- Rissinger . . . 
Frank E. Downs . 
Mason V. Carter , 
H. L. Windsor . • . 

Oliver Souder 

August H. Buege . 
Charles P. Thompson 

John A. Sizer 

Charles Oestreich 
Charles Lauer . . . 

Matt Hibbeler 

Frank Stumm 

W. F. G'raves .... 
Silas "Wait 

C. O. R. Stabeck . 
Grant Burdick . . . 
H. B. Tenderson . 
Louis G. Joseph . 

H. C. McCoy 

John Nugent 

B. A. Cottlow* . . . 
Chas. H. Inland . 
John H. Riddle . . 
Orin M Bales* . . . 
Jacob L. Albright 

J. R. Snively 

E. M. Tallman* . 
W. H. Sappington 
James B. Ogg . . . 
John J. Fox 

D. M. Baird 

Wm. O. Brown* . 
Lee F. Morton . . . 

C. C. Nye 

C. C. Sief 

Frank W. Ole 

Geo. Granger 

John Fife* 

Sidney A. Pollack 
R. H. Wollner . . . 

Max Levy 

Fred Ebel 

T. Van Antwerp . 
Ralph M. Brooke . 

Ed. T. Crock 

C. A. Okerson .... 

E. C. Harper 

James O. Bailey . 

E. H. Mills 

T. J. Kightlinger* 

Jacob Funk 

H. W. Colburn . . . 
W. H. Melhorn . . . 
Geo. H. Ellis 



W. M. 



W. 
M. 



W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 

M. 



W. 

M. 

W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 



. S. 

.w. 



. S. 

J. 

,w. 
. s. 
,w. 



w. 

M. 



W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 

M. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



454 
455 
456 
458 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
478 

479 
481 
482 
484 

485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
491 
492 
493 
495 
496 
497 
498 
500 
501 
502 
503 



504 
505 
506 

508 



509 

510 
512 
514 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 



Chas. J. Spooner 
C. E. Padgitt . . . 
Joseph Weinstein 
G. W. Erwin . . . 
W. E. Morgan . 
W. J. Donahue . 
R. L. Smith . . . 
C. E. Wheeler . . 

W. E. Scott 

John Melvin . . . 
H. D. Lawrence 

E. O. Willoughby 
T. W. Nixon . . . 
Worley C. Smith 
Henry M. Morris 
R. D. Chappell . 
H. P. Bartlett . 
W. S. Hilbert . . 
Henry Rueck* 
Elzie Cannon* 
James A. McComas 
Alf. Johnson . . 
Chas. R. Young 
Geo. E. Scott . . 
J. M. Eyler . . 
Chas. S. Lawrence 
John M. Lieb . . . 
Wilber Bartley . . 
Alex S. Jessup . . 
C. P. Jacobs .... 
Frank H. Pease . 
C. W. Tolwer . . . 
John W. Ransdell 

M. J. Piatt 

John Auston* . . . 
John Warren* . . 
J. H. Blackman . 
J. E. Shields . . . 

F. A. Wnorowski 

G. J. Koons 

Geo. Taylor, Jr. . 
Abel H. White . . 
F. W. Overstreet 
Chas. E. Sloam . . 

F. H. Robinson . 

G. A. Smith 

W. M. Stiner . . . 

E. F. Gates 

N. S. Pearce .... 
Geo. Eph grave . . 
L. Johnson 

E. K. Bennington 

B. R. Talley 

V. S. Fildes 

J. A. Hindman . . 

F. L. Muhl 

E. H. Phenix 

Carl J. Seastrand 

W. D. Lipe 

J. F. Kyler 

Chas. Carr 

E. S. Alden* 

H. C. Roberts . . . 



M. 

W. 

M. 



W. 
M. 



W. 
M. 



W. 
M. 



W. 

M. 



W. 

W. 

M. 



W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 

M. 



: Proxy. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



169 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



522 Edw. F. Prideaux . . .W. M. 

523 W. H. Whitney 

524 A. W. Gould 

Fred B. Merrell S. W. 

A. W. Gage J. W. 

525 Jas. D. Marshall W. M. 

526 Geo. N. Schmidt 

A. J. Bernhard S. W. 

Berkley Brandt J. W. 

527 John Maury* W. M. 

528 Albert C. Heap 

529 M. W. Bowker 

530 G. G. Shearer* 

531 John D. Charters ... 

532 Chas. H. R. Thomas*. 

533 Sidney S. Smith 

534 C. L. Funk S. W. 

535 G. H. Wayne W. M. 

536 C M. Reeves " 

537 D. J. Holtmann 

538 C. H. Foster* 

539 Stephen S. Hitch 

540 S. B. Harvey 

Elmer Hill S. W. 

W. B. Fisk J. W. 

541 J. B. Singer W. M. 

542 Harry E. Tilbury 

543 William R Freek 

J. W. Heany S. W. 

544 R. E. Simmons W. M. 

547 Thomas L. Bedford. .W. M. 

Henry T. Walters J. W. 

550 C. R. Condit W. M. 

5o2 A. M. Smith 

554 Oscar Formhals 

556 Arthur E. Stoker 

Henry Wiley J. W. 

557 Henry W. Huttman..W. M. 
Adolph Steidler S. W. 

Sophus Dabelstein ... J. W. 

558 Al. A. Clapsaddle . . .W. M. 

559 A. P. Atherton 

R. I. Houghton S. W. 

560 Oscar Latowsky W. M. 

562 Chas. H. Schuler ... 

564 Wm. Van Matre J. W. 

565 W. A. Windmiller . . .W. M. 

566 Louis Hoobler 

567 N. J. Henson 

569 C. E. Bagly 

570 R. C. Singley 

P. V. Coover S. W. 

572 H. A. Maxwell W. M. 

573 Walter Ferguson .... " 

574 Ernest M. Hamilton.. 

575 A. R. Montgomery ... 

576 A. B. Gordon 

577 F. D. Sexton 

578 Geo. H. White 

580 J. F. Adams 

581 J. H. Eddlemnn 

582 A. H. Williams 

T. J. Karr* S. W. 



NO. 



NAMES. 





A. E. McCoy* 


. J. 


583 


Adolph P. Mosimann 


.W. 


584 


Erie A. Johnson . . . 




585 


Norton E. Porter . . . 




587 


Jas. L. Norman 






Eugene Moran 


. s. 


588 


H. Canedy 


• W. 


590 


W. H. Goodwin 




591 


G. L. Harris 




592 


Chas. W. Brown . . . 




595 


A. L. Blythe 




600 


John W. Vent 




601 


F. E. Hewitt 




602 


J. F. Henderson . . . 




603 


J. I. Brydon 




604 


W. M. Miller* 




607 


E. M. Griggs 




608 


C. A. McClain* 




609 


Chas. H. Christenson. 




610 


Jason R. Lewis .... 




611 


Oscar A. Kropf 




612 


W. J. Burleigh 




613 


J. S. Hudspell 






Geo. H. Pope 


. s. 


614 


H. M. Miller 


. J. 


616 


Burley Jones 


.w. 


617 


G. C. James 




618 


Albert Naegelin .... 




620 


James Snyder 




622 


H. Jennings 




623 


Wm. Cranford 




627 


William J. D'amron . 




630 


John W. McGhee . . 




631 


W. R. Watts 


. s. 


632 


F. M. Hole 


.w. 


633 


Fred H. Gregory* . . 




634 


Edwin Hull 


.vv. 


635 


J. D. Hunter 




636 


W. E. Imholz 




639 


Samuel Levine .... 


' 


641 


M. H. Hand 






John Kruger* 


. J. 


642 


David H. Shonkair. . 


.vv. 




Chas. A. Stevenson.. 


. s. 




Menz I. Rosenbaum 


. J. 


643 


Chas. W. Bastgen... 


.w. 




Nicholas Heinsen . . 


. s. 




Herman Perl 


. J. 


644 


J. G. Brown 


.w. 


645 


John Fryer 




646 


Daniel H. Knight... 


. J. 


647 


H. T. Gardner 


.w. 


648 


Thos. Hester 




651 


A. J. Quick 


' 


653 


C. H. Derry 


' 




J. H. Stone* 


. s. 




S. N. Alkine* 


.1. 


655 


T. A. Curnow 


.w. 


656 


Wm. Fev 


' 


657 


J. T. Evans 


. s. 


658 


o. w. Schwenker . . . 


.w. 


6 5 !' 


H. C Bruhn 


. s. 


660 


J. M. Jones 


,w. 



w. 

M. 



W. 
M. 



W. 

w. 

M. 



W. 
M. 



M. 



W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 
„ M - 

w. 

M. 



W. 

w. 

M. 

w. 

M. 
w. 

M 



'Proxy. 



170 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



662 

664 
665 

666 

667 
668 
669 



670 
672 
673 

674 



675 

676 
677 
679 
680 
681 
682 

683 

684 
685 
686 



687 
688 
690 

691 
692 
693 
695 
696 
697 

698 
700 
701 
702 
704 
705 
706 
710 
711 
712 
713 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
721 
722 



T. A. Hewitt* W. M. 

Oliver J. Graham . . J. W. 
Jacob S. Clagg W. M. 

F. B. Huffman 

G. W. Tipsword* S. W. 

James T. A they W. M. 

G. E. Thompson J. W. 

Geo. H. Brown W. M. 

Felix Von Wyszonwinski- 

Wysow " 

Chas. Zietzen S. W. 

Henry Duppe J. W. 

V. A. Bost W. M. 

E. S. Barger " 

Frank Phillips " 

Phillipp Weicker ... " 
Gustav Baumgartner . S. W. 

Chas. Thetard J. W. 

Geo. E. Galyen W. M. 

R. V. Murphy* J. W. 

W. H. Thomas 

W. R. Miller* W. M. 

M. M. Marquis* .... 

O. W. Jacobson .... " 

Geo. M. Wilson 

A. A. Bauer " 

C. L. Montgomery* . . J. W. 

Geo. W. Carlisle W. M. 

John F. Ryan " 

Edward J. Tye 

Geo. E. Haley 

John Johnston* S. W. 

Chas. Workman* ... J. W. 

W. A. Musse W. M. 

Peter Wright* . . J. W. 

John C. Kane W. M. 

B. W. Plane J. W. 

Eli Patrick* W. M. 

Alva W. Jones S. W. 

A. A. Murray W. M. 

L. E. Lexdenbostel . . J. W. 
Isaac D. Hampton . .W. M. 
Chas. A. Ehrenwertt. " 
John P Zingelman. . . S. W. 

Carson Lawyer W. M. 

W. H. Doranch 

R. C. Green 

J. R. McCall 

J. W. Patterson* ... " 

D. G. Fitzgeovell ... 

R. H. Frizzell 

John W. Kendall S. W. 

Rob't Schmook W. M. 

Samuel Harrison .... " 

E. M. Turner 

D'. M. Fowler 

S. A. Symmonds .... " 

Rob't Arens " 

Thos. McManus .... 

Ira Shain " 

N. A. Norris 

J. R. Walker 

O. Baechler " 



NO. 



NAMES. 



723 


Seth W. Holleman. 


. S. W. 


724 


Albert Amant 


.W. M. 


725 


H. J. Beuers 


" 


796 


F. P. Dean 


" 


727 


James Tilley 


. s. w. 


729 


M. Ozment 


.W. M. 


730 




" 


731 


B. F. Hedges 


" 




A. C. Bell 


. S. w. 




Chas. Watson 


. J. w. 


732 


W. C. Vaughn 


.W. M. 


733 


J. H. White 


" 


734 


J. B. Sympson .... 


" 


735 


H. M. Powers .... 


" 


737 


Wm. O. Gilbert . . . 


" 


738 


C. T. Ross 


" 


739 


J. W. Leverenz . . . 


" 


741 


James Ryan 


" 


742 


D. E. Maurer 


" 


743 


J. F. Jennings* . . . 


" 


744 


S. C. D. Rea 


" 




Hosea Rea* 


. . s. w. 


745 


F. J. Waterstreet . 


.W. M. 


746 


Chas. C. Lisenby . . 


" 


747 


W. H. Rickey 


. " 


748 


W. C. Chambers . . 




749 


J. J. Bundy ...... 


. . s. w. 


750 


P. C. Riley 


.W. M. 


751 


E. F. Wickman . . . 


" 




E. Meyer 


. J. w. 


752 


J. A. Kogan* 


.W. M. 


754 




" 


Walter V. Cooper . 


. . s. w. 


755 


S. S. Johnston 


. .W. M. 


756 


F. S. Hurlbert 


, " 


757 
758 


C C Fenn 


" 


Mark D. Taylor . . . 


. 


759 


W. A. Newman . . . 




761 


H. D. Young 


. 


762 


Joe Johnson 


. 


763 


Frank B. Wilder* . 




764 


H. C. Shirey 


" 




C. W. Cofer 


. . s. w. 


765 


Henry Denhardt . . 


. .W. M. 




H. M. Raehlitz . . . 


. . S W. 




L. E. Taylor 


. J. W. 


766 


P. M. Powell 


. .W. M. 


767 


James W. Swope . 


" 


768 


Louis M. Russell . 






W. H. Mooney .... 


. . s. w. 




G. W. Van Berner. . 


. J. w. 


769 


Jos. R. Morrison . . 


. .W. M. 


770 


Harry C. Knisely . 


t " 


771 


C. A. Golden 


" 


772 


Robert W. Alsbrook 


" 


773 


W. R. Merseran . . . 


. J. w. 


774 


Chas. A. Rohde . . . 


. .W. M. 




A H Fry 


. . s W. 


776 


D. F. King 


.W. M. 


777 


E. John Merki .... 


" 




John B. Irwin .... 


. . s. w. 




Chas. R„ Casler 


. J. w. 



Rroxy. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



171 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



780 
782 
783 



784 



786 

787 



788 
789 



790 
791 
792 
793 
794 
795 
796 
797 
798 
799 
800 



801 
802 
803 
804 
805 
806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
812 
813 



814 
816 
817 

818 



819 

820 
821 
822 
823 
824 
825 
826 

827 
829 
830 



rk 



NAMES. 

A. T. Hazel 

Albert J. Nelson 
Herbert Richards 
Ira J. McDowell 

J. F. Payne 

Fred W. Giesen 
Wait Seipert . . . 

E. Weber 

Fred Johnson . . 
Thos. Weston . . . 

H. E. Knoth 

John Marland . . 

J. C. Fults 

A. J. Koeingsma 
W. H Williams*. . 
Geo. L. Watson 
C. E. Tallman . . 
Joseph W. Taylor 
Roy D. Platner . . 
Harry Allen .... 
G. H. Wintjen . 
Clark Herrold . . . 
John W. Pyles . 
Harry W. Boos . . 
W. A. Jolley . . . 
Oliver M. Zeis . . 
Joseph S. Smith 

Wm. Gaddis 

A. E. Dutton . . . 

I. H. Powell 

G. H. Brosniham 
H. L. Wardlow* . . 
W. B. Miller . . . 
Chas. S. Russell 

H. A. Wray* 

Jas. W. Mclntyre 
John Blackwell* 

J. M. Boster 

R. Jones .... 

R. Elam 

J. Bickel 

H. Wood 

A. Brinkerd . . 
C. Groctzmger* 
John Mirkle, Jr.. 
A. J. Jackson . . . 
S. M. Combs .... 
J. L. Whiteside . 
A. J. Eklers .... 
A. N. Engle* . . . 
E. G. Esseimeer . 
C. E. Regues .... 

J. Janes 

C. T. McLean . . . 
W. H. Foster . . . 
T. J. Hugbes . . . 
M. W. Hooker . . 
N. C. Pearce .... 
O. D. Makepeace. , 
Geo. P. Thomas 

H. M. Ely 

Frank B. Huber 
John W. Bott . . 
Chas. E. Miller 



.W. M. 



. S. 
.W. 



W. 
M. 



W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 

W. 
, M - 

w. 
w. 

M. 



W. 
M. 

W. 

W. 

M. 



. S. 
J. 

,w. 

. s. 
,w. 

. s. 
J. 

AY. 
J. 

. s. 
.w. 

. s. 

,w. 

J. 

,M. 

J. 

.W. 



w. 
w. 

M. 

W. 

M. 

W. 
W. 
M. 
W. 
W. 
t M. 

W. 

M. 
W. 

W. 
W. 

M. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



831 

832 



833 
834 
835 
836 



837 
838 
839 
840 
841 



842 
843 

845 
846 

847 
848 
849 

850 

851 

852 
853 
854 

855 



856 
857 
858 

859 
860 



861 

862 



863 
864 



8 66 
867 
868 
869 
870 



Tucker 

Smoll 

Van Deursen 
S. Woodward* 
Bennett . 
Connor . 

Kerr . . 



C. A 
I. R. 
J. E. 
Geo. 
John 
T. C. 
James 

R. B. Gillie 

R. Moe 

G. S. French* . . 
C. W. Mitchell . 
L. D. Armstrong 
C. J. Becker . . . 
L. E. Holcomb . 

F. D. Reed .... 
H. J. Jackson . 
H. F. Holder . . 
Martin Andersen 
Harry D. Irwin 
Albert J. Carr . 
Geo. A. Reed* . 
Jas. Hamilton 

E. D. Beird .... 
Geo. T. Chant . 
Samuell Way . . . 
J. M. Forsman 
L. C. Wiley* . . . 

G. G. Moelaughlin 
Geo. M. Leathers 
W. G. Stowell . . . 
E. B. Lawton . . . 
Frank M. Miller . 

O. J. Joynt 

J. Maclaughlan* . 
Thos. Rankin* . . . 
H. E. Lindblade . 
B. F. Henrikson . 
G. B. Hanson . . . 
Chas. L. Wood . . . 

Chas. Olson 

J. F. Blakeslee . . 

N. J. Carey* 

N. A. Scott 

N. E. Murray 
Herman F. 



. ..W. M. 



N. J. Bollenbaugh. 
W. L. Shepard. Jr* 
R. C. Dyrenforth* 
R. A. Sempill . . . 
Albert Daers* 
William Gardner* 
Wm. P. Preble . . . 
G. A. Goetsch . . . 

J. Lindsay . . . 

B. Penderirnst . 

H. Crowell 

Hickox 

R. Skinner 

W. Zugswerdl 

L. Gardner . . . 
Albert IT. Mussing 
R. w. Phillips ... 



, s. w. 
J. w. 
W. M. 



. S. W. 
. J.W. 
.W. M. 



. S. W. 

J.W. 

W. M. 



. S. W. 
.W. M. 



. S. W. 
W. M. 



. S. W. 
.W. M. 
. J.W. 
.W. M. 
. J.W. 
.W. M. 



. S. W. 
W. M. 
. S. W. 
J.W. 
,W. M. 



. S. W. 
,W. M. 



Woeckendorf . . . 
J. W. 

s. w. 

,V. M. 
S. W. 
W. M. 
s. W. 
J. w. 

A\ M. 

s. W. 
J. W. 

,Y. M. 

s. W. 
.i. W. 
,V. M. 



*Proxy. 



172 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



Representatives of Lodges. 



NO. 



NAMES. 



871 


S. O. Hilbrant* . . 


..W. M. 


872 


W. J. Sailor 


. . " 




C. T. Stanner 


. . s. w. 


873 


E. C. Tellotson 


. .W. M. 




C. A. Luse 


. . s. w. 




J. H. Boyd 


. . J. w. 


874 


C. R. Van Winkle 


. .W. M. 


8 75 


Edward Beecroft . . 


" 




Chas. Cunnard .... 


. . J. w. 


876 


W. F. Bazner 


. .W. M. 




R. P. Johnson* . . . 


. . S. W. 




W. P Larsen* 


. . J. W. 


877 


John W. Costley . . 


. .W. M. 


878 


J. Scott Mathews . 


. . " 


879 


A. I. Weston 


. . " 




Thos. Quincy 


. . S. w. 




E. H. Cooke 


. . J. w. 


880 


W. J. Freckelton . . 


. .W. M. 




Otto Drews 


. . s. w. 




John Smith, Jr. ... 


. . J. w. 


881 


W. C. Stewart 


. .W. M. 


882 


W. J. Lamb 


. .W. M. 




Chas. H. Moss 


. . s. w. 




J. Norris 


. . J. w. 


883 


W. C. Harned 


..W. M. 


884 
885 


John Sampley* 

D. F. Rich man . . . 




886 


Carl Lorenzen 


" 


887 
888 


Walter B. Nolan . . 
Geo. Edwards 






W. R. Goodheart . . 


. . s. w. 




S. M. Fitch 


. . J. w. 


889 


Thos. Kerwin 


. .W. M. 




W. J. Weideman . . 


. . J. W. 


890 


D. F. Webster 


. .W. M. 


891 


Walter Beile 





NO. 



NAMES. 



892 

893 
894 

895 



896 

897 



898 
900 



901 



902 
903 
904 
905 
906 
907 



908 
909 
910 



J. Dutton, Jr W. 

E. A. Johnson S. 

Otto Tetting- J. 

J. O. Wade W. 

H. F. Sprague 

R. E. Walter S. 

Ben N. Dawney .... J. 
Henry Cohen W. 

D. S. Davidson S. 

B. L. Cohn J. 

J. C. Higgins W. 

J. A. Anderson 

A. W. Lemme S. 

N. Sweig J. 

Walter J. Baker* . . .W. 
R. H. Rockwood .... 

E. O. Jones S 

H. E. Henderson .... J. 

F. M, Glennon W. 

J. A. Freuend S. 

A. B. Gash J. 

E. T. Corwin . . . .W. 

L. Barber 

Elmer E. Farmer ... 
Franklin Miller 

C. F. Lamb 

H. Silverman 

Leo Michael* S. 

John Silverman* .... J. 

D. C. Hibbott W. 

O. L. Barks S. 

W. W. Sime J. 

L. E. Hamburg W. 

C. E. Schnaidt S. 

E. J. Feathen J. 

Geo. W. Lawrence . .W. 



M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 

W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 

W. 

w. 

M. 

W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 



W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W. 

M. 
W. 
W.. 

M. 



*Proxy. 



All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Geo. W. Cyrus, 
C. E. Grove, 
W. E. Hadley, 

The report of the Committee was adopted. 



Committee. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



173 



KEPORT— Committee on Mileage and Per D.em, 
Bro. W. F. Beck presented the report of the Committee 
on Mileage and Per Diem It was adopted. 

To the M.W. Grand Lodge of the State of Illinois, A.F, and A. Masons: 

Your Committee on Mileage and Per Diem would fraternally report 
that the following Grand Officers, Members of Committees, and Repre- 
sentatives, members of this Grand Lodge, are entitled to Mileage and Per 
Diem as set forth in the following pages : 

GRAND OFFICERS. 



NAMES. 


OFFICE. 


33 


bo 
d 


s 

u 


Total 


Alexander H. Bell 


M.W. Grand Master 


224 


$22 40 


$ 


$ 22 40 


A. B. Ashley 


R. W. Dep. Gr. Master . . . 




Delmar D . Darrah 


R. W. Sr. Gr. Warden 










Henry T. Burnap 


R. W. Jr . Gr. Warden 










Leroy A. Goddard 


R. W. Gr. Treasurer 










Isaac Cutter 


R. W. Gr. Secretary 

R.W. Gr. Chaplain 

R. W . Grand Orator . . 


241 

84 

185 

173 

246 

158 

234 

173 

263 

139 

186 

6 

5 

366 

252 

185 

6 


24 10 
8 40 
18 50 
17 30 

24 60 
15 80 
23 40 

17 30 
26 30 
13 90 

18 60 
60 
50 

36 60 

25 20 
18 50 

60 


"6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


24 10 


J. Webster Bailey 


14 40 


E.B.Rogers 


24 50 


Geo. A. Stadler 


W. Dep. Gr. Sec'y 

W. Gr. Pursuivant 

W. Grand Marshal 


23 30 


Frederick W. Froelich 

Louis Zinger 

W.O.Butler 


30 60 
21 80 


W. Gr. Stand. Bearer 

W. Gr. Sword Bearer 

W. Sr. Gr. Deacon 

W. Jr. Gr. Deacon 

W. Grand Steward 


29 40 


James M. Willard 


23 30 


Henry L. Whipple 


32 30 




19 90 




24 60 


H. S. Albin 


W. Grand Steward 


6 60 


C. S. Gurney 


Bro. Grand Tyler 


6 50 


W. H. Scott 


P. G. Master 

P. D. G. Master 

P. G. Sen. Warden 


42 60 


W. J. A. Delancy 


31 20 




24 50 


Jno. C Smith 


P. G. Master 


6 60 



R. W. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 



Harry W. Harvey 
R. R. Jampolis — 
Albert Roullier . . . 

David D. King 

Wm. H. Bied 

Edward Peterson 

Lewis Pickett 

Jay L. Brewster.. 
James M. Huff — 
John W. Oliver .. 
W. J. Emerson. .. 
James McCredie., 

W. C. Stilson 

Milton T. Booth... 
F. H.Bradley .... 

.]'. B. Fithian. '.'.'.'.'. 

N. T. Stevens 

L. E. Rockwood. . 
JohnC. Weis 



DISTRICTS. 



1st District. 

2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 
10th 
11th 
12th 
13th 
14th 
15th 
16th 
17th 
18th 
19th 
20th 
21st 



1 

1 

8 

4 

12 

35 

78 

138 

91 

37 

121 

152 

130 



37 
69 

no 
150 



! 70 

70 

10 

10 

80 

40 

1 20 

3 50 

7 80 

13 so 

9 10 

3 70 

12 10 
15 20 

13 00 



3 70 

16 90 

n oo 

15 oo 



o 

$ 6 70 
6 70 
6 10 
6 10 
6 80 

6 40 

7 20 
9 50 

18 80 

19 80 
15 10 

9 ;o 
is 10 
SI 21 
19 oo 



9 ;o 

12 90 

i; oo 

81 oo 



174 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



R. VV. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS.— Continued. 



NAMES. 


DISTRICTS. 


03 
<V 

s 


bo 
d 

<V 


s 

s 

U 

a. 




EH 


C. L. Gregory 


22d District 

23d 

24th 

25th 

26th 

27th 

28th 

29th 

30th 

31st 

32d 

33d 

34th 

35th 

36th 

37th 

38th 

39th 

40th 

41st 

42d 

43d 

44th 

45th 

46th 

47th 

48th 

49th 

50th 


176 
171 
227 
157 
141 
124 
137 
187 
185 
215 
263 
263 
235 
224 
220 
202 
158 
186 


$17 60 

17 10 

22 70 
15 70 

14 10 

12 40 

13 70 

18 70 
18 50 

21 51 
26 30 
26 30 

23 50 

22 40 

23 00 
20 20 

15 80 
18 60 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


$23 60 


Emerson Clark 


23 10 


D. H. Glass 

L. W. Lawton 


28 70 
21 70 


H. M. Palmer 

C. L. Sandusky 


20 10 

18 40 


Wilson P. Jones 

N. M. Mesnard 


19 70 
24 70 


S. S. Breese 


24 50 


C. P. Ross 


27 50 


W. W. Watson 


32 30 


Emmet Howard 


32 30 


R. M. Riggs 


29 50 


C.H. Burgdorf 

D. W. Starr 

Chas. G. Young 


28 40 
28 CO 
26 20 


J. E. Jeffers 


21 80 


H. Gassaway 


ii 60 








242 

259 

281) 


'24*30 
25 90 

28 00 


"6' 
6 
6 




Anthony Doherty 


30 20 


Enos Johnson 


31 90 


Geo. S. Caughlan 


34 00 






J. R. Ennis 


272 
297 
326 
330 
373 


27 20 
29 70 

32 60 

33 CO 
37 30 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


33 20 


I. A. Poster 


35 70 


W. D. Abney 


38 60 


W. H. Peak 


39 00 


Joseph K. West 


43 30 



COMMITTEES. 



NAMES. 


9 


i 


A 
S 

u 


O 


APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. 

Monroe C. Crawford 

A. W. West 


330 
173 
126 
249 
160 

172 
150 
305 
173 
154 


$33 00 

17 30 
12 60 
24 90 

16 00 

17 20 
15 00 
30 50 
17 30 
15 40 


$30 
30 
30 
30 
30 

20 
20 
20 
20 
20 


$ 63 00 
47 30 


Geo. R. Smith 


42 60 


H.H.Montgomery 


54 90 




46 00 


CHARTERED LODGES 


37 20 


Chas. F. Hitchcock 


35 00 


S. M. Schoemann 


50 50 
37 30 




35 40 


CORR ESPONDENCE. 















1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



17. 



committees— Continued. 



G. W. Cyrus. . 
W. E. Hadley. 
C. E. Groves.. 



CREDENTIALS. 



Nelson N. Lampert, 

S. O. Spring 

Thos. A. Stevens .. . 



GRAND MASTERS ADDRESS. 



J. M. Hannum. 

Jas. E. Wooters 

H. L. Browning 

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION. 

I. H. Todd 

John J ohnston 

H. C. Mitchell 

M. Bates Iott 

J ohn W. Hamilton 



H. A. Snell. 
Chester E. Allen. 

Edward Cook 

Wm. B. Wright . 



MASONIC JURISPRUDENCE. 



W. F. Beck 

G. A. Lackens., 
H. T. Goddard. 



MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. 



C. H. Thompson . 
C. N. Rambleton 
S. W. Eldred 



OBITUARIES. 



Ben Hagle 

F. E. Baldwin. 
J. E. Wheat... 



PETITIONS. 



O. E. Tandy, 
J. O. Clifford. 



R. F. Morrow . .. 
A. H. Scroggin. . 

S. S. Borden 

Chas. H. Martin. 
Chas. S. DeHart 



RAILROADS AND TRANSPORTATION. 



TO EXAMINE VISITORS. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 
TRUSTEES ILLINOIS MASONIC HOME. 

Henry W. Berks 

James A. Stee.e 

Geo. M. Moulton 

OwenScott 

Robert J. Daley 

Thomas E. Miller 



TO PREPARE LAWS FOR NEW LODGES. 

A. B. Ashley , 

D. D. Darrah 

H. T. Burnap 







a 




<u 






be 






ci 


b 


<D 


V 
















S 


a 


& 


241 


$24 10 


$20 


286 


28 60 


20 


175 


17 50 


20 


10 


l on 


20 


150 


15 00 


20 


4 


40 


20 


113 


11 30 


20 


224 


22 40 


20 


281 


28 10 


20 


281 


28 10 


30 


1 


10 


30 


308 


30 80 


30 


12 


1 20 


30 


124 


12 40 


30 


231 


23 10 


20 


163 


16 30 


20 


2 


20 


20 


199 


19 90 


20 


231 


23 10 


30 


218 


21 80 


30 


249 


24 90 


30 


365 


36 50 


20 


251 


25 10 


20 


263 


26 30 


20 


228 


22 80 


20 


215 


21 50 


20 


110 


11 10 


20 


215 


21 50 


20 


25 


2 50 


20 


. 20r 


20 70 


15 


110 


11 00 


15 


7 


70 


15 


226 


22 60 


15 


238 


23 80 


15 


128 


12 80 


20 


176 


17 60 


2d 


1 


10 


20 


173 


17 80 


20 


5 


50 


20 


1 


10 


20 


15 


1 50 


20 


126 


12 60 


20 


259 


25 90 


20 



$ 44 10 
48 60 
37 50 



21 00 
35 00 
20 40 



31 30 
42 40 

48 10 

58 10 

30 10 
60 80 

31 20 
42 40 



43 10 
36 30 
20 20 
39 90 



53 10 
51 80 

54 90 

56 50 

45 10 

46 30 

42 80 
41 50 
31 00 



41 50 
22 50 



35 70 
26 00 
15 70 

37 60 

38 so 



S3 s0 
b7 60 
20 10 
;;; 30 
20 50 
20 10 



21 50 
82 80 

45 90 



176 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



Bodley 

Equality 

Harmony 

Springfield. 
Friendship. . 

Macon 

Rushville 

St. John's 

Warren 

Peoria 

Temperance. 

Macomb 

Clinton 

Hancock 

Cass 

St. Clair , 

Franklin 

Piasa 

Pekin 

Mt. Vernon.. 

Oriental 

Barry 

Charleston. ., 
Kavanaugh. . 
Monmouth.. . 
Olive Branch 

Herman 

Occidental... 

Mt. Joliet 

Bloomington 

Hardin 

Griggsville. . 

Temple 

Caledonia . .. 

Unity 

Cambridge. .. 

Carrollton 

Mt. Moriah. . . 
Benevolent.. 

Jackson 

Washington. 

Trio 

Fraternal.... 
New Boston. 

Belvidere 

Lacon 

Benton 

Euclid , 

Pacific 

Acacia 

Eureka 

Central 

Rockton 

Roscoe 

Mt. Nebo 

Prairie 

Waukegan.. . 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



S. O. Pearce 

F. O. Sawyer 

J. S. Hackett 

Louis M. Myers 

James O. Barley 

Herbert C. Bush 

Thos. E. Bottenb^re . 
Frederick E. Hoberg 

R. B. Hooker 

JohnF. Johnson 

N. C. Gochenour 

S. P. Odeuweller 

John Boden 

R. C. Williams 

John W. Fagan 

W. A. Hough 

I. G. Seitz 

Geo T. Davis 

Chas. Zoeller 

Wainwright Davis... 
Franklin C. Catlin ... 

O. K. Garrett 

O. B. Root 

Edward A. Laign 

J. B. C. Lutz 

W. Y. Ludwig 

Henry C. Mueller — 
Walter E. Speekman 

J. W. Brac<way 

Frank C. Fisher 

John A. Bond 

John Craven, Jr 

W. H. Coleman, Jr . . . 

F. M. Stringer 

L. C Caldwell 

Gust Eastland 

Robert E. Runnill. ... 

R. E. Gifford 

Wm. A. Schmidt 

Wm. Taylor 

L. T. Phillips 

J. W. Howder 

Alonzo T. Pepher 

C. L. Willits 

Max M. Lucas 

Lewis T. Wood 

J. E. Webster 

Newton J. Wagner... 

L. A. Jackson 

Elmer Tregoy 

Clark H. Smith 

Geo. M. Weakley 

C. B. Williamson 

C. A. Ransom 

ChasH. Woods 

J. B. Garrison 

L. A. Hendee 





be 


A 


w 


d 


n 


<u 


0) 
















3 


3 


Ph 


263 


$ 26 30 


$6 


307 


30 70 


6 


215 


21 50 


6 


185 


18 50 


6 


98 


9 80 


6 


173 


17 30 


6 


227 


22 70 


6 


100 


10 00 


6 


310 


31 00 


6 


150 


15 00 


6 


230 


23 00 


6 


203 


20 30 


6 


188 


18 80 


6 


238 


23 80 


6 


225 


22 50 


4 


295 


29 50 


6 


259 


25 90 


6 


257 


25 70 


6 


158 


15 80 


6 


274 


27 40 


6 


1 


10 


6 


263 


26 30 


6 


182 


18 20 


6 


144 


14 40 


4 


179 


17 90 


6 


124 


12 40 


6 


263 


26 30 


6 


84 


8 40 


6 


37 


3 70 


6 


126 


12 60 


6 


235 


22 50 


6 


246 


24 60 


6 


150 


15 00 


6 


368 


36 80 


6 


36 


3 60 


6 


154 


15 40 


6 


249 


24 90 


6 


239 


23 90 


6 


238 


23 80 


6 


195 


19 50 


6 


277 


27 70 


6 


164 


16 40 


6 


146 


14 60 


6 


189 


18 90 


6 


78 


7 80 


6 


128 


12 80 


6 


307 


30 70 


6 


29 


2 90 


6 


168 


16 80 


6 


99 


9 90 


6 


170 


17 00 


6 


185 


18 50 


6 


102 


10 20 


6 


86 


8 60 


6 


224 


22 40 


6 


160 


16 00 


6 


36 


3 60 


6 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



Ill 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



Scott 

Whitehall 

Vitruvius 

DeWitt 

Mitchell 

Kaskaskia 

Mt. Pulaski 

Havana 

Fellowship 

Jerusalem Temple . 

Metropolis 

Stewart 

Toulon 

Perry 

Samuel H. Davis. . . 

Excelsior 

Taylor 

Edwardsville 

Astoria 

Rockford 

Magnolia 

Lewistown 

Winchester 

Lancaster 

Versailles 

Trenton , 

Lebanon 

Jonesboro 

Bureau , 

Robert Burns 

Marcelline 

Rising Sun 

Vermont 

Elgin 

Waverly 

Mound 

Oquawka 

Cedar : 

Greenup 

Empire 

Antioch 

Raleigh 

Greenfield 

Marion 

Golconda 

Mackinaw 

Marshall 

Sycamore 

Lima 

Hutsonville 

Polk 

Marengo 

Geneva 

Olney 

Garden City 

Ames 

Richmond 

DeKalb 

A. W. Rawson 

Lee Center 

Clayton 

Bloomfield 

Effingham 

Vienna 

Bunker Hill 



79 

80 

81 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

95 

96 

97 

- 98 

99 

100 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

122 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

144 

145 

146 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



J. Q. Roane 

J. H. Winters 

Adam Metzer 

Sherman S.Hull 

E. F. Bartle 

Wm. M. Schuwerk 

H. W.Schafer 

C.E. Walsh 

A. M.Edwards 

H. D. Hamper 

John M. Boecourt 

Jos. Dobbs 

Wm. E. Nixon 

C. F. Beatty 

Gregor Thompson 

Ray L. Burkhart 

L. J. Kem 

Cyrus A. Geer 

A. E. Scott 

Richard F. Locke 

Perry Dakin 

Grier Hanson 

Joseph K. Gordon 

John I. Maple 

H.T.Williams , 

James S. Anderson , 

Edwin P. Baker 

W. A. Rendleman 

H. L.Parker 

A.R. Wvcoff 

F. P.Taylor 

C. J. Wrightman 

Chas.Jenkins 

W. H. Newton 

Newton B. Rohrer 

C. N.Miller .' 

W. S. Wilson 

M.B.Hull 

J. W.Ozier 

J. F. Kaylor 

John A. Thain 

W.P. Cable 

V. N.Kincald 

J. M. Morrow 

J. H. Benham 

RoyH. Peffcr 

J. R. Burnett 

A. E. Hammerschmidt — 
A. K.Cony 

C. G. Pearce 

O. J. Davis 

D. E. Loomis 

C. A. Lindahl 

A. T. Telford 

J.H. Wylie 

C. E. Simington 

A. M. Gibbs 

C. J. L. Borine 

E. R. Kidder 

F. M. Blowers 

J. L. Tarbox 

H. E. Schmitster 

W. M. Stewart 

Thos. E. Gillespie 

E. R. Welch 



262 
240 
30 
148 
290 
313 
169 



37 
366 

159 
144 
252 

96 
114 
134 
267 
218 

87 
123 
194 
235 
164 
246 
278 
286 
330 
104 
193 
271 

46 
211 

37 
210 
202 
202 

62 
194 
158 

55 
304 
252 
249 
372 
146 
177 

52 
276 
197 
305 

66 

36 

231 

1 

120 

63 

58 
101 

95 
242 
147 
199 
310 
250 



$26 20 

24 00 
3 00 

14 80 
29 00 

31 30 
16 90 

18 80 

32 60 

3 70 
36 60 

15 90 

14 40 

25 20 
9 60 

11 40 

13 40 

26 70 
21 80 

8 70 

12 30 

19 40 

23 50 

16 40 

24 60 

27 80 

28 60 

33 00 
10 40 

19 30 
27 10 

4 60 
21 10 

3 70 
21 00 

20 20 
20 20 

6 20 
19 40 

15 80 

5 50 
30 40 

25 20 

24 90 
37 20 

14 60 

17 70 

5 20 
27 60 
19 70 
30 50 

6 60 
3 60 

23 10 

10 

12 00 

6 30 

5 80 

10 10 

9 50 

84 20 

14 70 

19 90 

34 00 

25 00 | 



$32 20 

30 00 
9 00 

20 80 
35 00 

37 30 
22 90 

24 80 

38 60 
9 70 

42 60 

21 90 

20 40 

31 20 

15 60 
17 40 

17 40 

32 70 

25 80 
14 70 

18 30 
25 40 

29 50 

22 40 

30 60 

33 80 

34 60 

39 00 

16 40 

25 30 
33 10 

10 60 
27 10 

9 70 
27 00 

26 20 
26 20 
12 20 
25 40 

21 80 

11 50 
36 40 

31 20 
30 90 

43 20 
20 60 

23 70 

11 20 
33 60 
25 70 
36 50 

12 60 
9 60 

29 10 
6 10 

18 00 
12 30 
11 80 
16 10 
16 50 

30 SO 
20 70 
86 90 
40 00 

31 00 



178 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



Fidelity 

Clay 

Russell 

Alpha 

Delavan 

Urbana 

McHenry 

Kewanee 

Waubansia 

Virden 

Hope 

Edward Dobbins 

Atlanta 

Star in the East.. 

Milford 

Nunda 

Evergreen 

Girard 

Wayne 

Cherry Valley.. . . 

Lena 

Matteson 

Mendota 

Staunton 

Illinois Central... 

Wabash 

Moweaqua 

Germania 

Meridian 

Abingdon 

Mystic Tie 

Cyrus — 

Dundee 

Farmington 

Herrick 

Freedom 

La Harpe. 

Louisville 

King Solomon's.. 

Homer 

Sheba 

Centralia 

Lavely 

Flora 

Corinthian 

Fairfield 

Tamaroa 

Wilmington 

Wm. B. Warren. . 

Logan 

Cleveland 

Shipman 

Ipava 

Gillespie 

Newton 

Mason 

New Salem 

Oakland 

Mahomet 

Leroy 

Geo. Washington 

Pana 

Columbus 

Lovington 

Manchester 



152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
164 
165 
166 



170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
182 
183 
185 
187 
188 
190 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
199 
200 
201 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
226 
227 
228 
229 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



O. P. Erwin 

O. J. Hagebush 

D. H. Bowen 

Chas. Burkhardt 

A. R. Patzer 

Benjamin Bing 

W. F. Gallaher 

L. L. Priestman 

P. E. Statefeld 

B.C. Coor 

S. E.Grigg 

J. A. E. Black 

F. C. Bowden 

Wm.E. Jaycox 

E. W.Scott 

Wm. W Roberts .... 

Jos. M. Brown 

J. D. Smith 

J. B. Hollibaugh 

Hosea B. Kezar 

D. M. DeGraff 

Lawrence Sobson . . . 

E. G. McMackin 

Jas. W. Donaldson .. 

F. L. Doty 

Ernest Chamberlain 

Jno. L. Klump 

Geo. E. Kochler 

Geo. S. Wiley 

A. D. Underwood 

W. F. Schell, Jr 

J. C. Mills 

A. Winteringham... 
A. A. Luckey 

G. A. Starkweather. 
Gustave J. Malaise.. 

Geo. E. Campbell 

Alsie N. Tolliver 

N. H. Close 

Geo. H. Astell... 

W. O. Pape 

Richard H. Harn 

S. J. McKinney 

C. E. Hemphill 

Chas. F. Preston 

Nicholas M. Powell . . 

A. L. Linn 

John C. Whitmen. . . . 

Geo. R. Lundy 

Albert Brown 

Wm. K. Spieck 

Chas. N. Bullman . .. 

B. S. Diehl 

J. N. English 

Hi Byron Roebuck . . 

Edw. Ruffner 

S. G. Chamie 

Frank S. Winkler... 

P. O. Jahr 

J. E. Mackay 

J. S. Daily 

Chas. E. Barnett 

J. Y. Lawless 

W. B. Shirey 

Samuel R. Loar 







a 






<v 








be 






w 


ri 


U 


.— < 


<u 


O) 


u 








<v 


o 


S 


3 


Oh 


H 


240 


$24 00 


$6 


$30 00 


267 


26 78 


6 


32 70 


135 


13 50 


6 


19 50 


163 


16 30 


6 


22 30 


157 


15 70 


6 


21 70 


130 


13 00 


6 


19 00 


46 


4 60 


6 


10 60 


131 


13 10 


6 


19 10 


1 


10 


6 


6 10 


207 


20 70 


6 


26 70 


299 


29 90 


6 


35 90 


225 


22 50 


6 


28 50 


146 


14 60 


6 


20 60 


87 


8 70 


6 


14 70 


88 


8 80 


6 


14 80 


43 


4 30 


6 


10 30 


114 


11 40 


9 


17 40 


211 


21 10 


6 


27 10 


152 


15 20 


6 


21 20 


84- 


8 40 


6 


14 40 


126 


12 60 


6 


18 60 


37 


3 70 


6 


9 70 


84 


8 40 


6 


14 40 


245 


24 50 


6 


30 50 


95 


9 50 


6 


15 50 


180 


18 00 


6 


24 00 


186 


18 60 


6 


24 60 


2 


20 


6 


6 20 


72 


7 20 


6 


13 20 


173 


17 30 


6 


23 30 


110 


11 00 


6 


17 00 


128 


12 80 


6 


18 80 


48 


4 80 


6 


10 80 


169 


16 90 


6 


22 90 


224 


22 40 


6 


28 40 


75 


7 50 


6 


13 50 


234 


23 40 


6 


29 40 


228 


22 80 


6 


28 80 


257 


25 70 


6 


31 70 


143 


14 30 


6 


20 30 


266 


26 60 


6 


32 60 


252 


25 20 


6 


31 20 


173 


17 30 


6 


23 30 


236 


23 60 


6 


29 60 


76 


7 60 


6 


13 60 


257 


25 70 


6 


31 70 


280 


28 00 


6 


34 00 


53 


5 30 


6 


11 30 


1 


10 


6 


6 10 


156 


15 60 


6 


21 60 


1 


10 


6 


6 10 


238 


23 80 


6 


29 80 


203 


20 30 


4 


24 30 


240 


24 00 


6 


30 00 


214 


21 40 


6 


27 40 


211 


21 10 


6 


27 10 


251 


25 10 


6 


31 10 


166 


16 60 


6 


22 60 


141 


14 10 


6 


20 10 


135 


13 50 


6 


19 50 


134 


13 40 


6 


19 40 


202 


20 20 


6 


26 20 


250 


25 00 


6 


31 00 


168 


16 80 


6 


22 80 


232 


23 20 


6 


29 20 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



179 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



New Haven — 

Wyanet 

Farmers 

Blandinsville... 

DuQuoin , 

Dallas City 

Charter Oak 

Cairo 

Black Hawk 

Mt. Carmel 

Western Star... 

Shekinah 

Galva 

Horicon 

Greenville 

El Paso 

Rob Morris 

Golden Gate 

Hibbard 

Robinson 

Hey worth , 

Aledo 

Avon Harmony . 

Aurora 

Donnelson 

Warsaw 

Mattoon 

Amon 

Channahon 

Illinois 

Franklin Grove. 

Vermilion 

Kingston 

La Prairie 

Paris.. 

Wheaton 

Levi Lusk 

Blaney 

Carmi 

Miners 

Byron 

Milton 

Elizabeth 

Accordia 

Jo Daviess 

Neoga 

Kansas 

Brooklyn 

Meteor 

Catlin 

Plymouth 

De Soto 

Genoa 

Wataga 

Chenoa, 

Dills 

Quincy 

Benjamin.. 

Wauconda 

Hinckley 

Durand 

Raven 

Onarga 

W. C. Hobbs 

T. J. Pickett .... 



230 
231 

232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
257 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
282 



286 
287 
288 
291 
292 
295 
296 



801 
302 
803 
805 

306 
I 307 



J. H. Gaddy 

H. A. Gramer 

H. W. Halefleld 

W. A. Griggsby 

J. W. Hemenway 

A. P. Layton 

P. J. Rose 

W.F.Gibson 

O. C. McCartnev 

W. A. Stansfleld 

Frank M. Browne .. 
Frank M. Caldwell.. 

V. A. Weyren 

J. E. Barber 

Edgar E. Cox 

Chester F. Curtiss. . . 

H. A. Millard 

Jas. A. Rose 

S. G. Brown 

F. E. Lathrop 

L. T. Rutledge 

Elmer E. Bower 

Geo. A. Tompkins . .. 

Walter Lintott 

A. M. Sharp 

C. C. Crawford 

G. N. Todd 

C. W.Cardiff 

Alfred A. Meredith . 
O. J. Zimmerman . . . 

E. P. Harrison 

Albertus Dickson 

L. M. Morrison 

Everett E. Wolfe 

M. J. Gallaher 

Arthur L. Perrottet 

S. P. Prescott 

S. Wm. Polkey 

T. H.Land 

S.J. Hughlett 

J. M. Heald 

Coston Clemmons. .. 
Richard F. Taylor... 

Ernst Keppler 

John H. Thornton. .. 

W. R. Whitney 

Frank S. Anderson. . 
Floyd B. Johnson . . . 

Thos. McNiece 

Walter T. Boggers.. 

R. L. Cloud 

Marian Kelley 

Elmer A. Soners 

Hamilton Taylor 

LeRoy A. Knapp 

W. E. Downey 

F. W. Chumbley 

Jont Ensminger 

Martin E. Fuller 

L. E. Davis 

S. J.Randall 

L. P. Voss 

Ira W. Furby 

Julius L. Kramer — 
George D. Bell 



297 
111 
373 

228 
288 
222 
231 
365 
243 
249 
128 
308 
139 

75 
248 
117 
113 
186 
246 
205 
137 
176 
183 

37 
245 
248 
172 
139 

55 
150 

88 
142 
265 
236 
160 

25 

92 

1 

282 

165 

83 
259 
337 
4 
138 
184 
174 

82 

56 
129 
222 
302 

59 
155 
102 
250 
263 
241 

40 

57 
104 

44 

85 
131 
102 



$29 70 

11 10 
37 30 
22 80 
28 80 

22 20 

23 10 
36 50 

24 30 
24 90 

12 80 
30 80 

13 90 

7 50 
24 80 
11 70 

11 30 
18 60 
24 60 
20 50 
13 70 

17 60 

18 30 

3 70 
24 50 

24 80 

17 20 

13 90 
5 50 

15 00 

8 80 

14 20 
26 50 

23 60 

16 00 
2 50 

9 20 
10 

28 20 

16 50 
8 30 

25 90 
33 70 

40 
13 80 

18 40 

17 40 
8 20 
5 60 

12 90 
22 20 
30 20 

5 90 

15 50 
10 20 
25 00 
20 30 

24 10 

4 00 

5 70 
10 40 

4 40 

5 50 
L3 io 

i«) :o 



$35 70 

17 10 
43 30 
28 80 
34 80 

28 20 

29 10 
42 50 

30 30 
30 90 

18 80 
36 80 
17 90 

13 50 
30 80 

17 70 
15 30 
24 60 
30 00 
26 50 

19 70 

23 60 

24 50 
9 70 

30 50 

30 80 

23 20 

19 90 
11 50 

21 00 

14 80 

20 20 
32 50 

29 60 

22 00 
8 50 

15 20 
6 10 

34 20 

22 50 
14 30 

31 90 
39 70 

6 40 
19 80 

24 40 

23 40 
14 20 
11 00 

18 Q0 
28 20 
36 20 
11 oo 

21 50 
10 20 
31 60 
3,2 30 

30 10 

10 00 

11 70 
K. 40 
10 40 
14 50 
10 10 

25 :o 



180 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



LODGE 



REPRESENTATIVE. 





: I 




Ofi 


w 


d 


<L> 


<v 










§ 


3 


1 


$ 10 


62 


6 20 


3 


30 


1 


10 


173 


17 30 


195 


19 50 


26 


2 60 


99 


9 90 


226 


22 60 


164 


16 40 


70 


7 00 


124 


12 40 


184 


18 40 


68 


6 80 


306 


30 60 


215 


21 50 


147 


14 70 


259 


25 90 


150 


If. 00 


185 


18 50 


236 


23 60 


150 


15 00 


364 


36 40 


151 


15 10 


316 


31 60 


193 


19 30 


273 


27 30 


283 


28 30 


108 


10 80 


122 


12 20 


229 


22 90 


137 


13 70 


213 


21 30 


93 


9 30 


193 


19 30 


98 


9 80 


270 


27 00 


201 


20 10 


256 


25 60 


262 


26 20 


62 


6 20 


44 


4 40 


149 


14 90 


302 


30 20 


239 


23 90 


163 


16 30 


108 


10 80 


153 


15 30 


158 


15 80 


160 


16 00 


290 


29 00 


166 


16 60 


74 


7 40 


246 


24 60 


67 


6 70 



Ashlar 

Harvard 

Dearborn ..... 

Kilwinning 

Ionic 

York 

Palatine 

Abraham Jonas 
J. L. Anderson . 

Doric 

Creston 

Dunlap 

Windsor 

Orient 

Harrisburg 

Industry 

Altona 

Mt. Erie 

Tuscola 

Tyrian 

Sumner 

Schiller 

New Columbia. . 

Oneida 

Saline 

Kedron 

Full Moon 

Summerneld 

Wenona 

Milledgeville ... 

N. D.Morse 

Sidney 

Russellville 

Sublette 

Fairview 

Tarbolton 

Kinderhook 

Ark and Anchor 

Marine 

Hermitage 

Orion 

Blackberry 

Prince ville 

Douglas 

Noble 

Horeb 

Tonica 

Bement 

Areola 

Oxford 

Jefferson 

Newman 

Livingston 

Chambersburg . 

Shabbona 

Aroma 

Payson 

Liberty 

Gill 

LaMoille 

Waltham 

Mississippi 

Bridgeport 

El Dara 

Kankakee 



310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
316 
318 
319 
3-20 
321 
322 
323 
325 
327 
330 
331 
332 



335 
336 
337 
339 
340 
341 
342 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
353 
354 
355 
356 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 



371 
373 

374 

378 
379 
380 
382 
383 
384 
385 



J. Reynoldstein.. . 
W. C. Willington . 
Edward R. Roe .. . 
Albert S. Groshon 

R. C. Peck; 

T.W.Richards.... 
H. H. Pahlman.... 
Frank F. Butzow . 

H. M. Holmes 

Geo. W. Flood 

Jos. W. Shaw 

I. D. Woodford.... 

R. W. Turner 

N. A. Honge 

A. G. Abney 

W. C. McKamy.... 

A. L. Roby 

Jerry Brink 

C. G. Stovall 

J. L. Taylor 

Geo. R. Stout 

Godfrey Wys 

J. R. T. Fitch 

H. J. Sawyn 

Henry Terry 

J. M. Wiswell 

I. C. Ducan 

Chas. T. Lang 

C. H. Hiswald 

Ray W. Surstine . 

V.I. Ball 

John G. Raymond 
W. G. McClure ... 

A. P. Jewel 

C. D. Snydam 

John F. Gondy 

A. C.Bancroft 

Geo. W. Jones 

Wesley Stone 

Joseph White 

A. J. Holmes 

SamC. Peck 

A. H. Sloan. 

L. J. Scheve 

Jas. Smith 

C. A. Vance 

Ray Richardson.. 
Thos. J.Tucker... 
J. A. Weach 

F. A. Gibson 

G. S. Brown 

J. W. Hanners — 
W.J.Drew........ 

S. J. Hobbs 

M. Bloomingdale . 

O. L. Day 

Jacob HiDckle 

E. W. Pond 

Thos. Dodswortn . 
Chas. B. Stauffer . 
John C. Brown — 

W. A. Bristol 

C. A. Cullison 

W. F. Reynolds... 
Gen. J. Wohn 



61 

278 

28:? 

223 

92 

94 

138 

229 

260 

56 



6 10 


6 


27 80 


6 


28 30 


6 


22 30 


6 


9 20 


6 


9 40 


6 


13 80 


6 


22 90 


6 


26 00 


6 


5 6U 


6 I 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



181 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



REPRESENTATIVE. 






Ashmore 

Tolono 

Oconee 

Blair 

Jersey ville 

Muddy Point... 

Shiloh 

Kinmundy 

Buda 

Odell 

Kishwaukee ... 
Mason City. ... 

Batavia. 

Ramsey 

Bethalto 

Stratton 

Thos. J. Turner 

Mithra 

Hesperia 

Bollen 

Evening Star.. 

Lawn Ridge 

Paxton 

Freeburg 

Reynoldsburg . 

Oregon 

Washburn 

Landmark 

Lanark 

Exeter 

Scottville 

Red Bud 

Sunbeam 

Chebanse 

Kendrick 

Summit 

Murray ville 

Annawan 

Makanda 

Philo 

Chicago 

Camargo 

Sparland 

Casey 

Hamshire 

Cave-in-Rock .. 
Chesterfield.... 

Watseka 

S. D. Monroe. .. 

Yates City 

Mendon 

Loami 

Bromwell 

New Hartford. 

Maroa 

Irving 

Nokomis ...:... 
Blazing Star. .. 
Jeffersonville.. 

Plainview 

Tremont 

Palmyra 

Denver 

Huntsville 

Cobden 



391 
392 
393 
394 

396 
397 



401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
408 
4i)9 
410 
411 
412 
414 
415 
416 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
436 
437 
440 
441 
442 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
453 
451 
455 
456 
458 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 



J. G. Dudly 

Justin P. Crawford. 
J. W. Heckethorn . . 

G. F. Ballard 

C. W.Johns 

L. F. Beals 

IraS. Geft 

John W. Doolen 

T. A. Zink 

John L. Tombaugh . 

F. W. Stark 

J. F. Rissinger 

Frank G. Downs — 
Mason V. Carter — 



178 
137 
209 
1 
260 
183 

80 
229 
117 

82 

62 
172 

b8 

219 

H.L.Windsor S61 



Oliver Sonder. 

August H. Bulge 

Chas. Oestrich 

Frank Sturgess 

Silas Wait 

C. A. R. Stabeck 

Grant Burdick 

H. B. Henderson. 

L. G. Joseph 

H. C. McCay 

John Nugent 

Chas. H. Ireland .... 

JobnH. Riddel 

J. R. Snively 

W. H. Sappington 

Jas.B. Ogg 

John J. Fox 

D. M. Baird 

Wm. O. Brown 

Lee F. Marton 

C.C.Nye 

C.C. Self 

Prank W. Ole 

George Granger 

John Fife 

Sidney S. Pollack..., 

Fred Ebel 

T. Van Antwerp 

Ralph M. Brook 

Ed. T. Crack 

|C. A. Okevson , 

E. C. Harper 

Jas. P. Baily 

E. H. Mills 

T. J. Kightlinger 

Jacob Funk 

N. W. Colburn 

W. H. Mellharn 

Geo. N. Ellis 

Chas J. Spooner 

C. E. Padgitt 

Joseph H Weinstein, 

G. W. Erwin 

W. E. Margan 

W.J. Dohahu 

R. L. Smith 

C. E. Wheeler 

W. E. Scott 

John Melvin 

H. D. Lawrence 



166 

1 

2 

1 

137 

109 

163 

103 

303 

334 

91 
127 
4 
120 
232 
223 
318 

52 

64 
248 
177 
227 
152 
316 
152 
1 
156 
130 
186 

51 
333 
233 

77 
217 
164 
263 
199 
193 
262 
157 
233 
224 
332 
2*1 
234 
153 
221 
247 
234 
S2S 



$17 80 
13 70 

20 90 
10 

26 00 
18 30 
8 00 

22 90 

11 70 

8 20 
6 20 

17 20 
3 80 

21 90 
26 10 
16 60 

10 

20 

10 

13 70 

10 90 

16 30 
10 30 

30 30 
33 40 

9 10 

12 70 
40 

12 00 

23 20 

22 30 

31 80 

5 20 

6 40 

24 80 

17 70 

22 70 
15 20 

31 60 
15 20 

10 

15 60 

13 00 

18 60 
5 10 

33 30 

23 30 

7 70 

21 70 

16 40 
26 30 

19 90 
19 30 
26 20 
15 70 
23 30 

22 40 
33 20 

25 10 

23 40 
15 30 

22 10 

24 rO 

23 40 

32 80 



$23 80 
19 70 
24 90 
6 10 
32 00 
24 30 
14 00 

28 90 

17 70 

14 20 
12 20 
23 20 

9 80 

27 90 

32 10 
22 60 

6 10 
6 20 
6 10 
19 70 
16 90 

22 30 
16 30 

36 30 
39 40 

15 10 

18 70 
6 40 

18 00 

29 20 

28 30 

37 80 

11 20 

12 40 

30 80 

23 70 

28 70 
21 20 
37 60 
21 20 

6 10 

21 60 

19 00 

24 60 
11 10 
39 30 

29 30 

13 70 

27 70 

22 40 

33 30 

25 90 
25 30 
32 20 
21 70 
29 30 

28 40 
39 20 
SI 10 

27 40 
21 80 

28 10 
80 70 
c.) 40 
88 80 



182 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



LODGE. 


NO. 


REPRESE NT ATIVES 


3 


V 

ho 
re 

S 


s 

u 

<v 


73 

o 




467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
478 
479 
481 
482 
484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
491 
492 
493 
495 
496 
497 
498 
500 
501 
502 
503 
501 
505 
506 
508 
509 
510 
512 
514 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
532 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 


E. O. WiLloughby 


180 
118 
141 
114 

49 

30 
258 
295 
239 
164 
3 
137 

52 
110 
214 
244 
244 
326 
242 
212 
181 

36 
204 
318 
210 
305 
316 
185 
145 
153 
244 
281 

74 

76 
3 
242 
258 
126 
128 
178 
231 
185 
191 
329 
186 

37 
194 

12 

213 

1 

105 

51 
283 
172 

84 

72 
211 
191 
164 

48 
142 

33 

97 

9 

195 


$18 00 
11 80 
14 10 
11 40 

4 90 
3 00 

25 80 

29 50 

23 90 

16 40 
30 

13 70 

5 20 

11 00 
21 40 

24 40 
24 40 
32 60 
24 20 
21 20 
18 10 

3 60 

20 40 
31 80 

21 00 

30 50 

31 60 
18 50 

14 50 

15 30 
24 40 
28 10 

7 40 

7 60 
30 

24 20 

25 80 

13 60 

12 80 

17 80 
23 10 

18 50 

19 10 

32 90 

18 60 

3 70 

19 40 
1 20 

21 30 
10 
10 50 
5 10 
28 30 
17 20 

8 40 
7 20 

21 10 
19 10 
16 40 

4 80 

14 20 
3 30 

9 70 
90 

19 50 


$6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


$24 00 
17 80 




T. W. Nixon 




Warley C. Smith 


20 10 






17 40 


Kendall 


R. D. Chappell 


10 90 


Amity 


H.P.Bartiett 

W. S. Hilbert 


9 00 




31 80 


Columbia 


Henry Rueck 


35 50 


Walshville 


Elzie Carmon 

Jas. A. McComas 

Alf Johnson 

Geo. E. Scott , 


27 90 


Manito 


22 40 


Pleiades 


6 30 


Wyoming 


19 70 


J. M. Eyler 


11 20 




Chas. D. Lawrence 

John M. Lieb 

Alex S. Jessup.. 


17 00 


Edge wood 


27 40 


Xenia 


30 40 


Bowen 


C. P. Jacobs 

Prank H. Pease 

C. W. Tolnier 

John W. Ransdell 


30 40 


Andrew Jackson 


38 60 


Clay City 

Cooper 


30 20 

27 20 




M. J. Piatt , 


24 10 


Libertyville 


John Austin 


9 60 


Tower Hill 


John Warren 


26 40 


Stone Port 


J. H. Blackman 


37 80 


Colchester 


J. E. Shields 


27 00 


Alma 


P. A. Wnarowski 


36 50 


Murphysboro 


G. J. Koons 


37 60 


St. Paul 


George Taylor, Jr 

Alex H. Wftite 


24 50 


Stark 


20 50 


Woodhull 


P. W. Overstreet 


21 30 


Odin 


Chas. E. Sloan 


30 40 




W. H. Stiner 


34 10 


Meridian Sun 


E. P. Gates 


13 40 


O. H. Miner 


13 60 


Home 


Geo. Ephgrdre 


6 30 


Parkersburg 


B. R. Falley 


30 20 


J. D . Moody 


J. A. Hindman 


31 80 


Wade-Barney 


P. L. Muhl 


18 60 


Bradford ... 

Andalusia 


E. H. Phenix. 

Carl J. Seastrand 


18 80 
23 80 


Litchfield 


W. D. Lipe 


29 10 


Abraham Lincoln 


J.F. Kyler 


24 50 


Roseville 


Chas. Carr 


23 10 


Anna 


E. S. Alden 


38 90 


Illiopolis 


H. C. Roberts „ 

Ed. P. Prideaux 


24 60 


Monitor 


9 70 


Chatham 


W.H.Whitney 

A. W. Gould .". 

Jas. D. Marshall . 


25 40 


Evans 


7 20 


Delia 


27 30 


Covenant 


Geo. N. Schmitt. 


6 10 


Rossville 


John Maury 


16 50 


Minooka 


A. C. Heap 


11 10 


Adams 




34 30 


Maquon 




23 20 


Ashton 




14 40 


Seneca 


H. R. Thomas 


13 20 


Altamont 


S. S.Smith .'." 

C. L. Pink 


27 10 


Cuba 


25 10 


Sherman 


G. H. Wayne , 


22 40 


Plainfield 


C.M.Reeves 


10 80 


J. R. Gorin 




20 20 


Lockport 

Chatsworth 


C. H. Foster 

S. S. Hitch , 


9 30 
15 70 


Oak Park 


S.B. Harvey 

J. B. Singer 1 


6 90 


Stewardson 1 


25 50 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



183 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



LODGE 


NO. 


REPRESENTATIVE. 


CO 

3 


0) 

i 


B 

V 

S 

S-i 

0) 


o 




542 
543 

544 

547 

550 

554 

555 

556 

557 

558 

559 

560 

562 

564 

565 

566 

567 

569 

570 

572 

573 

574 

575 

576 

577 

578 

580 

581 

582 

583 

584 

585 

587 

588 

590 

591 

592 

595 

600 

601 

602 

603 

604 

607 

608 

609 

610 

611 

612 

613 

614 

616 

617 

618 

620 

622 

623 

627 

630 

631 

632 

633 

634 

635 

636 


H. E. Tilbury .... 

Wm. R. Freek 


118 

153 

210 

176 

123 

126 

84 

196 

2 

66 

143 

258 

359 

133 

266 

144 

314 

260 

215 

197 

65 

108 

70 

291 

167 

209 

198 

338 

132 

267 

163 

194 

104 

278 

137 

81 

272 

198 

163 

223 

206 

186 

74 

94 

91 

85 

3 

2 

110 

247 

93 

227 

218 

244 

197 

149 

210 

339 

305 

80 

40 

87 

93 

193 

40 


$11 80 

15 30 
21 00 

17 60 
12 30 

12 60 
8 40 

19 60 

20 

6 60 

14 30 

25 80 

35 90 

13 30 

26 60 

14 40 
31 40 

36 00 

21 50 

19 70 

6 50 
10 80 

7 00 

29 10 

16 70 

20 90 
19 80 
33 80 
13 20 

26 70 
16 30 
19 40 

10 40 

27 80 

13 70 

8 10 
27 20 

19 80 
16 30 

22 30 

20 60 

18 60 

7 40 

9 40 
9 10 

8 50 
30 
20 

11 00 
24 70 

9 30 
22 70 

21 80 
24 40 

19 70 

14 90 
21 00 
33 90 

30 50 
8 00 

14 00 

8 70 

9 30 
19 SO 

4 00 


$6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


$17 80 
21 30 
27 eo 
23 60 




Virginia 


Valley 


T. L. Bedford 


Sharon 


C. R. Condit 


18 30 


Plum River 




18 60 


Humboldt 




Dawson 


A. E. Stoker 

H. W. Huttmann 


25 60 


Lessing 


6 20 


Leland 




10 60 


Thomson 


A. P. Atherton 


20 30 


Madison 




31 80 


Trinity 


C.H. Shuler 


41 90 


Winslow 




19 30 


Pleasant Hill 


W. A. Windmiller 


32 60 


Albany 


Louis Hoobler 


20 40 


Frankfort 




37 40 


Time 


C. E. Bagby 


32 00 


Jacksonville 


R. C. Singley 


27 50 


Bardolph 


H. A. Maxwell 


25 70 


Gardner 




12 50 


Pera 


E. M. Hamilton 


16 80 


Capron 


A. R. Montgomerv 


11 00 
35 10 


O'Fallon 


Viola 


F. D. Sexton 


22 70 


Prairie City 


Geo. H- White 


26 90 


Hazel Dell 




25 80 


Dongola 


J. H. Eddleman 


39 80 


Shirley 


H. H. William 


19 20 


Highland 




32 70 


Vesper 




22 30 


Fisher 


N. E. Porter 


25 40 


Princeton 




16 40 


Troy 


H. A. Camedy 


33 80 


Fairmount 


W.H.Goodwin 

G. L. Harris 

Chas. W. Brown 


19 70 


Gilman 


14 10 
33 20 


Fieldon 


Miles Hart 


H. L. Blythe 


25 80 
22 30 


Cerro Gordo 


John W. Vent 


Farina 


F. E. Hewitt 


28 30 


Watson 




26 60 


Clark 




24 60 
13 40 


Hebron 


W. M. Miller 


Streator 


E. M. GricrffS 


16 40 
15 10 


Piper , 


C. A. McClain 


Sheldon 




14 50 
6 30 


Union Park 




Lin coin Park 


O. A. Kropf 


6 20 


Rock River 


J. B. Burleigh 


17 00 
30 70 
15 30 
28 70 


Patoka 


J. S. Hudskett 


Forest 


H. M. Miller 


Wadley 


Burley Jones. 


Good Hope 




27 80 


Basco 




30 40 
25 70 
20 90 


New Hope 




Hopedale 




Locust • 




27 00 


Union 




39 90 


Tuscan 


J. W. McGhee.. 


36 50 




W. R. Watts 

F. M Hole 


14 00 
20 00 


Ridge Farm 

E. F. W. Ellis 




14 70 


Buckley 


Edwin Hull '.'..'.'.' 

J. D. Hunter. .. 


15 SO 

°5 30 


Rochester 


Peotone 


W. E. Imholz 


10 00 



184 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



RE PRESENT ATIVE S— Continued. 



Keystone 

Comet 

Apollo 

D. C.'Cregier 

Oblong City 

San Jose 

Somonauk 

Blueville 

Camden 

Atwood 

Greenview 

Yorktown 

Mozart 

Lafayette 

Rock Island , 

.Lambert 

Grand Chain 

South Park 

Mayo 

BeecherCity — 

Crawford 

Erie 

Burnt Prairie... 

Herder 

Fillmore 

Eddy ville 

Normal 

Waldeck.... 

A. O. Fay 

Enfield 

Illinois City 

Clement .. 

Morrisonville.... 

Blue Mound 

Burnside 

Galatia 

Rio 

Garfield 

Orangeville...... 

Clifton 

Englewood 

Iola 

Raymond 

Herrin's Prairie 

ShilohHill 

Belle Rive 

Richard Cole 

Hutton 

Pleasant Plains. 

Temple Hill 

Alexandria 

Braidwood 

Ewing.. 

Joppa 

Farmer City 

Providence 

Collinsville 

Johnsonville 

Newton 

Elvaston 

Calumet 

Arcana 

May 

Chapel Hill 

Rome 



641 
642 
643 
644 
645 
646 
647 
648 
651 
653 
655 
656 
657 



660 
662 
664 
665 
666 
667 



670 
672 
673 
674 
676 
677 
679 
680 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
687 



691 
692 
693 
695 
696 
697 
698 
700 
701 
702 
704 
705 
706 
710 
711 
712 
713 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
721 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



Sam Lewis 

M. H.Hand 

D. H. Shoukair 

C. W. Bastgen . 

J. G. Brown 

John Fryer 

DanH. Knight 

H.T. Gardner 

Thos. Hesler 

A. J. Quick 

C. H. Derry 

T. A. Durnon 

Wm.Fey 

J. T. Evans 

O. H. Schwenker 

H. C. Bruhn 

J. M. Jones 

T. A. Hewitt 

Jacob S. Clagg 

F. B.Huffman 

Jas. T. Atheys. . 

G. E. Thomson 

Geo. H. Brown .".".!. 

F. Hyszowerski-Hyson. 
V. A. Bost.... 

E. S. Barger . 

Frank Phillips 

Philip Weicker 

W. H.Thomas 

W.R. Miller 

M. M. Marquis 

0. W. Jacobson 

Geo. M. Wilson 

A. A. Bauer 

G. W.Carlisle 

John T. Ryan 

E. J. Tye .. 

Geo. E. Haley 

W. A. Musser 

Peter Wright 

John C. Kane 

Eli Patrich 

A. W. Jones 

A. A. McMurray 

L. E. Dudenbostle 

1. D. Hampton 

C. A. Ehrensworth 

Carron Lawyer 

W.H.Dosand 

R. C.Green 

J.R. McCall 

J. W. Patterson 

D. C.Fitzgerald 

R. H. Fryzzell 

John W. Kendall 

Robert Schmook 

Samuel Harrison 

E. M. Turner 

D. M. Fowler 

S. A. Symmonds 

Robert Arens 

Thos. McManns 

Ira Shain 

N. A. Norris , 

J. R.Walker... 



2 

144 

3 

2 

215 

163 

59 

202 

240 

160 

180 

121 

126 

333 

164 

263 

353 

6 

223 

214 

214 

133 

272 

3 

234 

333 

124 

4 

23 

277 

189 

171 

211 

187 

225 

307 

163 

5 

126 



221 
220 
321 
311 
293 
4 
193 
201 
367 
172 

57 
298 
208 
130 

10 
286 
252 
119 
237 

16 

1 

285 

323 

271 



a 



$ 20 

14 40 

30 

20 

21 50 
16 30 

5 90 

20 20 
24 00 
16 00 
18 00 
12 10 

12 60 
33 30 

16 40 

26 30 

35 30 
60 

22 30 

21 40 
21 40 

13 30 

27 20 
30 

23 40 
33 30 
12 40 

40 
2 30 

27 70 
18 90 

17 10 

21 10 

18 70 

22 50 

30 70 

16 30 
50 

12 60 

6 90 
30 

22 10 

22 00 
32 10 

31 10 
29 30 

40 

19 30 

20 10 

36 70 

17 20 
5 70 

29 80 
20 80 

13 00 
1 00 

28 60 
25 20 
11 90 

23 70 
1 60 

10 
28 50 

32 30 
27 10 



$6 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



185 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



TiODGE. 


NO. 


REPRESENTATIVE. 




bo 


a 

s 


o 

EH 


Walnut 


722 
723 
724 
725 
726 
727 
729 
730 
731 
732 
733 
734 
735 
737 
738 
739 
741 
742 
743 
744 
745 
746 
747 
748 
749 
750 
751 
752 
754 
755 
756 
757 
758 
759 
761 
762 
763 
764 
765 
766 
767 
768 
769 
770 
771 
772 
773 
774 
776 
777 
778 
779 
780 
782 
783 
784 
786 
787 
788 
789 
790 
791 

IF 

793 


O. Baechler 

Seth W. Hollemen. 


110 
292 
207 
111 
1 
201 
320 
297 

12 
212 
110 
181 

64 
125 

83 
3 
168 
136 
151 
295 

94 
150 
142 
155 
316 
123 

32 
241 
144 
185 
218 

75 

8 

270 

105 

195 

30 
176 

12 
236 

12 

5 

217 

15 

384 

323 

131 

5 

10 
6 
355 
5 
4 
121 
1 

11 
191 
304 
178 
8 
254 
155 
272 
165 


$11 00 

29 20 

20 70 

11 10 

10 

20 10 
32 00 
29 70 

1 20 

21 20 

11 00 
18 10 

6 40 

12 50 

8 30 
30 

16 80 

13 60 
15 10 

29 50 

9 40 
15 00 

14 20 

15 50 

31 60 

12 30 
3 20 

24 10 

14 40 

18 50 
21 80 

7 50 
80 

27 00 
10 50 

19 50 
3 00 

17 60 
1 20 

23 60 

1 20 

50 

21 70 
1 50 

38 40 

32 30 

13 10 
50 

1 00 

60 

35 50 

50 

40 

12 10 

10 

1 10 

19 10 

30 40 
17 80 

80 

25 40 

15 50 
27 20 

16 60 


$6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


$17 00 
35 20 
26 70 




Chandlerville 


Albert Amant 






17 10 
6 10 


Golden Rule 


Franklin P. Dean 

Jos. Tilley 


Raritan 


26 10 


Lake Creek 


M. Ozment 


38 00 


Eldorado. ... 




35 70 


Harbor 


B. T. Hedges 


7 20 


Carman 

Gibson 


W.C. Vaughn 

J. H. White 


27 20 
17 00 


Morning Star 


John B. Sympson 


24 10 


Sheridan 




12 40 


Arrowsmith 


W. O. Gilbert 


18 50 


Saunemin 


Dr. C. F. Ross , 


14 30 


Lakeside. 

New Holland 


Joseph W. Leverenz 

James Ryan 


6 30 

22 80 


Danvers 


D. G. Maurer 


19 60 


Scott Land 




21 10 


Goode 


S. C. D. Reo 


35 50 


Winnebago 


F. J. Waterstreet 


15 40 


Weldon 


Chas. G. Lisenly 


21 00 


Centennial 


W. H. Rickey 


20 20 


Alta 


W. C. Chambers 


21 50 


Akin 


J. J. Bundy 


37 60 


Lyndon 

Lounsbury 


P.C.Riley 


16 30 


E. F. Wish man 


9 20 


Allendale 


James O. Kogan 


30 10 


Ogden 


Abner Silkey 


20 40 


Pre-emption 


S. S. Johnston 


24 50 


Hardinsville 


Forests. Hurlbert 

C. C. Fenn 


27 80 


Verona ... 


13 50 


Mystic Star 


Mark D. Taylor 


6 80 


Orel 


W. A. Newman 


33 00 


Sibley 


H. D. Young 


16 50 


Van Meter 


Joe Johnson 


25 50 


Crete 


Frank B. Wilder 


9 00 


Sullivan 


H.C.Shirey 


23 60 


Palace 


Henry Denhart 


7 20 


Littleton 


P. M. Powell 


27 60 


Triluminar 


James W. Swope 


7 20 


Mizpah 


Lewis M. Russell 


6 50 


St. Elmo 


Jos. R. Morrison 


27 70 


LaGrange 


Harry C. Kinsley 


7 50 


Bay City 


C. A. Golden 


44 40 




R. W. Alsbrook 


38 30 


Mansfield 


W. R. Merserean 


19 10 


Lake View 


Chas. A. Rohde 


6 50 


Grand Crossing 


D. F. King 


7 00 


Ravenswood 


Emil Jno. Merkey 


6 00 




A. T. Hazel 


41 50 


Wright's Grove 


Albert Nelson 


6 50 


Siloam 


Ira J. McDowell 


6 4 
18 10 


Potomac 


J. F. Payne 


Constantia 


Fred W. Grisen. . . 


6 10 


Beacon Light 




7 10 


Riverton Union 


John Marland 


25 10 




Dr. J. C. Fultz 


36 40 




W. H. Williams . 


C3 8Q 


A uburn Park 




6 80 


Pittsfield 


Roy D. Plaitner . . 


31 40 


Broadlands 


Harry Allen 


21 50 


Calhoun 


Gewert H. Wintzen 

Clark Harold 


88 80 

88 50 









186 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued 



Tadmor 

Myrtle 

E. M. Husted ... 
Normal Park .. 

Sidell 

Colfax 

Kenwood 

Sangamon 

Williamson 

Neponset 

Kensington 

S. M. Dalzell .... 

Nebo 

Royal 

Cornland 

Gillham 

Tracy 

De Land 

Humboldt Park. 

Ohio 

Ridgway 

Creal Springs .. 

Ben Hur 

Columbian 

Henderson 

New Canton 

Belknap 

Pearl 

Grove 

Arthur 

Mazon 

Sequoit 

Edgar 

Rockport 

Findlay 

Magic City 

Dean 

Toledo 

Triple 

Windsor Park.. 

Hindsboro 

Charity 

Berwvn 

Alto Pass 

Woodlawn Park 

Fides 

Park Lodge 

Martinton 

Bluffs 

Stronghurst — 

London 

Palestine 

Austin 

Chicago Heights 

Gothic 

Latham 

Brighton Park ., 

King Oscar 

West Gate 

Boyd D 

Utica 

Apple River 

Metropolitan 

Sorento 

Riverside 



REPRESENTATIVE 



K24 



John W. Pyler 

Harry W. Boos 

W. A. Jolly 

Oliver M.Zeis 

Joseph S. Smith 

Wm. Gaddis 

Alfred E. Dulton.... 

H. L. Wardlow 

W. B. Miller 

Chas. S. Russell 

H. A. Wray 

J as. W. Mclntyre 

John Blackwell 

Jas. M. Booter 

E. R. Jones 

Daniel R. Elam 

J. J. Bickel 

J. H. Wood 

Lewis A. Brinkerd . . 

H. A. Jackson 

S. M. Combs 

John L. Whiteside... 

Albert J. Ehlers 

Chas. E. Regnas 

C. T. McLean 

W.H Foster 

T. J.Hughes 

W.H. Hooker 

N. C. Pearce 

O. D. Makepeace 

Geo. P. Thomas 

F. B. Huber 

John W. Bott 

Chas. E. Miller 

C. A. Tucker 

Isaac R. Small 

John Bennett 

T. C. Connor 

James Kerr 

Robert B. Gillie 

C. W. Mitchell 

L. D. Armstrong 

Chas. J. Becker 

Louis E. Holcomb .. . 

F. D. Reed 

Martin Anderson — 

Harry D. Irwin 

Geo. A. Reed 

Jas. Hamilton 

Geo. T. Chant 

Samuel Way 

John M. Forsman 

Geo. G. McLaughlin. 

W. G. Stowell 

Frank M. Miller 

D. J. Joynt 

James Madaughlan.. 
Henry E. Lindblade. 

Chas. L. Wood 

Chas. Olson 

J. F. Blakeslee 

N.A.Scott 

N. E. Murray 

N. J. Ballenbaugh... 
W. L. Shepard, Jr... 







a 




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a 


% 


h 


329 


$32 90 


$6 


7 


70 


6 


237 


23 70 


6 


7 


70 


6 


146 


14 60 


6 


119 


11 90 


4 


4 


40 


6 


124 


12 40 


6 


317 


31 70 


6 


123 


12 30 


6 


13 


1 30 


6 


104 


10 40 


6 


261 


26 10 


4 


300 


30 00 


6 


172 


17 20 


6 


252 


25 20 


6 


13 


1 30 


6 


150 


15 00 


6 


5 


50 


6 


103 


10 30 


6 


299 


29 90 


6 


336 


33 60 


6 


7 


70 


6 


5 


50 


6 


157 


15 70 


6 


282 


28 20 


6 


346 


34 60 


6 


115 


11 50 


6 


21 


2 10 


6 


162 


16 20 


6 


71 


7 10 


6 


55 


5 50 


6 


154 


15 40 


6 


300 


30 00 


6 


205 


20 50 


6 


23 


2 30 


6 


321 


32 10 


6 


187 


18 70 


6 


278 


27 80 


6 


7 


70 


6 


168 


16 80 


6 


197 


19 70 


6 


10 


1 00 


6 


332 


33 20 


6 


8 


80 


6 


17 


1 70 


6 


10 


1 00 


6 


68 


6 80 


6 


232 


23 20 


6 


213 


21 30 


6 


183 


18 30 


6 


253 


25 30 


6 


7 


70 


6 


27 


2 70 


6 


281 


28 10 


6 


185 


18 50 


6 


6 


60 


6 


12 


1 20 


6 


271 


27 10 


6 


67 


6 70 


6 


94 


9 40 


6 


144 


14 40 


6 


5 


50 


6 


248 


24 80 


6 


12 


1 20 


6 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



187 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



St. Andrews 

Olympia 

St. Cecilia 

"West Salem 

Chadwick 

Cornell 

May wood 

Lostant 

Argenta 

FreeWill 

Standard 

Nifong 

Cornerstone 

William McKinley 

Granite City 

Equity 

Composite 

John B. Sherman . 

Marissa 

Boulevard 

Wheeler 

Bethany 

Villa Grove 

Hooppole 

Pyramid 

Damascus , 

America 

Des Plaines 

Logan Square 

Constellation 

Loraine 

Utopia 

Crescent • 

Kosmos 

Ogden Park 

Selvis 

Carnation 

Edgewater 

Alto 

Elkhart 

Carlock 

Hanover 

Coffeen 

Ancient Craft 

Gil. W. Barnard... 

Bee Hive 

Hull 



863 
864 
865 



869 
870 
871 
872 
873 
874 



877 



880 
881 
8?2 
883 
884 



887 



892 



894 
895 



900 
901 
902 
903 
904 
905 
906 
907 



910 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



Robert A. Sempill , 

Wm. P. Preble 

Richard B. Prendergrast 

S. R. Skinner 

F. W. Zugschwert , 

F. L. Gardner 

Alfred H. Mussing 

R.W.Phillips 

Samuel O. Hilbrant 

W.J. Larts 

E. C. Tillatson 

C. R. Van Winkle 

Edward Beecroft 

Wm. T. Bazner 

John W. Costley 

J . Scott Matthews 

A. J. Weston 

W. J. Freckelton, Jr 

W. C. Steward , 

H. J.Laub 

W. C. Harned 

John Sampley 

D. F. Richman .. 

Carl Lorenzen 

Walter B. Nolen , 

George Edwards 

Thos. G. Kerwin 

Dean F. Webster 

Walter Beile 

Jos. Dutton, Jr 

J. O. Wade 

Harley F. Sprague 

Henry Cohen 

J.C. Higgins 

John A. Anderson 

Walter G. Baker 

R. H. Rockwood 

T. M. Glennon 

E. L. Carwin 

Logan Barker 

E. E. Farmer 

Franklin Miller , 

C. F. Laws 

H. Silverman 

David C. Hibbott 

L. E. Hamburg , 

Geo. W. Lawrence 







ft 






0) 








bJD 






cq 


n 


H 


■3 


V 


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V 


O 


% 


a 


Ph 


H 


1 


$ 10 


$6 


$6 10 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


1 


10 


6 


6 10 


248 


24 80 


6 


30 80 


130 


13 00 


4 


17 00 


105 


10 50 


6 


16 50 


7 


70 


6 


6 70 


113 


11 30 


6 


17 30 


163 


16 30 


6 


22 30 


133 


13 20 


6 


19 20 


1 


10 


6 


6 10 


215 


21 50 


6 


27 50 


1 


10 


4 


4 10 


2 


20 


6 


6 20 


275 


27 50 


6 


33 50 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


6 


60 


6 


6 60 


318 


31 80 


6 


37 80 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


210 


21 00 


6 


27 00 


193 


19 30 


6 


25 30 


145 


14 50 


6 


20 50 


152 


15 20 


6 


21,20 


18 


1 80 


6 


7 80 


8 


80 


6 


6 80 


1 


10 


6 


6 10 


25 


2 50 


6 


8 50 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


285 


28 50 


6 


34 50 


4 


40 


6 


6 40 


8 


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6 


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6 


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6 


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9 


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162 


16 20 


6 


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4 


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77 


7 70 


4 


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169 


16 90 


6 


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203 


20 30 


6 


26 30 


158 


15 80 


6 


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228 


22 80 


6 


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8 


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10 


1 00 


6 


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6 


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303 


30 30 


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All of which is fraternally submitted, 

W. F. Beck, 
G. A.- Lackens, 

H. T. GODDARD. 



Committee. 



The report of the Committee was adopt 



ed 



188 Proceedings of the (October 14, 

ADDITIONAL EEPOET— Committee on finance. 
Bro. S. O. Spring, chairman of the Finance Committee, 
presented an additional report from that Committee : 

Your Committee on Finance, to which was referred the resolution 
offered by Bro. J. Scott Matthews, have duly considered the same and 
recommend that a Past Grand Master's jewel be purchased for each 
Past Grand Master at a cost not to exceed one hundred dollars each. 
That the Grand Master appoint a special committee of which he shall 
be a member to select and purchase said jewels. Also recommend that 
the sum of one hundred dollars be paid M.W. Bro. W. B. Wright in 
place of the jewel as he provided himself with a jewel at his own 
expense. 

Your Committee would further report that the resolution offered 
by R.W. Bro. Burnap, appropriating the sum of fifty dollars to W. Bro. 
W. B. Grimes meets with our approval and we recommend the adop- 
tion of the same. 

We also approve of the resolution offered by M.W. Bro. C. E. 
Allen providing for the printing of a Tableau of the Masonic Lodges 
of the World and recommend the adoption of the resolution. 

S. O. Spring, 
N. N. Lampert, 
T. A. Stevens, 
The report was adopted. Committee. 

KEPORT— Committee to Examine Visitors. 
The report of the Committee to Examine Visitors was 
presented : 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M.: 

Your Committee to Examine Visitors have the honor to report that 

they have examined all visitors who have presented themselves for that 

purpose during the present session of the Grand Lodge and have 

vouched for them to the Grand Tyler. 

Charles H. Martin, 
S. S. Borden, 
Austin H. Scrogin, 
Chas. S. DeHart, 
Richard F. Morrow, 

Committee. 

The report was adopted. 



1009.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 189 

AMENDMENT -To By-Laws, Proposed. 
Bro. John C. Weis presented the following amendment 
to Section 6, Article 19, Part 2, Grand Lodge By-Laws, and 
it being seconded by representatives of more than twenty 
lodges, lies over until next year. 

To amend Section 6, Article 19, Part 2 of Grand Lodge By-Laws, 
by striking out all that part of said section beginning with the word 
"Documentary" in the third line of said section, and inserting in lieu 
thereof the following, "but if not so vouched for, he shall be required to 
furnish documentary evidence, as to the name and number of his lodge, 
and to take the Test Oath in addition to strict trial and due examina- 
tion of his knowledge of Masonry." Making said section read when 
amended, as follows : 

Sec. 6. No visitor shall be admitted to any lodge under this juris- 
diction unless lawfully vouched for as a Master Mason in good stand- 
ing; but if not so vouched for, he shall be required to furnish docu- 
mentary evidence as to the name and number of his lodge, and to take 
the Test Oath in addition to strict trial and due examination of his 
knowledge of Masonry. 

REMAKES. 

M.W. Bro. Leroy A. Goddard spoke as follows : 

M.W. Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

I only want to say a word of tribute to the memory of a great soul 
that passed away during this last year, — R.W. Bro. Rev. Hiram W. 
Thomas, — who was one of the purest men that I ever knew. I feel 
called upon to do this for the reason that Brother Thomas never held 
an elective office in this Grand Lodge and would otherwise get no place 
in our proceedings more than the usual reference in the address of the 
Grand Master and the report of the Committee on Obituaries, and these 
are not very full because Brother Thomas was absent from the city for 
a number of years and but limited information came to the Committee. 
Brother Thomas has passed the threshold of this life of the physical 
plane into the spiritual world. It certainly was not seemingly for him 
a long journey for he was one of the most spiritual, Godly men that I 
ever knew. It seemed like just a passing behind the veil. 

Brother Thomas was an enthusiastic Mason, not for the purpose of 
the honors or for selfish gain, but more because he saw through this 
organization, this great fraternity, such vast possibilities of help for 
humanity. He loved humanity. To my mind he ranked equal with the 



190 Proceedings of the (October 14, 

greatest as an exponent of the higher ideals of Freemasonry and in giv- 
ing in words expression of its principles, its teachings and its spiritual 
truths. 

Brother Thomas filled the office of Grand Chaplain in this Grand 
Lodge one year, under M.W. Bro. Darrah ; two years under M.W. Bro. 
Smith, and two years with me. He was also appointed Grand Chaplain 
by M.W. Bro. Allen, but that frail body of his was unable to bring 
him back to Chicago frcfm the Southland, where he had gone for his 
health. He was never able to return until his lifeless body was brought 
back by his friends. I served as one of the honorary pallbearers and 
was impressed with this tribute paid him, on returning, by M.W. Bro. 
Moulton, who said that to him the personality of Hiram W. Thomas 
came nearer being like that of the Christ than any other man with 
whom he had ever come in contact. Can words express more? Is there 
any higher tribute that can be given? 

There are lots of Masons in this state who understand the laws of 
Masonry and obey them. Our lodges have lots of members who can 
fill the offices and do fill them creditably. There are lots of Masons 
who care for the sick, bury the dead, help the poor and protect the wid- 
ows and orphans, but this man's life was given to others. He was a 
Mason not only in words nor alone in deeds, but in his very self. His 
life was Masonry and his Masonry was life, and I feel that it is a 
great privilege to me to pay this tribute to him. I only wish that I had 
the eloquence to unfold to you the simplicity, the grandeur and the 
holiness of this man as I saw him. 

I knew Brother Thomas thirty-five years ago. He was always frail 
in body but strong in intellect ; gentle in nature but stubbornly firm 
for principle. This was the index of his life. He knew not much of 
matters of commerce and trade in a practical way; he left no aggre- 
gation of material wealth as a monument, but he has left an impression 
in the hearts of hundreds of thousands of listeners by his eloquence, 
by his understanding of the Truth, and by his ability to convey it to 
others, 

M.W. Bro. Monroe A. Crawford said : 

M.W. Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

I appear before you this morning simply to discharge a duty that I 
promised a brother on the 23d day of last April, that I would discharge 
when I came to this Grand Lodge. By direction of the Grand Master 
I visited Quincy, Illinois, for the purpose of having a consultation with 
our lamented brother, Joseph Robbins, Past Grand Master of this Grand 
Lodge, and who was at that time the Committee on Correspondence. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 191 

He was standing in the shadow of death, brethren, and the last con- 
versation I had with him, he was standing by me and gave me a com- 
mission to deliver to this brother, to that brother and this brother, ask- 
ing me to deliver them when I came to this Grand Lodge, which I have 
done. And finally, he held out his hand to me, and I shook hands with 
him ; he said to me : I will never go to the Grand Lodge again ; when 
you go there, I want you to remember me to the Grand Lodge. Breth- 
ren, I come before you now. I have performed that duty, and I have 
remembered our distinguished brother to you today. 

M.W. Bro. Owen Scott said : 

M.W. Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

In the light of the beautiful tribute by the Grand Master I hesitated 
to attempt to say what was in my heart concerning our great leader. 
But since Brother Crawford has spoken concerning the meeting at 
Quincy I feel impelled to add a brief word. 

It was my melancholy privilege to be present at this meeting of the 
committee that was held in Quincy to which Brother Crawford has re- 
referred. It became my duty, under the direction of the Grand Master, 
to be present at another and a later deliberation. I went to the hos- 
pital to which Brother Robbins had been removed with a stenographer. 
The report that was read to you yesterday was dictated by him from 
the bed upon which he lay when his great spirit went out. I have never 
seen a man with such courage, a man with such sublime hope, a man 
with such beautiful impulses, even in the very shadow of death, as he 
exhibited at this time. After I went to my home there were a few 
things that came to his mind that he wanted to say further. He wrote 
to me in his own trembling hand and I have the original report, with 
his own handwriting, with his own signature. But a short time after 
that we were all summoned to pay the last tribute of respect to the 
remains of one that I esteem the greatest Mason, at the time of his 
death, in this world — greatest in Masonic scholarship, greatest in the 
knowledge of Masonic law, and greatest in the esteem of his friends 
and his companions in his work throughout the entire world. The 
principle laid down in our great light that "A prophet is not without 
honor save in his own country'' does not apply to him. The great 
brotherhood in Illinois, before whom he stood for a half century as 
thinker, writer, interpreter of masonic law and usage, delight to honor 
Joseph Robbins for his purity of life, his nobility of character and his 
princely bearing as a Mason. I esteem it a privilege to say these words, 
without preparation, without any thought of saying them, but just as 
they came from my heart. As we turn from that clay, we turn from 



192 Proceedings of the (October 14, 

the grave of one who had the impulses of Masonry, and who seeks for 
the good of the world. May the emotions and desires of the great 
heart that was within his giant frame thrill us with his thoughts and 
with the aims and purposes of making Ancient Craft Masonry higher 
and better that it may ennoble and enrich humanity. 

KESOLUTION. 
R.W. Bro. Roswell T. Spencer presented the following 
resolution : 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Illinois: 

Bro. David Kennison, a veteran of the War of the American Rev- 
olution, and of the War of 1812, lies buried in Lincoln Park, in this city. 
He died on February 28, 1852, at the remarkable age of 115 years, and 
was the last survivor of "the Boston tea party," having been one of the 
Masons who, disguised as Indians, on the night of December 16, 1773, 
threw the tea into Boston harbor. He fought at the battles of Bunker 
Hill, White Plains, West Point and Long Island, and witnessed the 
surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. He also served in the 
War of 1812. He was born at Kingston, N. H., November 17, 1737, and 
came to Chicago in 1842, where he spent the last ten years of his life. 
It is said that he was made a Mason previous to the Revolution, in a 
lodge in the state of Maine. 

It has been suggested that a bronze plate suitably inscribed, giving 
his Masonic history, might with great propriety, be inserted in the side 
of the boulder which marks his grave. I, therefore, move that a spe- 
cial committee of three be appointed to make an official investigation of 
the facts in the case, to report next year with such recommendations as 
may be deemed advisable. 

It was adopted. 

EEMAEKS. 

M.W. Bro. Alexander H. Bell spoke as follows : 

Brethren : — Before proceeding with the installation, I wish sincerely 
to thank every brother of this Grand Lodge, and every brother in this 
state for their great courtesy to me at all times. I have done the very 
best I knew how to make an acceptable Grand Master, and to attend 
to the duties of this office, and whatever mistakes I have made, — I 
admit I have made many, — I made them because I didn't know any 
better. I have done the best I knew how. I have appreciated this 
great honor highly. I have endeavored to do the best work, in dis- 
charging the duties of a Grand Master. I thank you most sincerely, as 
I now retire. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 193 

EEP0ET- Masonic Eelief Association. 

R.W. Bro. Ralph H. Wheeler presented the following 
report : 

M.W. Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

Reporting as your representative to the biennial meeting of the 
Masonic Relief Association of the United States and Canada, held at 
St. Louis, Mo., on September 9 and 10 this year, I have this to say to 
you : The meeting was well attended and the work accomplished will 
be of great benefit to the craft wherever dispersed, and especially to the 
various bodies belonging to this association. 

A notable feature of the occasion was the welcome accorded to the 
delegates. His Excellency, Gov. Herbert S. Hadley, who is also a mem- 
ber of our order, welcomed us to the state of Missouri in a most elo- 
quent speech, in which he paid the highest tribute to Masonry and to 
our organization. Bro. John H. Gundlach, acting mayor of St. Louis, 
greeted us to the city across the river, in the most hospitable manner, 
and M.W. Bro. Robert R. Kreeger, Grand Master of Masons of Mis- 
souri, addressed us on behalf of the Masons of the state. 

At the close of the sessions the delegates were entertained at a 
banquet given by the Masons of St. Louis and their ladies, at which 
there were about 350 present. Among the visitors I have the pleasure 
of reporting that R.W. Bro. John C. Weis, D.D.G.M. of the Twentieth 
District, attended two sessions, and that W. Bros. J. J. Aston, of Chi- 
cago, and S. M. Schoemann, of McLeansboro, were present during the 
opening session. 

During the past two years the Grand Jurisdictions of California, 
Louisiana and Saskatchewan have joined the association, and Boards of 
Relief of ten different states and provinces have come into the fold. 
The secretary is mailing circulars to over 6,300 lodges at the present 
time, and during the past two years 33S impostors and unworthy men 
and women have been published in the circulars of the association, and 
the names of 115 old offenders working in new territory have been 
re-published. 

The financial condition of the association has improved during the 
last two years. Your representative was re-elected a member of the 
advisory board. Fraternally submitted, 

Ralph H. Wheeler. 

The report was adopted. 



13 



194 Proceedings of the (October 14, 

GKAND OITICEKS. 

The Grand Secretary read the list of the elected and ap- 
pointed officers : 

Albert B. Ashley, M.W. Grand Master. 

Delmar D. Darrah, R.W. Deputy Grand Master. 

Henry T. Burnap, R.W. Senior Grand Warden. 

Ralph H. Wheeler, R.W. Junior Grand Warden. 

Leroy A. Goddard, R.W. Grand Treasurer. 

Isaac Cutter, R.W. Grand Secretary. 

Rev. J. Webster Bailey, R.W. Grand Chaplain. 

Rev. Frank G. Smith, R.W. Grand Orator. 

Geo. A. Stadler, W. Deputy Grand Secretary. 

N. J. Cary, W. Grand Pursuivant. 

A. W. West, W. Grand Marshal. 

James John, W. Grand Standard Bearer. 

Robert Fletcher, W. Grand Sword Bearer. 

T. E. Gillespie, W. Senior Grand Deacon. 

W. H. Peak, W. Junior Grand Deacon. 

G W. Hamilton, W. Grand Steward. 

H. S. Albin, W. Grand Steward. 

Chas, F. Tenney, W. Grand Steward. 

James L. Scott, W. Grand Steward. 

C S. Gurney, Bro. Grand Tyler. 

AMENDMENT— To Constitution, Proposed. 
M.W. Bro. Owen Scott offered the following amendment 
to Section 4, Article 8, Constitution, and it being seconded, 
goes out to the lodges : 

Amend Sec. 4, Art. 8, of the Constitution by striking out the word 
"twenty" in the second line and insert the words one hundred in lieu 
thereof. The section when amended will read as follows : 

Sec. 4. The yeas and nays shall be ordered upon the demand of 
one hundred representatives. In taking the yeas and nays the lodges 
in their order shall be called first, the members secondly, and the Grand 
Officers last. In all votes and elections a majority shall govern unless 
otherwise provided by law. 

INSTALLATION. 
M.W. Bro. Alexander H. Bell assisted by M.W. Bro. 
William H. Scott, installed all the officers except the Grand 
Orator, who was absent. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 195 

Immediately after being installed Grand Master Ashley 
spoke as follows : 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge: * 

I am conscious of the great responsibility which this involves, and 
am deeply impressed with the confiding trust which you have reposed in 
me. I have taken a solemn vow that I will to the best of my ability 
faithfully and impartially perform all the duties incumbent upon me as 
your Grand Master. I have made this sacred promise in the presence 
of Almighty God. by whose guidance and with your assistance. I shall 
most earnestly strive to so conduct the affairs of the Grand Lodge as 
will meet with your approval. 

STANDING COMMITTEES, 

The Grand Secretary read the names of the brethren com- 
prising the Standing Committees : 

Masonic Jurisprudence — Edward Cook. A. H. Bell. J. C. Smith, 
C. E. Allen. W. B. Wright. 

Appeals and Grievances — M. C. Crawford. J. E. Dyas. Geo. R. 
Smith. H. H. Montgomery. Hugh A. Snell. 

Chartered Lodges — C. F. Hitchcock, C. M. Turner. S. M. Schoe- 
mann. Elmer E. Beach, Phil Barkley. 

Lodges Under Dispensation — H. C. Mitchell, John Johnston, I. H. 
Todd, John M. Hamilton, S. S. Chance. 

Mileage and Per Diem— W. F. Beck, G. A. Lackens, H. T. Goddard. 

Finance — S. O. Spring, Nelson X. Lampert, Thomas A. Stevens. 

Trustees Masonic Homes — \Ym. A. Dixon for one year, and James 
A. Steel, Geo. M. Moulton for three years. 

Correspondence — Owen Scott. 

Grand Examiners — Charles H. Martin, S. S. Borden, Austin H. 
Scrogin, Richard F. Morrow. Emerson Clark. 

TELEGRAM. 
The retiring Grand Master read a telegram of greeting 
from Bro. Arthur M. Hume, M.W. Grand Master of Mich- 



196 



Proceedings of the 



(October 14, 



INVITATION. 
An invitation was extended the M.W. Grand Master to 
lay the corner-stone of the new Central Masonic »Temple. 
The Grand Master accepted the invitation. 

THANKS TO GRAND MASTER. 
R.W. Bro. D. D. Darrah introduced the following reso- 
lution, and on motion it was adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Grand Lodge be and are hereby 
tendered to M.W. Bro. Alexander H. Bell, Grand Master, for the faithful, 
able and impartial manner in which he has discharged the arduous du- 
ties of his office during the past year. 

MINUTES APPROVED. 

The minutes of the proceedings for Thursday were then 
read and approved. 



CLOSED., 
At 10:45 a - m - n0 further business appearing, the M.W. 
Grand Master closed the M.W. Grand Lodge in ampU 
form. 




GRAND SECRETARY, 



M.W. Grand Master's Address— 

DECATUR, ILLINOIS. 



1909.) Grand Lodge of Illinois. 197 



PERMANENT MEMBEES 



M.W. Bro. W. H. Scott, P.G.M., Metropolis No. 91. 
M.W. Bro. John R. Thomas, P.G.M., Metropolis No. 91. 
M.W. Bro. John C. Smith, P.G.M., Miners No. 273. 
M.W. Bro. John M. Pearson, P.G.M., Piasa No. 27. 
M.W. Bro. Monroe C. Crawford, P.G.M., Jonesboro No. in. 
M.W. Bro. Leroy A. Goddard, P.G.M., Fellowship No. 89. 
M.W. Bro. Owen Scott, P.G.M., Wade Barney No. 512. 
M.W. Bro. Edward Cook, P.G.M., Blaney No. 271. 
M.W. Bro. Charles F. Hitchcock, P.G.M., Temple No. 46. 
M.W. Bro. George M. Moulton, P.G.M., Covenant No. 526. 
R.W. Bro. Charles Fisher, P.D.G.M, Central No. 71. 
R.W. Bro. W. J. A. DeLancey, P.D.G.M., Centralia No. 201. 
M.W. Bro. William B. Wright, P.G.M, Effingham No. 149 
R.W. Bro. Henry E. Hamilton, P.S.G.W., Lincoln Park No. 611 
M.W. Bro. Chester E. Allen, P.G.M., Alpha No. 155. 
M.W. Bro. Alexander H. Bell, P.G.M., Mt. Nebo No. 76. 
M.W. Bro. Albert B. Ashley, G.M., LaGrange No. 770. 
R.W. Bro. Delmar D. Darrah, D.G.M., Bloomington No. 43. 
R.W. Bro. Henry T. Burnap, S.G.W., Franklin No. 25. 
R.W. Bro. Ralph H. Wheeler, JG.W.. America No. 889. 



198 



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204 Districts and District Deputy Grawd Masters of the (Oct. 

Districts and District Deputy Grand Masters 
For the Years 1909-10. 



NAMES. 



Sarry W. Harvey , 

R. R. Jampolis 

Albert Roullier 



David D. King 

Wm. H.Bied 

Edw. W. Peterson. 

H. Vanderbilt 

Jay L. Brewster. .. 

James M. Huff 

John W. Oliver .... 

B. A. Cottlow 

J. H. Griffiths 

W. C. Stilson 

Milton T. Booth.... 

F. H. Bradley 

J. M. Hannum 

J. B. Fithian 

N. T. Stevens 

L. E. Rockwood 

JohnC. Weis 

C. T. Holmes 

C. L. Gregory 

Geo. D. Bell 

E. M. Crain 

L. W. Lawton 

Harry M. Palmer.. 

C. L. Sandusky 

Wilson P. Jones 

A. T. Summers 

Sidney E. Breese.. 

C. P.Ross 

W. W. Watson 



POSTOFFICE ADDRESS. 



Chicago .'. 

7^11 Lexington Ave. 

Chicago 

2uu Randolph St. 

Chicago 

Fine Arts Building- 
Chicago. 

1234 Congress St. 

Chicago 

6024 Calumet Ave. 
Chicago 

59i7 Midway Park. 
Chicago 

11232 Michigan Ave. 

Waukegan 

Belvidere 

Apple River 

Oregon 

Downers Grove 

Morrison 

Atkinson 

Princeton, R. F. D 

Lostant 

Joliet 

Clifton 

Gibson City 

Peoria 

Galesburg 

Aledo 

Bushnell 

Augusta 

Delavan 

McLean 

Danville 

Tolono 

Decatur 

Springfield 

Jacksonville 

Barry 



COUNTIES COMPOSING DISTRICT. 



Lodges Nos. 33, 271. 409, 524, 642, 697, 

751, 776, 795, 818, 843, 863, 878, 890, 899, 

914. 
Lodges Nos. 81, 277, 410, 526, 643, 711, 

758, 777, 797, 819, 850, 864, 879, 891, 900, 

915. 
Lod ges Nos. 141 , 308, 411 , 540, 662, 716, 

765, 779, 800, 832, 851, 865, 880, 892, 901, 

916. 
Lodges Nos. 160, 310. 422, 557, 669, 717, 

767, 780, 801, 836, 854, 869, 882, 894, 907, 
917. 

Lodges Nos. 182, 311, 437, 610, 674, 726, 

768, 783, 810, 839, 855, 873, 887, 895, 908 
Lodges Nos. 209, 314, 478, 611, 686, 731, 

770, 784, 813, 841, 860, 875, 888,896,909. 
Lodges Nos. 211, 393, 508, 639, 690, 739, 

774, 789, 815, 842, 862, 876, 889, 897, 913. 
McHenry and Lake. 
Boone.Winnebagoand Stephenson 
Jo Daviess and Carroll. 
DeKalb and Ogle. 
ifane, DuPage and Kendall. 
Whiteside and Lee. 
Rock Island and Henry. 
Bureau, Putnam and Marshall. 
LaSalle. 

Will and Grundy. 
Kankakee and Iroquois. 
Livingston and Ford. 
Peoria and Woodford. 
Knox and Stark. 
Warren, Henderson and Mercer. 
McDonough and Fulton. 
Hancock and Schuyler. 
Tazewell and Logan. 
McLean. 
Vermilion. 

Champaign and Piatt. 
Macon and DeWitt. 
Sangamon and Menard. 
Mason, Cass and Morgan. 
Brown and Pike. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



205 



DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS— Continued. 



POSTOFPRK ADLRESS. 



COUNTIES COMPOSING DISTRICT. 



Emmett Howard. 
Ralph M. Riggs... 

C. H. Burgdorff... 

D. W. Starr 

Chas. G. Young .. 

J. E. Jeffers 

H. Gasaway , 

W. H. Rupe 

C. O. Faught 

Anthony Doherty 

Enos Johnson. 

Geo. S. Caughlan.. 



Quincy 

Winchester. 
Carlinville.. 

Raymond 

Taylorville.. 

Areola 

Martinsville. 

Olney 

Altamont — 

Clay City 

Upper Alton 



Adams. 

Scott, Green, Jersey and Calhoun 
Macoupin. 

Montgomery and Bond. 
Christian and Shelby. 
Douglas, Coles and Moultrie. 
Edgar, Clark and Cumberland. 
Jasper, Crawford and Richland. 
Fayette and Effingham. 
Marion, Clay and Wayne. 
Madison and Clinton. 



45,T. S. Browning 



46 J. R. Ennis. 



47 I. A. Poster 

48 W. D. Abney 

49C.H. Thompson. 
50'j. K. West 



East St. Louis IMonroe, Randolph and St. Clair. 

Benton Washington, Jefferson, Perry 

and Franklin. 
Burnt Prairie Lawrence, Wabash, Edwards 

and White. 

New Haven Hamilton. Saline and Gallatin. 

Marion Jackson and Williamson. 

Cairo Union, Johnson and Alexander. 

Brookport Pope, Hardin, Massac and Pulaski. 



206 



Grand Lecturers 



(October, 



GRAND LECTURERS 

For the Year 1909-1910. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



GRAND EXAMINERS. 

C. H. Martin Bridgeport 

S. S. Borden Chicago 

A. H. Scrogin "Lexington 

Richard F. Morrow Virden 

Emerson Clark Parmington 

PAST GRAND EXAMINERS. 

W. B. Grimes Pittsfleld 

A. B. Ashley La Grange 

Charles F. Tenney Bement 

James John Chicago 

H. S. Hurd Chicago 

J. R. Ennis Burnt Prairie 

H. T. Burnap Upper Alton 

H. A. Snell Litchfield 

Isaac Cutter Camp Point 

M. B. Iott Chicago 

A. W. West Galesburg 

Charles S. DeHart Carthage 

EMERITUS GRAND LECTURERS. 

G. A. Stadler Decatur 

John E. Morton Perry 

W. O. Butler La Harpe 

Wm. E.Ginther Springfield 

T. H. Humphreys Charleston 

H. C. Yetter Galesburg 

C. E.Allen ...Galesburg 

D. D. Darrah Bloomington 

H. S. Albin Chicago 

Arthur G. Goodridge Chicago 

J. G. Seitz Upper Alton 

Enos Johnson Upper Alton 

R. H. Wheeler Chicago 

GRAND LECTURERS. 

D. E. Bruffett Urbana 

I.H.Todd E.St. Louis 

C. E. Grove Rock Island 

J. M. Willard Decatur 

J. E. Wheat Sterling 

S. M. Schoemann McLeansboro 

W. K. Bowling Thayer 

Chas. G. Young Taylorville 

James McCredie Aurora 

W. H. Peak Jonesboro 

C. N. Hambleton Jeff ersonville 

G. A. Lackens Good Hope 

A. O. Novander Chicago 

J. B. Roach Aurora 

T. N. Cummins Reevesville 

Louis Pickett Pullman 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Anthony Doherty Clay City 

Chas. T. Holmes Galesburg 

C. P. Ross Jacksonville 

Lawrence C. Johnson Galva 

Archibald Birse , Chicago 

F. M. Pendleton Quincy 

R. W. King Chicago 

E. E. Beach Chicago 

W. H. Robson Chicago 

H. W. Harvey Chicago 

F. H.Morehouse Chicago 

F. J. Burton Chicago 

I. A. Foster New Haven 

G. R. Smith Bloomington 

John H. Griffiths Downers Grove 

A. Jampolis Chicago 

W. A. Dixon Decatur 

Edw. W. Peterson Chicago 

Albert Davis Chicago 

Albert Roullier Chicago 

E. D. Brothers Chicago 

N. M. Mesnard Decatur 

John C. Weis Peoria 

Adam Schmidt <# Chicago 

Wm. Balhatchet Chicago 

H. E. Van Loon Chicago 

Will C. Stilson Tampico 

H. C. Michels Flora 

C. J. Wightman Grays Lake 

William Gardner Chicago 

W. H. Bied Chicago 

William Rothmann Chicago 

Emmett Howard Quincy 

W. E. Anderson Chicago 

J. M. Hederick Chatham 

D. W. Starr Raymond 

J. M. Hannum Lostant 

Nimrod Mace Bloomington 

R. G. Bright Normal 

W. S. Welsh Toulon 

N. B. Carson Bloomington 

David Richards Chicago Lawn 

Louis J. Frahm Chicago 

Geo. E. Carlson Moline 

E. C. Jackson.... Chicago 

G. M. Harmison Chicago 

H. M. Witt Chicago 

J. K. West Brookpor t 

A.. T. Summers Decatur 

C. B. Pavlicek Chicago 

Andrew McNally Chicago 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



207 



GRAND LECTURERS— Continued. 



ADDRESS 



J. M. Simpson Chicago 

W.P.Jones Tolona 

W. H. Rupe Olney 

W. W. Roberts .N. Crystal Lake 

Alva W. Cain Chicago 

W. H. Welch Lexington 

Hiram Vanderbilt Chicago 

P. A. Reinhard Peoria 

D. D. King Chicago 

L. E. Simons Chicago 

M. T. Booth Atkinson 

E. T. Osgood Harvey 

H. W. Mason Bloomington 

C. L . Montgomery Blue Mound 

J. S. Edmondson Decatur 

F.D.Fletcher Chatham 

C. M. Borchers Decatur 

F. H. Blose Bloomington 

B. A. Cottlow Oregon 

T. H. Land Carmi 

A. I. Porges Chicago 

Wm. E. Fitch LaSalle 

Wm. Grube LaSalle 

Samuel Bradford Ottawa 

Herman Blanchard Ottawa 

L . E . Rockwood Gibson City 

W. A. Hoover Gibson City 

L. B.Dyer Chicago 

Geo. N.Todd Mattoon 

William George Houghton Chicago 

John Frederick Lockett Chicago 

J. M. James Brid geport 

Roys Nelson Strohn Aurora 

O. E. Tandy Jacksonville 

Floyd Orlando Lorton Auburn 

James Lloyd Hammond Wilmette 

William Austin Mentzer Chicago 

Thomas Weeks Bloomington 

Richard Daniel Mills Ottawa 

Fred Grove Trenary LaSalle 

Wm. Elmer Edwards Chicago 

Chas. S. Borden Chicago 

James Elsworth Jeffers Areola 

Zarah S . Saylor Oakwood 

Schuyler Colfax Scrimger Pekin 

C. A. Prather .Edinburg 

H . M. Palmer McLean 

W. B. Moore Chicago 

W. D. Price Chicago 

Harry A. Dever Chicago 

Walter E. Marble Chicago 

Theodore Christensen Chicago 

jaines M. Huff Belvidere 



ADDRESS 



George Low Chicago 

H. H. Milnor Chicago 

H. O. Folrath Decatur 

Chas. H. Graves Chicago 

H. M. Robinson Chicago 

C. H. Thompson Cairo 

Amos Ball Gibson City 

0. H. Woodworth Areola 

R. H. Gully Tolono 

R. M . Riggs Winchester 

Otto Brail Chicago 

J. W. Mills Granite City 

Alfred E. Holmes Chicago 

W. C. Trowbridge Crete 

C. L. Gregory Aledo 

Frank F. Collins Areola 

James F. Boyle Chicago 

A. B. Collom Marissa 

John H. Brown Chicago 

John W. Johnson Chicago 

J. E. Glath art Olney 

David C. Hibbott Chicago 

Boyd S. Blaine Champaign 

William N. Ewing McLean 

Charles S. Lawrence Lexington 

T. Bryson Strauss Gibson City 

B. I. Pumpelly Atlanta 

Arthur E. Wood Gibson City 

George Edwards Chicago 

Walter T. Boggess Catlin 

Almon Stansberry Westville 

N. E . Porter Edinburg 

Clarence A. Tucker Findlay 

Herbert C. Bush Decatur 

Frank H. Bradley Wyanet 

Lewis A. Brinkman Chicago 

Albert P. William Chicago 

Thomas G. Kerwin Chicago 

Elmer Tregay LaSalle 

Richard B. Prendergast Chicago 

Francis M. Cruikshank Chicago 

Geo. W. Flood Rock Island 

Sidney S. Pollack Chicago 

H. Gasaway.. Martinsville 

J. A. Wesch Areola 

J. I. Brydon Martinsville 

Benjamin Bing Urbana 

J. M. Foreman Palestine 

1. J. McDowell Chicago 

Oscar Formhals Ottawa 

W. E. Speckmau Ottawa 

Louis A. Kaiser Tonic a 

W.H.Barnard Ottawa 



208 



Representatives 



(October* 



REPRESENTATIVES 

OP THE M. W. GRAND LODGE OF ILLINOIS NEAR OTHER GRAND LODGES. 



GRAND LODGE. 



Alberta 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas , 

British Columbia 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Cuba 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

England 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Indiana 

Ireland 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Manitoba 

Maine 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

New Zealand 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Prince Edward Island 

Quebec 

Queesland..., 

Rhode Island 

Saskatchewan 

Scotland 

South Australia 

South Carolina .'. 

South Dakota 

Tasmania 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

Western Australia 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

United Grand Lodge of Victoria. 

United Grand Lodge of New 

South Wales 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



Wm. G. Ibbotson 

W. W. Damn 

Artemus Louden Grow 

Frank L. Wolverton 

W. W. Northcott 

Abraham Shaw 

Henry M. Teller 

Geo. E. Parsons 

Juan B. Hernandez Barreiro. 

Geo. M. Jones 

L. Cabel Williamson 

Walter Henry Harris — 

James C. Craver 

Wm. H.Chaffee 

Albert B. Moss 

B. M. Wiloughby 

Obadiah Ternan 

Matthew M. Miller. 

Chas. F. Buck 

John Leslie 

William R. G.Estes 

David C. Avery 

Arthur M. Hume 

A. T. Stebbins 

Frederic Speed 

W. F. Johnson 

Cornelius Hedges 

George H. Thummel 

Charles E. Mack 

William A. Dougherty 

Sewell W. Abbott 

Jos. A. Gaskill 

Delbert Green 

Murdoch McLean 

Leo. D. Heartt 

E. George Guthrie 

Theo. A. Cossman 

O. P. Sperra 

Frank W. Anderson 

W. T. Wright 

Henry M. Aitkin 

H. Edgar Channell 

Chas. H. Harley 

Newton D. Arnold 

Geo. W. Bilbrough 

Miles Mclnnes , 

John Trail McLean 

John F. Ficken 

Oscar S. Gifford 

Rev. Wm. Hoggs 

A. V. Warr 



A. Scott Chapman. 
Delos M. Bacon.. . 
Wm. L. Andrews 

Louis Ziegler 

Frank R. Perret.. 
Hiram R. Howard 
Charles C. Rogers 
Edward Edwards. 



RESIDENCE. 



Edmonton 

Grove Hill. 

Tombstone. 

Blythesdale. 

Victoria. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Central City. 

Norwich. 

Havana. 

Dover. 

Washington. 

London. 

Sutherland. 

Tallapoosa. 

Payette. 

Vincennes. 

Enniskillen. 

Topeka. 

New Orleans. 

Winnipeg. 

Skowhegan. 

Baltimore. " 

Owosso. 

Rochest* r. 

Vicksburg. 

Boonville. 

Helena. 

Omaha. 

Virginia. 

Saint John. 

Wolfboro. 

Mount Holly. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Auckland 

Raleigh 

Fargo. 

Halifax. 

Ravenna. 

Waurika. 

Union. 

Charlottetow. 

Stanstead, P.Q. 

Brisbane. 

Providence. 

Regina. 

Dumfries. 

Adelaide. 

Charleston. 

Canton. 

Rossville. 

Salt Lake City •' 

St. Johnsbury. 

Roanoke. 

Spokane. 

Perth. 

Point Pleasant. 

Milwaukee. 

Melbourne. 



W. Beavis Sydney. 



1909.) 



Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



209 



REPRESENTATIVES 

OF OTHER GRAND LODGES NEAR THE GRAND LODGE OF ILLINOIS 



GRAND LODGE. 



Alberta 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

British Columbia 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Cuba 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

England 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Ireland 

Kansas • 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Manitoba 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

NewMexico 

New York 

New Zealand 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Prince Edward Island 

Quebec 

Queensland 

Rhode Island 

Saskatchewan 

Scotland 

South Carolina 

South Australia 

South Dakota 

Tasmania 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Australia 

West Virginia , 

Wisconsin 

United Grand Lodge of South 

Wales 

United Grand Lodge of Victoria. 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



H. A. Snell 

Chester E. Allen 

Monroe C. Crawford 

R. T. Spencer 

Loyal L. Munn 

Sylvester O. Spring. 

Albert Roullier 

Chas. F. Hitchcock. . . 
George M. Moulton.. 
William S. Cantrell.. 

L. A. Goddard 

JohnC. Smith 

John C.Smith 

W J. A. DeLancey... 

R. R. Jampolis 

W. B. Wright 

Delmar D. Darrah. . . 

Thomas E. Miller 

George M. Moulton . . 
Ler oy A. Goddard . . . 

Amos Pettibone 

Hugh R. Stewart .. . 

M. B. Iott 

Joseph E. Dyas 

R. H. Wheeler 

John C. Smith 

George A. Stadler.. . 

A. B. Ashley 

A. Jampolis 

JohnC. Smith 

JohnC Weis 

Henry E. Hamilton . 

W. B. Grimes 

Henry E. Hamilton.. 

Isaac Cutter 

John M. Pearson 

James B. McFatrich. 
Geo. W. Warvelle . . . 

L. B. Dixon 

S. S. Chance 

D. D. Darrah 

Frank W.Havill . . 

E. T. E. Becker 

John Johnston 

J. R. Ennis 

Albert B. Wicker .. 

Jas. A. Steele 

Joseph Robbins , - . . 

Elmer E. Beach 

William L. Milligan. 
Robert L. McKinlay. 

R. T. Spencer 

Alexander H. Bell.. . . 

C. M. Forman 

Owen Scott. 

H. A. Eidson 

Amos Pettibone 

.Joseph Robbins 

H. T. Burneap 

Charles Reif snider.. 
David D. King.. 

R. T. Spencer 

R. T. Spencer 



RESIDENCE. 



Litchfield. 

Galesburg. 

Jonesboro. 

Chicago. 

Freeport 

Peoria. 

Chicago. 

Peoria. 

Chicago. 

Benton. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Centralia. 

Chicago 

Effingham. 

Bloomington. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Evanston. 

Paris. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Decatur. 

LaGrange. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Peoria. 

Chicago. 

Pittsfield. 

Chicago. 

Camp Point 

Godfrey. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Salem. 

Bloomington. 

Mt. Carmel. 

Mt. Carroll. 

Chicago. 

Burnt Prairie. 

Franklin Gr've 

Sullivan. 

Quincy. 

Chicago. 

Ottawa. 

Paris. 

Chicago. 

Carlinville. 

East St. Louis. 

Decatur. 

Willow Hill. 

Chicago. 

Quincy. 

Upper Alton 

Onicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Chicago. 



LIST OF GRAND LODGES 

Recognized by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, together with Names and 
Addresses of Grand Secretaries. 



GRAND LODGE. 


GRAND SECRETARY. 


ADDRESS. 


Alberta 


Dr. Geo. Macdonald 

Geo. A. Beauchamp 

George J. Roskruge 

Fay Hempstead 


Calgary. 
Montgomery. 


Arizona 


Arkansas 


Little Rock. 




R E. Brett 




California 


John Wicher 






Ralph Leeming Gunn. . . 
Charles H. Jacobson — 

Frank W. Havens 

Carlos G. Charles 

Virginius V. Harrison.. 
A. W. Johnston 




Colorado 






Hartford. 


Cuba 






Wilmington. 
Washington. 
London. Freemasons Hall 


District of Columbia. .. 




Sir Edward Letchworth 
W. P. Webster 






Georgia.. 


W. A. Wolihin 


Macon. 


Theo. W. Randall 






Camp Point. 

Indianapolis. 

Atoka. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Dublin. 

Topeka. 

Louisville. 




Calvin W. Prather 

Joseph S. Murrow 

Newton R. Parvin 

H. E. Flavelle, D. G. Sec. 

Albert K . Wilson 

Henry B. Grant 

Richard Lambert 


Indian Territory 


Ireland 

Kansas 


Kentucky 


Louisiana 


New Orleans. 


Manitoba 


James A. Ovas 

William M. Isaac 

Thomas W. Davis 

Lou B . Winsor 


Winnipeg. 
Baltimore. 


Maryland 

Massachusetts 


Michigan 


Reed City. 
St. Paul. 


Minnesota 


John Fishel 


Mississippi 




Vicksburg. 
St. Louis. 




Montana 


Cornelius Hedges, Jr — 

Francis E . White 

Chauncey N. Noteware 

J. Twining Hartt 

Frank D. Woodbury — 
Benjamin F. Wakefield 

Alpheus A. Keane 

Edward M. L. Ehlers .. 




Nebraska 


Omaha. 




Carson City. 
St. John. 


New Brunswick 


New Hampshire 


Concord. 


New Jersey 

New Mexico 


Trenton. 
Albuquerque. 
New York. 


New York 


New Zealand 


Wellington. 
Raleigh. 
Fargo. 
Halifax. 


North Carolina 


John C . Drewry 


North Dakota 


Frank J. Thompson — 
Thomas Mowbray 


Nova Scotia 


Ohio 




Oklahoma 


Wm . M. Anderson 

J ames F . Robinson 

Wm. A. Sinn 




Oregon 


Portland, 388 Yamhill St 


Pennsylvania 


Philadelphia. 


Prince Edward Island. . 




Quebec 


Will H Whyte 




Queensland 


Cnas. H. Harlev 




Rhode Island 


S. Penrose Williams ... 




Saskatchewan 


Regina. 
Edinburg. 


Scotland 




South Australia 


J. H. Cunningham 

J T Barron 


South Carolina 




South Dakota 

Tasmania 


George A. Pettigrew . . . 
Jo tin Hamilton 


Sioux Falls. 
Hobart. 


Tennessee 


John B Garrett 




Texas 




Waco. 


Utah 


Christopher Diehl 


Salt Lake City. 


United Grand Lodge of 
Victoria 


United Grand Lodge of 
New South Wales. . . 


Arthur H. Bray 


Sydney. 

Burlington. 

Richmond. 


Vermont 


Henry H . Ross 

Geo. W. Carrington 

Horace W. Tyler 

J. D. Stevenson 

H R. Howard 


Virginia 


Washington 


Tacoma. 


Western Australia 

West Virginia 


Perth. 

Point Pleasant. 


Wisconsin 


Wm. W. Perry 


Milwaukee. 


Wyoming 


Wm. L. Kuykedall 


Saratoga. 



MASONIC LITERATURE. 

The Grand Secretary desires to thank the editors of the following 
magazines and papers for kindly supplying his office with their publi- 
cations during the past year, in exchange for our proceedings. V r ? 
shall be happy to exchange with all Masonic publications and papers 
having a Masonic department : 

The Illinois Freemason — Bloomington, Illinois. 

Masonic Advocate — Indianapolis, Indiana. 

The Masonic Chronicler — Chicago, Illinois. 

The Australasian Keystone — Melbourne, Victoria. 

The Trestle Board — 408 California street, San Francisco, California. 

Masonic News — Peoria, Illinois. 

Masonic Token — Portland, Maine. 

The Masonic Constellation — St. Louis, Missouri. 

The New Zealand Craftsman — Dunedin. 

Square and Compass — Denver, Colorado. 

The Texas Freemason — San Antonio, Texas. 

The American Tyler Keystone — Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

The Freemason and Fez. — Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

The Masonic Review — Tacoma, Washington. 

Square and Compass — New Orleans, Louisiana. 

The Tennessee Mason — Nashville, Tennessee. 

Masonic Standard — New York, New York. 

Masonic Voice and Review — 265 La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Eastern Star Signet — Chicago, Illinois. 

The Masonic Observer — Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

The Masonic Trestle Board — Chicago, Illinois. 

Missouri Freemason — St. Louis, Missouri. 

The New England Craftsman — Boston, Massachusetts. 

Corner Stone — 411 W. 145th St., New York City. 

The Mosaic — Saginaw, Mich. 

Masonic Reviezv — Johannesburg. 

Oriental Lodge Notes — Chicago. 



(§uv Fraternal Slrafc 


ILLINOIS 


R. W. Bro. Loyal Levi Munn 


PAST GRAND SECRETARY 


Born New York, September 1, 1829 


Died Freeport, III., November 23, 1908 


Bro. Calendar Rohrbough 


GRAND STEWARD 


Born Buchanan, West Virginia, September 1, 1834 


Died Kinmundy, III., September 11, 1909 







<§m 3Fratrotal J&mb 






ILLINOIS 




B 


ro. Richmond S. Dement 

GRAND ORATOR, 1877 

Died October 11, 1908 


B 


ro. 


Hiram Washington Thomas 

PAST GRAND CHAPLAIN 

Died August 12, 1909 




B 


ro. Henry Alonzo Eidson 






D. D. G. M. 

FORTIETH DISTRICT 

Died October 7, 1909 



£ 



(§nv Jfraternal $mb 




Other Grand Jurisdictions 




FRANCIS MARION ZUCK 




, Past Grand Master, Arizona. Died June 16, 


1909. 


JAMES W. NULL 




J Grand Tyler, Arkansas. Died August 3, 


1909. 


J MELVIN EDWARDS 




Grand Lecturer, Colorado. Died August 4, 


1909. 


HENRY ORANGE WARNER 




Past Grand Master, Connecticut. Died May 8, 


1909. 


;; JAMES LEWIS GOULD 




Past Grand Master, Connecticut. 




Died January 26, 


1909. 


WILLIAM E. ANDERSON 




Past Grand Master, Florida. 




Died November 12, 


190S. 


SIMEON STEVENS JOHNSON 




Past Grand Master, Indiana. Died January 19, 


1909. 


RUFUS EASTON ANDERSON 




Senior Past Grand Master, Missouri. 




Died July 27, 


190S. 


JOSEPH J. COUCH 




Past Grand Master, New York. 




Died February 10, 


1909. 


BRADNER SLAUGHTER 




Past Grand Master, Nebraska. Died May 8, 


1909. 


HENRY BROWN 




Past Deputy Grand Master, Nebraska. 




Died April 4, 


1909. 











($ror itfraternd ^mb 








Other Grand Jurisdictions 








WILLIAM BURR CHILDERS 








Senior Past Grand Master, New Mexico. 

Died March 31, 190S. 








ELIAS ELWELL DAY 








Past Grand Master, New Mexico. 

Died May 31, 1908. 








FABIUS HAYWOOD BUSBEE 








Past Grand Master, North Carolina. 

Died August 28, 1908. 








WILLIAM MOORE CUNNINGHAM 








Past Grand Master, Ohio. Died August 16, 1909. 








JACOB MAYER 








Past Grand Master, Oregon. 

Died December 31, 1908. 








JOHN CHARLES DAVIS 








Past Grand Master, Wyoming. 

Died January 15, 1909. 








JOHN S. TAYLOR 








Deputy Grand Master, Wyoming. 

Died December 21, 1908. 








GEORGE OF JOANNOVICS 








Venerable Grand Master, Hungary. 

Died January 10, 1909. 








EDMUND PRESTON McQUEEN 








Past Grand Master, Tennessee. 

Died August 14, 1909. 













(Dur ^Fraternal Sra& 


Past Masters of Illinois Lodges. 




NAME 


LODGE 


DIED 


Bacon, Fred P 


Scott No. 79 


August 27, 1908 


Baldwin, John R 


Fairmount No. 590.... 


May 9, 1909. 


Bassett, Charles Wallace. 


Ravenswood No. 777... 


September 27, 1908 


Beam, Henry D 


Oriental No. 33 


June 21, 1909 


Bliss, Charles E 


Avon Harmony No. 253 . . 


June 20, 1909 


Boren, J. W 


Milton No. 275 


October 9, 1908 


Booth, Lycurgus 


Rantoul No. 470 


May 14, 1909 


\; Brewster, Daniel 


Waukegan No. 78 


December 12, 1908 


Canisius, Charles 


Mithra No. 410 


February 2, 1909 


Castle, Cheney M 


Euclid No. 65 


February 9, 1909 


Clark, Chester M 


Galva No. 243 


April 25, 1909 


Claypool, Henry C 


Cedar No. 124 


March 8, 1909 


Copeland, P. Ralph.... 


E. F. W. Ellis No. 633 .. . 


October 14, 1908 


Corlus, John C 


Mendota No. 176 


March 17, 1909 


Davis, George W 


Carrollton No. 50 


December 13, 1908 




Blair No 393 


April 17, 1909 
September 25, 1909 


Dow, G. W 


Pearl No. 823 


Duff, William 


Catlin No. 285 


May 15, 1909 


Dunaway, Joseph Newton 


Occidental No. 40 


January 9, 1909 


Dutcher, George A 


New Canton No. 821. . 


December 8, 1908 


Flagler, George Z 


Livingstone No. 371... 


March 9, 1909 


tj Forster, John N 


Basco No. 618 


November 17, 1908 


Francis, Geo. Frederick 


Hesperia No. 411 


November 12, 1908 


Fraser, Harry David... 


Blaney No. 271 


October 12, 1908 


French, James B 


Garfield No. 686 


June 9, 1909 


Frick, Robert Simon... 


Lake Creek No. 729. . . 


February 5, 1909 


Gillmore, Henry M 


Delavan No. 156 


February 1, 1909 


Green, A. L 


Wabash No. 179 


February 18, 1909 


Haage, John Gottlieb.. 


Acacia No. 67 


May 30, 1909 


Hamilton, Charles A... 


Lyndon No. 750 


April 22, 1909 


Hanna, James E 


Golconda No. 131 


February 5, 1909 


Harper, Alexander McC. 


Washburn No. 421 


March 30, 1908 


Harris, Thomas G 


Cleveland No. 211 - 


September 24, 1908 


v Hill William 


Kendall No 471 


May 9, 1909 




Farm No 632 


June 7 1909 


Holway, Wesley H 


Blaney No. 271 


February 5, 1909 




Stratton No 408 


September 20. 1908 
May 28, 1909 
June 19, 1909 




Thos. J. Turner No. 409 . 
Logan No. 210 


Leeds, Lucian L 


Livermore, John K 


Raritan No. 727 


June IS. 1909 


Loveland, Frank F 


Amity No. 472 


September IS. 1908 



APPENDIX— PART 1. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 

MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE 

1909 



"And, when, in coming years, 

We bow in sorrowing tears, 

O'er death's last choice; 

Grant then sweet hope to cheer, 

The faith that knows no fear, 

The quickened ear to hear 

The still small voice." 

— Joseph Robbins. 




DR. JOSEPH ROBBINS, P.G.M. 



September 12, 1834 



July 19, 1909 



JOSEPH ROBBINS was cast in a heroic mold. He was 
large of stature, broad of mind and generous of heart. 
Descended from well-bred parents and born in a refined 
environment, he inherited a taste for learning and grew 
up in an atmosphere of culture that fostered an ambition for 
education. To the advantages of his immediate surroundings 
he added a scholastic degree and a subsequent post graduate 
course in a medical college, thereby laying a firm foundation 
for the exceptional development of his future life. 

His skill as a physician brought him abundant success in 
his profession and commanded the complete confidence of his 
fellows, who freely sought his ever ready counsel and rewarded 
him with their highest honors. His patients trusted him im- 
plicitly, feeling that he was not only their healer but also their 
teacher and friend. 

He took an active interest in political affairs and by his tact 
and loyalty gained a potent influence in his party, always exert- 
ing his power for the promotion of the best principles and the 
highest welfare of the state. Though often solicited to become 
a candidate for office he sought no personal preferment, but 
was always ready to aid in promoting the laudable aspirations 
of his friends. 

He had no patience with the devious ways of the profes- 
sional politician and no toleration for anything that savored 
of spoils or graft. 

In the Masonic fraternity he early won the highest prefer- 
ment and placed the impress of his broad learning and profound 
thought indelibly upon the legislation and literature of the 
craft. The fundamental principles of the institution had no 
clearer exponent and its sterling morality no abler defender. 
He stood firmly for the integrity and sovereignty of the grand 
lodge plan. His writings had a literary flavor that gave them 
a peculiar charm and made them an enduring monument to his 
industry, intelligence and high morality, placing him at the 
head of the correspondence guild. 

Thus was spent a life of the greatest physical vigor, the 
brightest intellectual power and the highest moral force in the 
pursuit of a purpose whose keynote was service. 

Words fail us to tell of the wealth of affection and devo- 
tion which his near friends and family enjoyed, or of the sor- 
row and desolation which his taking away brings to his 
hearth-stone. 

He approached the end in the same spirit in which he had 
lived ; fully conscious of the inevitable he preserved a calm and 
even cheerful exterior and a peaceful and confident trust in 
Him who doeth all things well. 

Our hero has gone to the grave. We crown his memory 
with laurels and bedew his tomb with our tears, but our mourn- 
ing is not without hope, for we know that he has only passed 
through the thin veil that separates us from the future. The 
door that opens for entrance only has admitted him, and safe 
within the realm of eternal bliss he stands with winning smile 
and outstretched hand to welcome us as one by one we fol- 
low on. 



TRIBUTES TO BROTHER ROBBINS FROM SOME OF HIS 

FELLOW LABORERS AT THE ROUND TABLE AND 

MEMBERS OF THE REPORTORIAL CORPS. 



"In the death of Joseph Robbins I have lost a devoted 
brother, the correspondence guild its chief, the Masonic world 
its ablest advocate." 

Geo. E. Knepper, Idaho. 



"Is he gone, the pure of the purest? 
The hand that upheld our blue banner the surest, 
Is he gone from our struggles away? 
But yesterday lending his brethren new life, 
Cold, mute in the coffin, today." 
"Our loss is irreparable. My sorrow is too great to tell 
in words." 

Thomas M. Matthews, Sr., Texas. 



"In the death of Brother Robbins Masonry has suffered a 
distinct loss. He was the dean of the reportorial corps, his 
distinguishing characteristic being his unswerving devotion to 
the customs and traditions of Ancient Craft Masonry." 

Aldro Jenks, Wisconsin. 



"Brother Robbins was an able and versatile writer, and an 
ever ready defender of all which in his opinion would promote 
the interests of Masonry; his loss will be most keenly felt by 
all who are interested in Masonic literature." 

J. M. Hodson, Oregon. 



"Brother Robbins dead ! For half a century he labored with 
voice and pen for the advancement of Masonry. He was a 
Masonic writer of rare power. He had clear and deeply con- 
firmed convictions and courage to maintain them. When such 
a man dies it is as when a star faints and falls out of the sky." 

Christopher Diehl, Utah. 



"As one who for a few years was permitted to be a fellow 
member with him in the honored circle of grand lodge cor- 
respondents I regret that he has been called from his useful 
labors with us. But we are taught by the lessons he so well 
knew that the Supreme Grand Master had other and higher 
duties for him and so called him away to his well deserved re- 
ward. Peace be to him." 

William Sherer, New York. 



"Brother Joseph Robbins will be sadly missed at the round 
table. His brain was such a rich mine of Masonic history and 
jurisprudence, and while he was vigorous and outspoken in 
maintaining his own ideas, still, withal he did it in such a 
kindly way, that though we differed with him at times, we' 
could not but love and respect him. Personally, I deeply de- 
plore his loss as that of an old and valued friend." 

Lou B. Winsor, Michigan. 



"Bro. Joseph Robbins was a fearless expounder of his be- 
liefs, and thereby held a prominent place among the readers 
of Masonic literature. His writings were ever clear, sharp and 
readily understood. His position was, as he viewed it, unas- 
sailable. His advocacy of a cause as well as his condemnation 
of a position taken by others was marked by its strength and 
logic." Albro E. Chase, Maine. 



"M.W. Bro. Robbins' work as foreign correspondent ranked 
with that of such Masonic giants as Vaux, of Pennsylvania ; 
Drummond, of Maine; Parvin, of Iowa; Vincil, of Missouri, 
and Singleton, of the District of Columbia.. It stood for the 
best that there was of zeal, tact, scholarship and devotion to 
Masonry." E. T. D. Chambers, Quebec. 



"Brother Robbins was able and learned, forceful and ac- 
curate, dignified and kindly, and, above all things, intensely 
loyal to the 'Masonry of the lodge' as lie phrased it. In his 
death the fraternity has sustained a great loss." 

James M. Lamberton, Pennsylvania. 



"The announcement of Brother Robbins' death has struck 
me as a blow of personal bereavement. 

"His untiring advocacy of all that is lofty and righteous, 
his ceaseless vindication of Masonic ideals, his utter abhorrence 
of anything selfish or mercenary intruding into the temple drew 
all true hearts to him. His warm friendship for the individual 
reviewers shone always resplendent, even when their opinions 
were most repugnant to his standards and were most trench- 
antly assailed. There was but one Joseph Robbins and he will 
not be replaced." 

S. A. Brown, South Dakota. 



"I regard Joseph Robbins, of Illinois, as the one Mason in 
all the world whose opinion upon the standing and legitimacy 
of the several grand lodges throughout the world was authori- 
tative. I know of no one equipped to fill his place in this par- 
ticular. It is easy to comment, but few of us have time or 
inclination to delve in history for the facts. The word I would 
utter in tribute of Brother Robbins is, May there be one some- 
where in the Masonic world, who will so grow in Masonic 
learning that he can take the place of the distinguished brother, 
now raised to the all perfect degree." 

Stephen James Chadwick, Washington. 



"Dr. Robbins was hardly the inferior of Mackey in general 
Masonic knowledge, or of Pike as a writer ' of forcible and 
classical English in which that knowledge could be expressed. 

"But I am not writing today to extol the abilities of a great 
Freemason, who stands in no need of my own or of any other 
man's panegyric. His writings will live and will form an abid- 
ing claim to the recognition of his merits as a teacher of the 
craft. The* object I have most at heart, in these hasty lines, 
is to mourn the loss of a dear and valued friend, and to asso- 
ciate with my own, in this imperfect tribute to his memory, the 
names of William James Hughan and W. J. Chetwode Craw- 
ley, by each of whom our deceased brother was as greatly es- 
teemed and as deeply beloved as he was by the undersigned." 

Robert Freke Gould. England. 



INTRODUCTION 



Brethren of the Grand Lodge: 

The report on correspondence goes out this year with the emblems 
of sorrow in the foreground. Our eminent brother, who for so many- 
years has led and instructed us through his charming "reports, lies silent 
in the tomb. We admired Brother Robbins for his splendid form, we 
respected him for his profound intellect, we loved him for his affectionate 
heart, and we mourn for his untimely death. For the twenty-one years 
last past, and at intevals for eight previous years, or for twenty-nine years 
in all, he had given us in his incomparable style a clear, comprehensive 
and instructive exposition of the chief items of interest in the Masonic 
world. He not only recorded the action taken in the various grand 
jurisdictions, but he also gave us such enlightened comments thereon that 
his reports were veritable cyclopedias of facts, and reliable text books 
for study and for a complete education in what is best and most valuable 
in the institution. But disease laid its relentless hand upon him, the 
slow but certain ravages of an incurable and painful malady — borne with 
uncomplaining fortitude and resignation — so sapped his great vitality that 
after he had reviewed the proceedings of one jurisdiction and just com- 
menced another of this year's report he was compelled to relinquish the 
work. A successor had to be found. By his choice, and the partiality 
of the Grand Master, the mantle of a giant fell ,upon the narrow shoul- 
ders of the writer and fairly smothered him in its folds, for he realized 
the magnitude of the labor and the inadequacy of the time in which to 
perform it. He also keenly felt his lack of equipment for the work, and 
his entire want of experience. Although he knew that his best efforts 
must inevitably suffer by comparison with what had gone before, a sense 
of duty compelled a reluctant acceptance of the undertaking, and he fin- 
ishes the task with the compensating thought that by his failure the way 
has been made easier for his successor. 

The circumstances precluded the possibility of any considerable change 
of plans for the report, whatever the preference of the reviewer might 



10 APPENDIX: — PART I. 



be, and compelled adherence in the main to the former methods, and also 
suggested the necessity of utilizing any assistance that might be available. 

With the help of brethren who promptly came at my call sixty-four 
of the sixty-nine jurisdictions with which Illinois is in communication 
have been reviewed in this report, six of them for two years, making a to- 
tal of seventy reviews. Five jurisdictions are not reported. Cuba, because 
the writer cannot read Spanish, and England, Queensland, Victoria, and 
Western Australia, because for some reason unknown to us their pro- 
ceedings failed to come to hand. We especially regret the absence of 
England and Queensland, because we would be glad to see and record a 
little advance towards a settlement of the friction which has come to 
trouble them, and which we are confident will be settled at last by the 
recognition of the sovereignty of Queensland in its own proper .domain 
by the mother grand lodge. 

The brethren of Utah will be glad to see that they are held in affec- 
tionate remembrance by M.W. Bro. A. D. Gash, past grand master of 
that state, but now a resident of Chicago and a member of Edgewater 
Lodge, whose poetic hand they will readily recognize in the review of 
that jurisdiction, a kindly service which he undertook at the committee's 
request, and for which he has our fraternal thanks. 

To the members of the guild we make our best bow and extend a 
timid but cordial hand. We feel like an unbidden guest in a distin- 
guished company without appropriate apparel. We ask only a tempo- 
rary place at the board and a very small space at the foot of the table. If 
the promise of years and strength were ours we would gladly strive 
for recognition among your honored ranks, for the work is inspiring and 
the opportunity for service large. 

We regret that time has failed us to make that careful study of the 
trend of events as disclosed by the reports under review, which would 
enable Us to express a definite opinion of the general situation. 

From the hurried reading we have been able to make we believe that 
there is good reason for an optimistic view of Masonry's future, though 
we confess to some misgivings in certain directions. 

Conservative by nature and growing more so with advancing years, 
we are inclined to deprecate sincerely the tendencies towards innovations 



masonic correspondence:. 11 

and modernization which crop out from time to time. We firmly be- 
lieve, however, that the great heart of the fraternity is in the right 
place and that it beats true to the principles and landmarks which the 
fathers fixed for our government. Some of the younger brethren fail 
to take themselves and the institution as seriously as they should. They 
are quite too prone to be carried away with vague notions of universality, 
general grand bodies, society functions, high sounding titles, and the 
spectacular displays which in the name and under the guise of Masonry 
obtrude themselves on their attention. 

But we hope that patient forbearance and kindly advice on the part 
of the older and more conservative brethren, and the added wisdom which 
years and experience will bring, will turn the ambition of these young 
enthusiasts into broader and better fields and promote a deeper study of 
the fundamentals, a better understanding of the meaning of Masonry, 
and a nobler service to humanity. Fraternally, 

Edward Cook, Committee. 
Chicago, Sept. 20, 1909. 



12 APPENDIX PART I. 



Some Planks for a Sound Masonic Platform. 

The Ancient Landmarks. 
The conclusion of the congress is that the ancient landmarks are 
those fundamental principles which characterize Masonry as defined by 
the Charges of a Freemason, and without which the institution cannot 
be identified as Masonry, combined with the essentials of the unwritten 
language by which brethren distinguish each other as Masons. — Masonic 
Congress, Chicago, 1893. 



"The Body of Masonry" — "The Original Plan of Masonry" — "The 
Principles and Groundwork of Masonry." 

The groundwork of Masonry is the reciprocal acceptance and sym- 
bolical teaching by God-acknowledging men of certain obligations de- 
rived from the moral law and recognized as being due to their Creator, 
to themselves and to each other; the assumption of these obligations in 
substance, form and manner to confer the Masonic status being only pos- 
sible within the body of certain organizations called lodges, existing by 
virtue of warrants or charters from a representative grand lodge con- 
sisting of and formed by the masters and wardens of all the lodges in 
communication therewith, with the grand master of its own elec- 
tion at the head; which grand lodge is the supreme power of the juris- 
diction which it occupies, save as constrained by the ancient landmarks, 
the paramount, irrepealable, unchangeable law of Masonry; and when 
thus lawfully assumed these obligations are a perpetual guarantee — apart 
from the temporary distinctions of master, fellow and apprentice — of 
an absolute equality of rights, benefits, privileges and eligibilities. — 
Joseph Robbins. 



"Lest We Forget." 

"There should be no bookkeeping for or on account of a sick brother. 
Masonry and money are things apart. This is an age of money above 
all things it seems. Let Masonry be the great light forever reminding 
us in our mad scramble that wealth will count for nothing in that scale 
where a widow's tear weighs more than the purest gold." — Stephen J. 
Chadwick. 



Impudent Assumption, No Right. 
"The impudent assumption of the right by the grand council of the 
thirty-third degree to constitute and administer symbolic lodges of A.F. 
and A.M. is a right which supreme councils of the thirty-third degree 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 13 

never possessed and which we believe they have never before attempted 
to exercise." — Henry L. Palmer. 



"Charity Is Kind." 

"The association of Masons in a lodge in no manner relieves them 
from their individual obligations, and when they act as a lodge their 
duty, and therefore that of the lodge, is precisely the same as that of 
the individual. Masonic relief is never purchased or sold and therefore 
never creates a debt.'* — Josiali H. Drummond. 



From the Master's Installation Engagements. 
"You promise to respect genuine brethren, and to discountenance im- 
postors and all dissenters from the original plan of Masonry?" 

"You admit that it is not in the power of any man or body of men 
to make innovations in the body of Masonry?" 

"You admit that no new lodge shall be formed without permission 
from the grand lodge, and that no countenance be given to any irregular 
lodge, or to any person clandestinely intiated therein, being contrary to 
the Ancient Charges of Freemasonry?" 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 



ON 



Masonic Correspondence 

1909 



EDWARD COOK, P. G. M. 



ALABAMA, 1908. 

8Sth Annual. Montgomery. December 1. 

A half-tone portrait of the grand master, Hugh S. D. Mallory, forms 
the frontispiece of this volume. Five past grand masters were present 
and thirty-two members of the diplomatic corps, the latter including W. 
W. Daffin, of Grove Hill, the representative of Illinois, who was 
appointed grand lecturer at the session under review. Grand Master 
♦Mallory announced the death of Past Grand Master John Gideon Har- 
ris, eminent in military and civil life, aged seventy-four ; and of Joseph 
H. Edwards, senior grand deacon, a physician active in educational mat- 
ters, whose passing occurred at the early age of thirty-seven, cutting 
short a life of great promise. Deceased also was Bro. Jesse M. Car- 
Michael, a member of the committee on jurisprudence. 

The grand master reported no less than sixty-seven decisions cover- 
ing nearly thirteen pages of the proceedings. Fifty-two were approved 
without qualification. Of the remainder several were subject to verbal 
criticism but without dissent from the main points at issue, and one was 
deprived of the quality of an edict not because the committee on juris- 
prudence had any criticism to make as to what was declared in the de- 
cision, for they confessed that they had none, but because they thought 
it unwise to attempt to lay down certain specified rules for fear that 
they would have a misleading effect upon the lodges. The decision 
(No. 33) was as follows: 

33. While it is well established that the lodge may order a new trial 
on grounds specified in our Masonic Manual; this right should be wisely 
limited and exercised. Evidence which was known and accessible to the 



18 APPENDIX PART I. 



lodge, or to the accused if in his favor, and which could have been pro- 
cured and produced at the trial with reasonable diligence, but was not, 
should not, as a rule, be used as a basis for a new trial. 

Inasmuch as the decision was to narrow and simplify the grounds 
upon which a lodge might properly grant a new trial (a proceeding un- 
known to the Illinois code), the position of the committee does not seem 
to us well taken ; but it serves a useful purpose in calling attention to 
the growing and mischievous paternalism which fears to trust the judg- 
ment of the lodges in directions where self-reliance should be encouraged 
if they are to be aught but automatons. 

We append some of the other decisions which were approved by the 
grand lodge, retaining for reference their original numbers : 

15. A Master Mason's lodge may be opened without first opening on 
either the E. A. or F. C. degrees. 

16. A lodge may elect a member thereof to the office of W.M. who 
has filled the station of warden, either in this grand jurisdiction or in 
any other grand jurisdiction recognized by this grand jurisdiction. 

19. The newly elected master of a lodge declined to qualify or act. 
The newly elected wardens were duly installed. Thereafter the lodge 
applied to the grand master for dispensation to elect a worshipful mas- 
ter. Held : The grand master was without authority to grant the dis- 
pensation. The dispensation might have issued on proper application, 
prior to the installation of the wardens, but the wardens having been 
installed, the senior warden would fill the East until next regular elec- 
tion of officers, and at lodge meetings he would call on some brother to 
occupy the West for that meeting. 

20. The W.M. in appointing committees of investigation on petitions 
for initiation or affiliation, should not withhold from the knowledge of 
the lodge the names of such committee. The W.M. acts for the lodge in 
appointing these committees, and the lodge has the right to know the 
names of those appointed. 

25. A brother dimitted from his lodge, and made application for 
membership in another lodge, accompanied by his dimit. He was rejected. 
He then petitioned his original lodge for membership. Before acting on 
the petition, this lodge must have the consent of the lodge rejecting him. 

No. 15 is contrary to Illinois practice, and finds its principal defense 
as "a saver of time." We are of the opinion that in no way can a grand 
lodge take a more efficient step towards careful, accurate and uniform 
work than by requiring that the full ceremonies of opening and closing 
in regular succession through the degrees to the highest one used on the 
occasion shall be practiced at every meeting of the lodge. Those who 
have witnessed the steady growth of interest in the work in this state 
and the gratifying approach to uniformity and have studied the causes 
for the success that has been achieved, will unite in endorsing the views 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 1? 

herein expressed that a strict and full adherence :: the complete opening 

ceremonies is one of the most potent factors in insuring accuracy in all 
parts ::' the work. If the ntere saving of time :r the avoidance of 
monotonous reiterations is the preA-ailing argument, why should not the 
Master, when he knows from persona' knowledge that ah present are 
blaster Masons, declare the lodge :;e::ed in any ::' the three degree? 
without any form or ceremony? 

No. 16 is in accordance with our law on the subject and needs no 
defense. 

Xo. 19 develops a situation which could not jccur in Illinois, because 
our law requires that the installation must begin with the Master. 

Xo. 20 conforms to the Illinois practice and announces what we be- 
lieve to be sound doctrine. 

No. 23 appears to be based on the idea that a lodge obtains jurisdic- 
tion over a brother by rejecting his petition for affiliation This is good 
doctrine in case of a profane applying for initiation but is entirely 

opposed to our views :: the rights of a brother. 

The grand master issued seventeen dispense::: as for the :': —nation of 
new ledges. One was continued, one was given for the re-organiza- 
tion of a lodge, four for removal, five to elect officers whose places were 

made vacant by removal from the jurisdiction and eleven to elect officers 
at other than the usual : ::.e 

A number of dispensations were given :■: confer degrees :.:: ::' time — 
'"always requiring good reasons therefor." — but a dispensation to author- 
ize conferring three degrees upon one candidate the same day was re- 
fused. Upon this he wisely remarks, "it is ::: rften the case that a 

brother does not apply himself to learn the work after he has ; • • 
through the degrees and it is of great importance that he should be re- 
quired to have suitable proficiency before being passed or rah- 

He gives the details of the authorization oi the purchase. mortgaging 
and sale of lodge property, remarks very pleasantly about his 
Masonic conferences, installations, dedications and notes special communi- 
cations of the grand lodge to place thirteen corner-stones. H« fers 
the appointment of brethren to be W.M. and J.W. of a lodge till the 
next annual communication, but does not sc - the whereabouts 
whatabouts ::' the S.W. in the meantime nor inf what became of 

his constitutional rights. He commends the services of the committee on 
widows' and orphans' home, and felicitates the brethren upon the pros 
that their efforts are promising t >s in raising the nec 

funds for the benefaction. 



20 APPENDIX PART I. 



His address gives abundant evidence that he had a busy year, and that 
Masonry profited by his assiduous and efficient efforts. 

The Masonic home committee reported the receipt of $11,233.96 from 
contributions made in answer to their appeal, which, added to money 
previously received, made a total of $22,797.64 available cash in hand, in 
addition to which pledges to the amount of $13,350.00 were received ; 
truly a fine showing of voluntary donations. They also report the proffer 
of seventy acres of land and a cash contribution of $12,000 from a town 
desiring to secure for itself the location of the home. The brethren of 
Alabama have evidently gone about the establishment of a home for the 
needy in a wise, really charitable and truly Masonic way. 

The committee on limited or perpetual jurisdiction over rejected can- 
didates, after saying that 

The law in this particular in the fifty states and territories (and the 
District of Columbia) in the United States is as follows: 

Perpetual, 14 ; ten years, 8 ; five years, 9 ; three years, 1 ; one year, 12 ; 
six months, 6. 

It therefore appears that thirty-six states and territories fix a time 
limit. The states with perpetual jurisdiction are Alabama, Connecticut, 
Delaware. Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jer- 
sey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas and West Vir- 
ginia. 

The majority of precedents is for a time limitation. 

Recommended the submission to the lodges of a constitutional amend- 
ment, limiting the jurisdiction of Alabama lodges over rejected candi- 
dates to three years. 

On motion of Bro. Zimmerman the grand lodge adopted the follow- 
ing resolutions : 

Resolved, That the ordering, soliciting, printing, circulating or distribu- 
ting of any parody of the esoteric work of Masonry for advertising 
purposes be declared a Masonic offense and any Master Mason so offend- 
ing shall be subject to discipline. 

Resolved, That any lodge having jurisdiction of such offense which 
fails to take any action thereon, may subject itself to discipline. 

The record discloses the following proof of the gallantry of our Ala- 
bama brethren : 

The grand lodge was called from labor to refreshment and an inter- 
esting episode was the appearance of Mrs. Ellen Carnot Dexter, Past 
Worthy Matron of Elizabeth Armstrong Chapter No. 10, O. E. S., and 
Grand Worthy Matron of the Grand Chapter O. E. S. of Alabama, with 
the ladies of Elizabeth Armstrong Chapter, bearing salutation to the grand 
lodge and beautiful flowers to the grand master and grand secretary. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 21 



The address of Mrs. Dexter was happily responded to by the grand 
master in behalf of himself and the grand secretary. 

The occasion was highly interesting and enjoyable. Upon the retire- 
ment of the ladies the grand lodge was called from refreshment to labor. 

Chartered lodges on the roll, 1908 484 

Represented at the meet'ng 391 

Number of members 21,222 

The report of the committee on foreign correspondence is by the able 
writer, Bro. William Y. Titcomb, who gives seven of his valuable page? 
to a review of our proceedings for 1907. His summary of Grand Master 
Allen's address shows a careful and appreciative reading, and he notes 
his reference to new lodges instituted, halls dedicated, corner-stones placed, 
the relief extended to California sufferers, schools of instruction and the 
subdivision of the state into fifty instead of the thirty previous districts. 
He characterizes the grand secretary's report as "a business-like document 
evincing careful preparation," and says of the report of the trustees of 
the homes that it "was very satsfactory." 

He refers very pleasantly to the complimentary reception accorded to 
M.W. Bro. John M. Pearson, at the completion of fifty years of active 
and influential service in Masonry, and notices the introduction of M.W. 
Bro. Abram Dale Gash, P.G.M. of Utah. 

He quotes the report of cur committee on correspondence adverse to 
the recognition of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, and says of the 
report that it is short but comprehensive, giving well founded and cogent 
reasons for such denial. 

Of the work of M.W. Bro. Robbins he says: 

To intimate that the report on correspondence presented by Past 
Grand Master Joseph Robbins, chairman of the committee, is able, would 
but feebly express our impressions regarding it. It is masterly. It is as full 
of information as an "egg is of meat." If his brethren, who have access 
thereto, fail to read it, they will miss lots of instruction. 

He transcribes in full the special report giving the lists of Grand 
Lodges entitled to full recognition — to qualified recognition and to no 
recognition — and adds that "A lively sense of justice pervades all of 
Brother Robbins' utterances." He concludes by saying that he leaves 
"bushels of good things unnoticed." 

Hugh S. D. Mallory. Selma, grand master; George A. Beauchamp, 

Montgomery, grand secretary. 



22 APPENDIX PART I. 



ALBERTA, 1909. 

4th Annual. Lethbridge. May 26. 

This small but neatly printed pamphlet contains as a frontispiece a 
half-tone portrait of the out-going grand master, M.W. Bro. Rev. G. H. 
Hogbin. 

The proceedings of the annual communication are preceded by the 
minutes of three special meetings, the first at Lethbridge, June 9, 1908, 
to lay the corner-stone of a public school building ; the second at Frank, 
Sunday, April 25, 1909, to attend the funeral of M.W. Bro. Thomas 
Alexander McLean, past grand master of the Grand Lodge of Prince 
Edward Island, and the third at Calgary, April 26, 1909, to dedicate a 
Masonic temple. 

At the annual session, nineteen grand officers, four past grand mas- 
ters, four past grand officers, twenty-six representatives of other grand 
lodges, sixty-two past masters and the representatives of twenty-eight 
constituent lodges were present. 

After the grand lodge was opened, the mayor of Lethbridge was in- 
troduced, and in a short address welcomed the grand lodge to his city, 
and extended the freedom of the same to the brethren. Grand Master 
Hogbin delivered his annual address, in which, in speaking of the dedi- 
cation of the Masonic hall at Calgary, he said : 

One feature in particular in connection with this hall is the estab- 
lishment of a Masonic club open to all Masons to join, which supplies 
especially in a large city a want largely felt. I would submit such action 
to the thought and consideration of the brethren of the other large towns 
and cities in the province. Wholesome amusement, friendly intercourse 
and Masonic instruction are not light things to be neglected where they 
can be obtained freed from possible temptations for so many of our 
young brethren, who in our large centers are living far from home in 
boarding houses or lodgings, to say nothing of the transient visitors con- 
tinually passing through our midst. 

In regard to the suspension of brethren for the non-payment of dues, 
he said : 

It is often the best thing for the brother personally, that he should 
be suspended if dues accrue for any length of time against him, as it pre- 
vents them from piling up so that they reach what amounts to an im- 
possibility for him to pay, no dues being required during the suspended 
period. And on the other hand, if circumstances are such as to make 
the brethren of the lodge feel a disinclination to suspend one of their 
number, they have the remedy in their own hands — they can remit the 
dues altogether. If the reason for non-suspension is of sufficient weight 
to compel them to refrain from taking the drastic action, my opinion is, 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 23 



that that same reason should be quite sufficiently weighty to allow the 
brother to vote or t© hold office. Either keep him in good standing al- 
together or else suspend him altogether, and not leave him neither one 
thing or the other. 

He did not render the usual number of decisions, and said under the 
head of "Rulings :" 

One question was submitted to me of some importance and which 
was by no means easy to answer. It was this : "In case of a Masonic 
trial, can the worshipful master of the lodge act as counsel for the de- 
fense of the accused?" 

After long consideration and consultation with others I gave the defi- 
nite ruling, "No." I think the question is of importance and would sug- 
gest that it be referred to the committee on jurisprudence, as it is quite 
within your power, brethren of grand lodge, to make a ruling over- 
riding the one given by me for guidance on any future occasion. Per- 
haps I may be allowed to briefly state my reasons for ruling as I did. 
In the first place, the W.M. in a lodge stands in a peculiar position with 
relation to the grand lodge. To him the grand lodge looks to see that 
all things, Masonic trials included, are done in order and according to 
constitutional usage and Masonic law. Should any breach of these oc- 
cur, the grand lodge holds the W.M., if present in his lodge, absolutely 
responsible. When present in the lodge he cannot divest himself of that 
responsibility, and in points relating to procedure and law he is the con- 
stituted authority to whom his brethren look for rulings, subject of 
course, to the appeal to the G.M. or grand lodge. Further than that, in 
his position as master he has solemnly obligated himself to conduct the 
affairs of the lodge with absolute impartiality, and I cannot conceive that 
taking the position of counsel for the defense is compatible with that 
oath. 

We do not remember having seen the above question passed upon be- 
fore, and are of the opinion that the grand master was correct in his 
diagnosis of the case. That he believes that the past masters belong to 
the ancient and honorable order of "has-beens," is shown by the fol- 
lowing: 

Another question easier to answer has cropped up more than once, 
and that is the relative positions of the past masters and the wardens of 
the lodge in the absence of the master. The older and experienced of you 
brethren know of course what the decision is according to our con- 
stitution and ceremonial of institution. In the absence of the W.M. the 
S.W.. and in the absence of those two, the J.W. rules the lodge. I only 
mention it and the reason for the requirement for the sake of guidance 
to the younger lodges. The past master has no more inherent authority 
in the lodge itself, as a right, than the youngest Master Mason. He has 
supposedly done his good work during the term of his office and then 
has "retired into the multitude," as the words of our installation cere- 
mony put it. The wardens are told when installed that they, in succes- 
sion, may be called upon to rule the lodge, and as T mentioned above, 
one reason, and perhaps the strongest for the regulation, is that grand 
lodge must have some one brother in the lodge whom it can hold re- 
sponsible for the due and proper observance of its rules at all times. 



24 APPENDIX PART I. 



The grand lodge in its constitution holds that the wardens are the proper 
persons to carry the responsibilty and not an indefinite person in the 
shape of the senior past master present or even the junior past master. 

Under the head of "Our Mother Grand Lodge," he remarked: 
At its last annual communication our mother Grand Lodge of Mani- 
toba voted a sum of $1,000 from its general funds to this grand lodge 
and also to the other daughter, the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. The 
disposition of this money remains for you to decide. I suggest that a 
very sincere and cordial resolution of thanks should be drafted and sent 
to the Grand Lodge of Manitoba in time to reach the secretary before its 
next annual communication, next month. 

He closed his address with the following beautiful sentiment : 
When Masonry makes us feel that an injustice done to another is 
done to us because we are brothers, when it makes us realize that where 
evil is there exists the call to put it down, when we feel a compelling 
power to go out into the highways and hedges and do what we can to 
relieve the distressed, the fatherless and widow, when vice, impurity, 
blasphemy and any other wickedness sound the trumpet call to each of 
us to do what we can to put them down, then and then only shall we be 
doing what our great and glorious institution expects of us, and the 
sooner we shall realize the great truths on which our fraternity is 
founded — the Loving Fatherhood of the Author of our being and the 
Brotherhood of mankind everywhere. 

Grand Treasurer N. J. Lindsay reports expenditures of $4,900 and a 
cash balance of $2,782. 

Grand Secretary George Macdonald in his report stated that during 
the year fourteen lodges were constituted and six others instituted. He 
enumerated the special dispensations granted by the grand master, in- 
cluding thirteen to wear regalia at divine service and two to wear re- 
galia at Masonic "at homes." One dispensation was for a lodge U.D. 
"to work until constituted under charter, original dispensation having 
been lost by fire." Another was for a lodge "to work until charter re- 
placed, original charter having been destroyed by fire." Here in Illinois 
we believe that the action of the grand lodge or grand master in grant- 
ing a charter or dispensation is not invalidated by the destruction of 
the document certifying to the grant, just as we believe that if a com- 
mission or certificate issued to a grand lodge officer is burned up that 
the officer's title to his position is just as complete as before the de- 
struction of the parchment. 

In the report of the librarian is noted the receipt from the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois of a cloth bound copy of its proceedings for 1908, 
and "The History of the Laureation of R.W. Bro. Fay Hempstead/' 

A handsome chain collar was presented M.W. Bro. Judge H. C. 
Taylor, past grand master, and the representatives of sister grand 
lodges were received and welcomed by the grand master, and fraternal 
greetings exchanged. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 25 

A special committee of board of general purposes on examination 
of visitors submitted the following report, which was received and 
adopted : 

1. That each lodge provide visitors' tickets, on which the visiting 
brother shall state his name, address, lodge, where situated, secretary's 
name and address, and the name of the grand lodge under which his 
lodge holds jurisdiction. That each secretary mail immediately to the 
secretary of the visitor's lodge, a suitable letter informing them of his 
visit. These forms to be furnished the lodges by the grand secretary 
so that thty may be uniform. 

2. That the examining committee in every case request documentary 
evidence showing the visiting brother to be in good standing in his 
lodge. The absence of documentary evidence should, however, not de- 
prive the visiting brother of admission to the lodge if his examination 
is otherwise satisfactory. 

3. Tyler's oath as follows : 

I , do hereby and hereon solemnly and sincerely 

swear that I have been regularly initiated, passed and raised to the 
sublime degree of Master Mason, in a just and legally constituted lodge 
of such ; that I do not stand suspended or expelled, and I know of no 
reason why I should not hold Masonic communication with my brethren. 

That this- be made uniform throughout the jurisdiction. 

4. That the visiting brother be given a general examination with 
regard to Freemasonry, its nature, aims, objects and symbolism, also 
a general description of lodges, its officers, furniture and their situation, 
and any other information that will tend to prove his bona-Hdes. 

5. That a rigid examination in the work of the several degrees be 
given every visitor. This does not necessarily imply the giving of all 
the examinations but sufficient to prove to the entire satisfaction of the 
examining board that the visitor is entitled to Masonic recognition. 

6. The examining board to be composed of a past master or other 
experienced Mason, and a young Mason — the latter for the purpose of 
qualifying him to conduct examinations. 

7. That the D.D.G.M.'s on the occasion of their official visits, be in- 
structed to see that these instructions are carried out, and if necessary 
to hold a lodge of instruction in examinations. 

The committee on jurisprudence, in reporting as to the standing of 
Brother Finch in relation to the resolution of the grand lodge which 
purported to give him the title of past master, very sensibly said : 

As to the question that the grand lodge has no power to make any 
brother a past master. This title is defined in the constitution as apply- 
ing to a brother who has been elected master of a lodge and who has 
served for twelve months in that position. It is one obtained as a con- 
sequence of the vote of brethren in lodge assembled. In our opinion 
the motion passed by grand lodge was constitutionally wrong and should 
be expunged, and the grand secretary directed to inform Perfect ion 
Lodge that Brother Finch is not a past master and must not bo so 
returned. 



26 APPENDIX PART I. 



In the report of the committee on fraternal dead appears the name 
of Brother Loyal L. Munn, past grand secretary of Illinois. The 
report of the committee on grand master's address contains the follow- 
ing, which has our earnest endorsement : 

With regard to the dispensations issued, the committee are of the 
opinion that it would be advisable for grand master to refuse dispensa- 
tion to wear regalia at "at homes." Your committee can see no good 
reason for such and feel that the best interests of the craft can best 
be served by refusal of such applications. 

J. T. Macdonald, of Calgary, was elected grand master; George 
Macdonald, of Calgary, was re-elected grand secretary. 

There is no report on correspondence. 



ARIZONA, 1908. 

27th Annual. Prescott. November 17. 

The volume opens with a half-tone portrait of Cyrus G. Jones, grand 
master, whose fine strong face prepares us to expect the terse business- 
like address in which he reported to the grand lodge the salient points 
of his administration. 

The lapel of his coat bears evidence that he is more than willing that 
his brethren shall know that he is familiar with sands even hotter than 
those of Arizona. 

The book also contains cuts of a front view of the Masonic Temple 
at Prescott — a beautiful and solid building — and of the interior of the 
hall of Aztlan Lodge No. 1 of Prescott, dedicated by the grand lodge 
during its session. 

There were present nine past grand masters and twenty-four repre- 
sentatives of other grand jurisdictions, including M.W. Bro. Artemus 
Louden Grow, standing for Illinois. 

In the grand master's report on necrology he is able to say that "the 
ranks of our grand lodge have not been invaded by the angel of death 
during the year, save in the single instance of Bro. Charles David 
Haney, W. grand standard bearer." He gives considerable space to 
correspondence between himself and the grand master and grand secre- 
tary of Texas, growing out of a case where relief was furnished by a 
lodge in Arizona to a member of a Texas lodge who was severely injured 
in a railroad accident. Large expenses were incurred and as both lodges 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 27 

had small membership and were not strong financially the pecuniary 
burden was a serious matter. There was no preliminary agreement or 
arrangement as to payment of these expenses. Arizona took the ground 
that the Texas lodge was justly indebted and morally bound to repay 
the outlay and that if unable to pay, the Grand Lodge of Texas should 
reimburse it for the expenditure. 

Texas on the contrary maintained that while she would gladly see her 
lodges meet all proper demands for relief, she believed that "Masonic 
charity attaches as an individual responsibility and does not spring from 
lodge organization and that it is unwise to attempt its administration by 
rules and regulations." The correspondence was in the main a renewal 
of the discussion which was prominent a few years ago under the head 
of the "Wisconsin plan," and which resulted in a pretty general con- 
sensus of opinion, in which Illinois concurred, that in the absence of any 
definite arrangement extending Masonic relief does not create a collectible 
liability. The worthiness and need of the recipient, the ability of the 
helper and the conscientious discharge of acknowledged duty and obliga- 
tion are the factors to be considered. As the lamented Drummond put it, 
"Masonic relief is never purchased or sold, and therefore never creates 
a debt." 

The date of meeting of the grand lodge was changed from the second 
Tuesday in November to the second Tuesday in February. 

The grand lodge adopted a form of identification card and authorized 
the grand secretary to provide lodges with a necessary supply of them. 

The grand master authorized the grand secretary 

To file with the territorial secretary the emblem of Freemasonry, the 
square and compass with the letter "G," as provided by chapter 30 of the 
session laws of the territory of Arizona, 1905, entitled an act for the pro- 
tection of societies, etc. I had learned that there were clandestine lodges 
within our borders and this precaution seemed necessary for our protec- 
tion and I would recommend that any imposter infringing on the rights 
of Masonry by use of our emblem be prosecuted, as every effort should 
be made to rid our jurisdiction of all illegal bodies and imposters. 

And the grand secretary reported as follows : 

REGISTRATION OF SQUARE AND COMPASS. 

In accordance with instructions from the M.W. Grand Master. I 
made out and forwarded to the secretary of the territory the following: 

Office of the Grand Secretary 
Grand Lodge of F. & A. M. of Arizona. 

Tucson, Arizona, August 10. 1908. 
To the Honorable Secretary of the Territory of Arizona: 

Sir: Under the provisions of Chapter 30 of the Session Laws of the 
Twenty-third Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Arizona, entitled 



28 APPENDIX PART I. 



"An Act to prevent persons from unlawfully using or wearing the Insig- 
nia, Distinctive Ribbons, Membership Rosette or Button of Benevolent, 
Fraternal or Secret Societies or Organizations," the Grand Lodge of Free 
and Accepted Masons of Arizona does hereby file for record in your office 
the emblem used by it and its subordinate bodies as well as by its mem- 
bers, the same being a Square and Compass with the letter "G," of which 
the following is a fac-simile : 




As witness my hand and seal of the Grand Lodge of Free and 
Accepted Masons of Arizona, at the place and on the day first 
above written : 

(grand lodge seal) George J. Roskruge, 

Grand Secretary. 

The writer has long been of the opinion that Masonry of the heart and 
head is a better possession and more safely guarded than certificate or 
pocket Masonry, and that methods for preventing imposture should be 
confined to the craft and not delegated to legislatures and magistrates. 

A request for recognition was received from the Grand Lodge "Cos- 
mos" of the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, and was referred to the com- 
mittee on correspondence, who asked for and was granted further time 
in which to report. 

Let us hope that this committee will secure complete information and 
be able to report how many grand lodges there are in Mexico and the 
validity of their respective and conflicting claims to regularity. 

No decisions were rendered because the grand master had been able 
to answer all questions by reference to the constitution or some former 
decision made and approved by the grand lodge. 

The grand secretary reported nineteen lodges in the jurisdiction with 
a membership of 1,536, a gain of 125 during the year. 

We give space to the following to show the attitude of Arizona on 
the subject of fixing and publishing a ritual: 

Bro. P.G.M. Morris Goldwater read the following and handed a copy 
to each member of the grand lodge : 

AN ADDRESS. 

To the Great Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the United 
States of America, through their Representatives in Grand Lodge 
Assembled: 

The Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free 
and Accepted Masons of the State of Tennessee, believing the use of 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 29 



cipher rituals of the symbolic degrees of Masonry to be unmasonic, 
illegal and fraught with danger to Freemasonry, has, by edict, forbidden 
their purchase, sale or use within its jurisdiction, and has also invited its 
sister grand lodges to unite with it in a resolute purpose to suppress this 
baleful and unmasonic practice, and it rejoices in the favorable responses 
thereto received from the great majority of the American grand jurisdic- 
tions, but this grand body has heard with regret and astonishment that 
some grand lodges in the United States not only do not forbid, but, on 
the contrary, expressly authorize the use of printed rituals, purporting 
to describe the secret work of the symbolic degrees, and even print and 
furnish copies thereof to their subordinates, whereby the hidden mysteries 
of Freemasonry may be unlawfully divulged. 

Some publish specious arguments in excuse for so doing, as did the 
Grand Orient of France for its action in removing the Bible from its 
altars. Such conduct and action in the one case as in the other, is wholly 
repugnant to the work and genius of the Freemasonry of Tennessee, as 
we have received it from the fathers, and are bound to transmit it to 
posterity. It is a plain breach of obligation and duty in letter and spirit, 
and a course not open for argument. Our fraternal relation to these 
grand bodies, however, suggests that possibly such contrary views and 
practices may spring from different systems of Freemasonry, built upon 
different foundations, having different rituals and obligations, and not of 
the same origin, faith or practice. Surely their ways are not our ways, 
and their landmarks cannot be ours. 

In view of this, and that no cause of misunderstanding or complaint 
may exist against the Grand Lodge of Tennessee for any course it may be 
compelled to pursue, this grand lodge hereby declares its abiding faith 
in, and unswerving loyalty to, the following fundamental tenets of Free- 
masonry received, maintained and cherished, as we have ever learned and 
taught, by all Free and Accepted Masons always and everywhere : 

1. Freemasonry has as essentials certain secrets of ritual which it 
forever conceals and never reveals to any persons in the world except its 
own members. 

2. These ancient mysteries are communicated only by the instructive 
tongue to the attentive ear and are safely lodged in the faithful breast ; 
and any other mode of communication in Ancient Craft Masonry is most 
positively forbidden in solemn form and manner. 

3. So likewise is forbidden the writing, printing or marking in any 
manner, of these secrets or any sign or letter thereof, whereby the same 
becomes legible or intelligible to any person, lest these secrets might be- 
come known to the profane. 

4. No individual Mason is exempt from the obligation of profound 
secrecy, and no human power can authorize him to write, print or mark 
Masonic secrets in any manner whatsoever. 

5. These secrets are ancient landmarks of Freemasonry and no body 
of men, inside or outside of lodge or grand lodge, has power to make 
innovations in Ancient Craft Masonry. 

Standing upon these ancient precepts of our brotherhood we are not 
at liberty to violate them, nor to encourage or sanction their violation 
by others of our fraternity and obligation. We must obey them, and so 



APPENDIX PART I. 



must all within the sacred precincts and the inevitable consequences of 
disobedience must rest upon those who will not obey. It is no excuse or 
justification for any, that men are eager to break these laws, or that men 
have broken them before, or that in other degrees or orders of American 
Masonry cipher rituals may be in common use. Our duty and obliga- 
tion, as Ancient Craft Masons, compel our obedience to these ancient 
regulations. 

In Tennessee we are resolved to remain true to our vows, steadfast 
to our trust, and not to abjure the faith nor suffer innovations in our 
work. And we earnestly and fraternally call upon all our brother Masons 
of the Ancient York Rite, now happily the American Rite of Symbolic 
Masonry, wherever they may reside, to abide with us in our unalterable 
purpose and resolve to preserve the landmarks and keep sacred and in- 
violate the secrets of our beloved fraternity. Hitherto we have all been 
of one mind in this course, and all has gone well with us. The restless 
spirit of change and modern habits of impatience are bringing disorder 
and confusion into our counsels, and unless resisted and routed will, by 
innovation, bring discord to our own ranks and destruction to our peace 
and harmony. Let us all stand together in the ancient ways. 

For the Committee of Jurisprudence, 
Henry H. Ingersoll, 

Secretary. 

Bro. Goldwater also offered the following preamble and resolution, 
which were referred to the special committee which had in charge the re- 
port of the committee on preparing a ritual : 

Whereas, At the annual session of this grand lodge, held at Morenci 
in 1907, a resolution was introduced by W. Bro. J. L. Johnson in refer- 
ence to the "publication of a ritual," which resolution was adopted ; 
now therefore 

Be it Resolved, By the Grand Lodge of Arizona that said resolution 
be and the same is hereby rescinded. 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Arizona now places itself on 
record as being in full sympathy with the principles and sentiments ex- 
pressed by the M.W. Grand Lodge of Tennessee in the address sent 
out by it to the Great Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons. 

Said committee reported as follows : 

Your special committee to whom was referred the resolution intro- 
duced by P.G.M. Bro. Goldwater, in regard to rescinding the reso- 
lution adopted by the last grand lodge in regard to publishing the 
ritual, heartily recommends its adoption. 

We also endorse the sentiments expressed in the report of the com- 
mittee on jurisprudence of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee in regard to 
publishing the ritual and thank them for the interest and position they 
have taken in the matter. 

And the report was concurred in by the grand lodge. The committee 
further reported : 

Your special committee to which was referred the report of the 
committee appointed at the last session of this grand lodge, to pre- 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 31 



pare a ritual for presentation at this grand lodge, begs leave to report 
as follows : 

That we have read the ritual so far as the limited time allowed per- 
mitted, but feel that in a matter of so great importance and vital interest 
to the craft that the time is altogether too short. 

We find, however, that owing to mistakes made in copying, and, we 
suppose, inadvertence on the part of the typewriter, that there are many 
corrections and additions necessary. 

We appreciate and thank Brothers Ormsby, Shaw, and Roskruge 
for the immense labor they have performed, but at the same time we 
recommend that tlie form of ritual as presented be first rewritten and 
corrected as to spelling, punctuation and grammar by a committee con- 
sisting of the M.W. grand master, grand secretary, and grand lec- 
turer, and when so rewritten and corrected that the same shall become 
the ritual of the Grand Lodge of Arizona. 

Also, that there be two copies made, one of which shall be in the 
custody of the grand secretary, and the other for the use of the grand 
lecturer, both of which copies shall at all times be under the discretion 
and at the disposal of the grand master. 

We would also recommend that the grand lecturer appoint three 
or more deputy grand lecturers, the said appointments to be approved 
by the grand master, said deputies to assist the officers of the lodge 
in their respective districts to the end that uniformity in the work, which 
is the object for which we are striving, be accomplished. 

And this report was adopted. 

And so the Grand Lodge of Arizona, after endorsing the impregnable 
and solid position of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, emphatically con- 
demning the writing, printing, or in any way making legible the secret 
work of Masonry, calmly proceeds to authorize the making of two offi- 
cial copies of their ritual. The inconsistency is too broad for character- 
ization and reminds us of the old story of the maid who excused her 
lapse on the ground that "the baby was so small." 

There is no report on correspondence. 

Fletcher Morris Doan, Tombstone, grand master; George J. Rosk- 
ruge, Tucson, grand secretary. 



32 APPENDIX PART I. 



ARKANSAS, 1908. 

66th Annual. Little Rock. November 17. 

This well-printed volume contains full-page portraits of the incoming 
grand master, Edgar A. McCulloch, and Roswell T. Spencer, grand 
representative of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas near the Grand Lodge 
of Illinois, and a vignette half-tone of Grand Secretary Fay Hemp- 
stead. The volume opens with the proceedings of the special meeting 
of the grand lodge held on December 7, 1907, for the laying of the 
corner-stone of the Southern Presbyterian church at Prairie Grove. 

At the annual communication eleven of the seventeen surviving past 
grand masters, and the representatives of forty-six grand jurisdictions 
were present, including Brother Frank L. Wolverton, the envoy of 
Illinois. 

Grand Master M. W. Greeson delivered his annual address, in the 
course of which he said: 

It is my pleasure to report that a kind Providence has left unbroken 
the line of present and past grand officers of this grand lodge, and for 
this mercy we lift our hearts in reverential gratitude. The silent reaper 
has, however, garnered his quota from the brethren of our constituent 
lodges, calling to their final reward 308 of our number. To this we bow 
in sorrow and humble submission, dropping a tear upon the graves of 
our departed dead. 

During the year a large number of decisions were rendered, from 
which we select the following as of more than local interest, which are 
numbered for our own convenience : 

1. A brother should not be declined a dimit for the reason that he 
does not profess a belief in the divinity of Christ. He must believe in 
the existence of one true and living God. 

2. The worshipful master having removed from the jurisdiction of 
his lodge, does not create such a vacancy that the senior warden be- 
comes the master, and amenable only to the grand lodge. If guilty of 
unmasonic conduct, he may be tried the same as if the master still re- 
sided within the jurisdiction of the lodge. 

3. Ques. Can an old and respected citizen, wrw claims to be a Mason 
and to have been senior warden of his lodge during the war, but who 
is unable to present his dimit, be permitted to affiliate? He claims that 
all records of the lodge to which he belonged were destroyed during the 
war. We have written to the grand secretary of the grand lodge in 
whose jurisdiction he resided 'and got the reply that the time is so far 
back no record can be found. We would like to receive him if we could 
legally do so? 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 33 



Ans. Yes, your lodge in its discretion may receive the brother on 
his unsupported statement. The vote which would prevent his initiation 
would bar his affiliation and after all, the question is one of fees. Your 
lodge knows the man and whether his word may be implicitly relied upon. 

4. Qucs. Where the master in open lodge charges a brother with 
Masonic offense — drunkenness — he is duly notified by the secretary and 
appears at the next meeting of the lodge and pleads guilty, but the lodge 
fails to vote the infliction of any punishment, what is to be done? 

Ans. The master may administer such reprimand as he deems proper, 
and of course any member of the lodge may appeal the case to the grand 
lodge. 

5. Qucs. Should a brother who dies after his dimit and petition for 
affiliation have been received and referred be given Masonic burial, or is 
he a wilful non-affiliate? 

Ans. No; he is not a wilful non-affiliate after he petitions the lodge, 
and if otherwise worthy, should be accorded Masonic burial. 

6. Ques. Would a lodge whose charter has been destroyed by fire 
have the right to hold meetings? 

Ans. Yes; such a lodge may meet and transact business in the usual 
way until a duplicate charter is had. 

7. Ques. A brother is granted a dimit and after several years 
presents the same to the lodge granting it, with a petition for affiliation. 
If elected should he be charged with back dues? 

Ans. No ; when the dimit was granted his dues ceased and he is not 
liable for dues until he again affiliates. 

All were approved except No. 3 and No. 4. The former was dis- 
approved on the ground that the official digest covers the question and 
provides that the brother should procure the certificates of the nearest 
brethren of his lodge. In regard to No. 4 the lodge was ordered to send 
up to the grand lodge the proceedings in the case, and that the grand 
lodge inflict the proper punishment. Referring to decision No. 1, we are 
glad to note that our Arkansas brethren require no religious test except a 
belief in God. No. 2 is good law in Illinois, and in addition to it we do 
not allow the master or wardens to resign, dimit or take part in the 
formation of a lodge U.D. Nos. 5, 6 and 7 we think are correctly de- 
cided, and in reference to No. 5 will say that we do not believe that a 
worthy brother who is a non-affiliate should be denied Masonic burial, 
even though he has not applied for affiliation. 

A special report was submitted by the committee on Masonic law 
and usage relative to the matters referred to it by the grand lodge last 
year in relation to Scottish Rite Masonry, recommending the adoption 
of the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That it is not expedient for this committee or for the 
Grand Lodge of Arkansas, to take any action affecting the status, or 

-2 



34 APPENDIX PART I. 



attempting to determine the authenticity of any organization of which 
Masons may become members, unless it should appear in point of fact 
that such other organization is immoral in its tendencies or subversive 
of the principles of Masonry. 

Resolved further, That inasmuch as the southern jurisdiction of the 
Scottish Rite Masons has been in active operation in Arkansas for fifty 
years to the exclusion of all other branches of the Scottish Rite, it is the 
sense of this committee that it will be conducive to harmony if those 
Masons under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas desiring 
the Scottish Rite degrees, should affiliate with the southern jurisdiction. 

The resolutions were adopted. We are of the opinion that any legis- 
lation in regard to any of the so-called higher bodies is out of place in 
a grand lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, and "that it will be con- 
ducive to harmony" to permit no reference to the never ending quarrels 
of the different branches of the Scottish Rite in a grand lodge, save 
such reference and discussion as may be necessary to defend the sov- 
ereignty of Ancient Craft Masonry when it is assailed. 

Grand Master Greeson granted during the year dispensations for ten 
new lodges, and said in regard to the matter : 

I am here led to suggest that, in my opinion, we need to increase the 
membership and the efficiency of the lodges we have, rather than make 
more. It would be better for Masonry, as well as better for any brother 
to be forced to ride miles for his lodge, and even miss some meetings, if 
by so doing the lodge is mad,e more efficient and strong numerically and 
financially. I think that section 4, article 4, of our constitution should 
be changed so that at least double the number now necessary to petition, 
shall be required. I have granted the above petitions for new lodges 
for the reason that our law had been complied with and I did not feel 
that I would be justified in declining, with the recommendation of the 
nearest lodge and the district deputy grand master. 

Under the heading "Felicitation," he said : 

For more than a quarter of a century our grand lodges have known 
the pleasure that comes from an efficient and methodical secretary, the 
most important officer for any deliberative body. Further, from time to 
time, the members have been delighted and enchanted by the charming 
poems that have come from the pen of our Right Worshipful Brother 
Hempstead. These have been of such merit and purity as to attract the 
attention of others. Different Masonic Journals throughout our broad 
land have frequently published his productions with the most favorable 
comment, and finally, on the 5th day of October, in the city of Chicago, 
under the auspices of Ravenswood Lodge No. 777, Brother Hempstead 
was crowned Poet Laureate of Freemasonry. 

This is a distinction and an honor worthily bestowed upon our brother, 
in which all Arkansas Masons find a peculiar pleasure. It is all the more 
sweet, since it comes not from personal seeking, nor from suggestion 
from our brother's fraternal family, but as a recognition of merit. It is 
the third time in the history of Masonry that so distinguished an honor 
has been conferred. The ceremony was elaborate and befitting such an 











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Compliments of Ravenswood Lodge No. 777. 



THE MASON'S ADIEU 

By Robert Burns, First Poet Laureate. 

Adieu, a heart-warm, fond adieu, 

Dear brethren of the mystic tie, 
Ye favored and enlightened few, 

Companions of my social joy; 
Tho' I to foreign lands must hie, 

Pursuing fortune's slippery ba', 
With melting heart and brimful eye, 

I'll mind you still, tho' far awa'. 

THE LEVEL AND THE SQUARE 

By Rob Morris, Second Poet Laureate. 

Hands around, ye faithful Masons, the bright fraternal chain 
We part upon the square below to meet in Heaven again. 
O what words of precious meaning those words Masonic are— 
We meet upon the level, and we part upon the square ! 

LET THERE BE LIGHT 

By Fay Hempstead, Third Poet Laureate. 

In far-off regions of primeval night 
The voice of God decreed : "Let there be light !" 
And there was light. The sun's resplendent face 
Burst into life, and darkness fled apace. 
The gentle day stole o'er the firmament, 
And east and west it's rosy presence went. 
Then moon and star stood forth in milder guise, 
To deck the chambers of the azure skies. 
And all was light, and in perfection stood, 
And God, beholding, saw that it was good. 

So once again, in those grave days of need, 

The voice of God compassionate decreed : 

"Let there be light !" and once more was there light. 

For lo, as if a sunbeam, through the night, 

Should upward shoot its long and streaming mark 

And cleave a passage through the somber dark, 

There rose a light, whose all-sufficient reign 

Has swept the world into its wide domain — 

'Twas Masonry divine! 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 35 

occasion and in it the productions of our brother had an important place. 
I regretted exceedingly that business matters prevented my attendance, 
and on the day of the coronation I sent the following message : 

R.\ W.\ Bro. Roswell T. Spencer, Chairman, 

265 LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 
Arkansas Masons send fraternal greeting and beg to express 
their gratitude for your initiative in recognizing the zeal and 
talent of our beloved Bro. Hempstead. Bear to him our con- 
gratulations and may today be passed for the brightest and 
happiest in your Masonic retrospect. 

M. W. Greeson, 
Grand Master of Arkansas. 

To Brother Spencer and to Ravenswood Lodge we feel deeply 
grateful for the part which they took, and I recommend the appoint- 
ment of a special committee to properly express to them our feelings, 
and to arrange for publication in the proceedings of this grand lodge 
such of the coronation ceremony as seems proper. • 

In accordance with his recommendation a committee consisting of 
Past Grand Master Jacob Trieber, Grand Treasurer C. E. Rosenbaum 
and Past Grand Orator C. C. Hamby was appointed. ' Their report was 
as follows : 

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons 
of Arkansas has learned with pleasure of the selection and coronation of 
our esteemed brother, Fay Hempstead, for over a quarter of a century 
the R.W. grand secretary of that grand lodge, as poet laureate of 
Freemasonry of the United States. They feel that while the honor is 
one well deserved by Brother Hempstead, whose gifted and poetic life has 
for forty years been devoted to Masonry, this grand lodge feels that it 
is but nroper to show its appreciation of the great honor conferred on 
one of its members. More especially does it feel that thanks are due to 
Brother Roswell T. Spencer, who initiated the proceedings, and Ravens- 
woorl Lodge No. 777, under the jurisdiction of the M.W. Grand Lodge 
of Illinois, fqr the interest they took in the matter. Therefore be it 

Resolved, That the thanks of this grand lodge be tendered to the 
Masons of the United States, and to Bro. Roswell T. Spencer and 
Ravenswood Lodge No. 777 for the honor conferred on our brother, Fay 
Hempstead, and the assurance to all Masonic brethren throughout the 
United States of our great appreciation thereof. Be it further 

Resoh^ed, That these resolutions be snrcad upon the records of this 
grand lodge, and that copies thereof, under seal of the grand lodge, be 
sent to Bro. Roswell T. Spencer and Ravenswood Lodge No. 777. 

A history of the laureation was ordered published as an appendix to 
the proceedings, and in his official report as grand secretary R.W. 
Brother Hempstead gave a description of his election and coronation as 
poet laureate from his personal standpoint, together with an account of 
his visit to the Grand Lodge of Illinois at its session of 1008. The latter 
was as follows : 



36 APPENDIX PART I. 



The Grand Lodge of Illinois, A. F. & A. Masons, convening in Chicago 
on the day following the coronation ceremonies, it gave me pleasure to 
visit them, not having any relation to the laureacy, but as grand secre- 
tary of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, as a member of this grand lodge, 
and a servant of it. I was presented as such by Brother Roswell T. 
Spencer, our grand representative, and was received by the officers and 
brethren of that grand lodge, with all possible honor and fraternal 
courtesy. The craft was called up, the attendance being about one 
thousand delegates, and I was received with the grand honors as prac- 
ticed in that grand jurisdiction, and responded with a brief address. I 
received many fraternal courtesies and kindly greetings from the grand 
master, Brother Alexander H. Bell, their grand secretary, Brother 
Isaac Cutter, their grand treasurer, Past Grand Master Leroy A. God- 
dard ; Past Grand Masters John Corson Smith, Edward Cook, George 
M. Moulton, Joseph Robbins, the dean of correspondents of the United 
States, Abram D. Gash, past grand master of Utah, living in Chicago, 
and many others, besides the unfailing courtesies and attentions shown 
me by Brother Spencer at all times. This grand lodge should rejoice 
in having so good a grand representative as Brother Spencer is. He 
not only appreciates the position but does good service in it ; keeping 
this grand lodge at all times informed as to what takes place in that 
jurisdiction, for our information and guidance. The thankful appreciation 
of this grand lodge is due to Brother Spencer for his untiring efforts 
in that capacity. 

The grand master recommended that a change in the law in reference 
to balloting on candidates for the degrees be changed from one ballot for 
each degree separately, to one ballot for all of the three degrees. A 
resolution to that effect was presented, and was laid over one year for 
action. The following resolution was presented and referred to the 
committee on Masonic law and usage for a report at the next session : 

Whereas, Freemasonry has essential secrets of ritual which it forever 
conceals and never reveals to any person in the world ; these ancient 
mysteries are communicated only by the instructive tongue to the at- 
tentive ear and are safely lodged in the faithful breast ; and any other 
mode of communication in Ancient Craft Masonry is most positively for- 
bidden in solemn form and manner ; so likewise is forbidden the writing, 
printing or marking in any manner, of these secrets or any sign or letter 
thereof, whereby the same becomes legible or intelligible to any person, 
lest these secrets might become known to the profane ; and 

Whereas, No individual Mason is exempt from the obligation of pro- 
found secrecy, and no human power can authorize him to write, print or 
mark Masonic secrets in any manner whatsoever; these secrets are 
ancient landmarks of Freemasonry and no body of men, inside or out- 
side of lodge or grand lodge has power to make innovations in Ancient 
Craft Masonry. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, The purchase, sale or use of cipher rituals of the three 
symbolic degrees of Masonry is forbidden ; and any Mason who shall 
hereafter purchase, sell or use anything purporting to be a cipher ritual 
or written, printed or otherwise delineated ritual or exposition of 
Masonry shall be expelled from Masonry. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 37 

The trustees of the Orphans' Home rendered their report, containing 
a financial statement to the effect that upwards of $50,000 has been ex- 
pended upon the buildings and that they will soon be ready for occupancy. 

On the recommendation of the committee on foreign correspondence 
the Grand Orient of Greece was recognized, and several other applica- 
tions for recognition were laid over until next year. It was ordered 
that beginning with the session of 1909 the report of the committee on 
foreign correspondence be published in the proceedings. 

During the year seven lodges were chartered, showing that the fra- 
ternity has a healthy growth throughout the state. There are now 530 
lodges, with a membership of 18,187. the net gain being 505. The receipts 
of the year of the grand lodge were $21,237; the disbursements, $18,756; 
balance on hand, $2,481. 

Edgar A. McCulloch. of Little Rock, was elected grand master ; Fay 
Hempstead, of Little Rock, re-elected grand secretarv. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1908. 

37th Annual, Victoria. June IS. 

This volume is embellished with full-page portraits of M.W. Brothers 
Thomas Trounce (1885), William Dalby (1886), and Francis Bowser 
(1907). 

All the grand officers, nine past grand masters, thirty-three repre- 
sentatives of other grand lodges (Bro. William W. Xorthcott appear- 
ing for Illinois), and the representatives of forty-one lodges were in 
attendance. 

Grand Master Francis Bowser delivered his address, in which, under 
the head of "Necrology/' he noted the death of Past Grand Secretary 
Dill, of Illinois. L nder ''Foreign Relations," he said : 

Several communications have been received from individual Masons. 
requesting information as to whether they would be allowed to visit the 
lodges in this jurisdiction, and in each case the request was referred to 
the recognized grand lodge of the jurisdiction from whence the com- 
munication emanated, and the reply was always to the same effect, that 
they were either suspended Masons, or members of a clandestine lodge, 
which should impress upon us the importance of being guarded against 
clandestine Masonry. 

He reported having granted a number of special dispensations, fifteen 
of which were "to attend divine service in regalia," and three "to wear 



38 APPENDIX PART I. 



regalia at a ball." As matters of taste are said not to be subjects of 
dispute, we shall make no comments. He stated that he had refused all 
requests for dispensations to confer degrees in less time than is required 
by the constitution, which meets with our hearty approval. He granted 
four dispensations for new lodges and continued one from last year. He 
rendered the following decisions : 

Section 157. — No lodge room once dedicated to Masonry shall, while 
occupied by Masons, be used for other than Masonic purposes. Please 
inform us if it is a violation of this section for the chapter of the 
Eastern Star, who have been using our lodge room in the past, to con- 
tinue so doing. 

Answer. — The answer hinges on the last two words of this section, 
"Masonic purposes." One of the benevolent purposes of the Masonic 
institution is to enlarge the sphere of social happiness, and its great 
object is to promote the happiness of the human race, and as the mem- 
bers of that society are all connected with the craft, either by blood or 
marriage, you may allow them the use of your lodge room until other 
arrangements are made. 

An application was received by this lodge, and, before the committee 
could investigate and report, the applicant had left the jurisdiction and 
is now residing in Jersey City, U.S.A., and wishes to have the degrees, 
conferred there. Will it be permissible for Ionic Lodge to ask a lodge 
in that city to confer the degree, retaining him as a member here? 

Answer. — No. Your committee have not reported, which they cannot 
intelligently do without a personal interview, therefore, you cannot ballot: 
on the application. 

No. 2. — Have we permission to return the applicant's fees? 
Answer. — Yes. 

Is the fact of a brother being convicted in the courts for having kept 
a disorderly and gaming house sufficient ground for recommending him 
for expulsion for unmasonic conduct? 

Answer. — A brother convicted for having violated the laws of the 
country may be considered as having committed a Masonic offence, but 
he cannot be punished Masonically until after due trial and proper no- 
tice. 

Can an application be received from a person who has lost his right 
leg between the knee and the ankle, but wears a cork leg and can use- 
it perfectly? 

Answer. — No. 

Can we receive and ballot upon the application for initiation of a 
C. P. R. trainman, running between Kamloops and Vancouver, said ap- 
plicant having a room in each place. Owing to train arrangements the 
applicant spends a little more time in Vancouver than Kamloops? 

Answer. — You can, providing the Vancouver lodges grant a waiver 
of jurisdiction. 

The above are in accord with the Illinois law, except the last. Our 
rule is that the Masonic residence of an applicant means a permanent: 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 



settled domicile, or fixed abode, from choice, and is usually identical 
with his legal residence; and a man who has no fixed abode or legal 
residence cannot petition a lodge for the degrees. His view of the fol- 
lowing matter is very sensible : 

I caused a circular letter to be issued to all the lodges, requesting 
that more explicit information be given the members as to the applicants 
for different degrees. It would appear in many cases from the form of 
notices that the main object is lost sight of, viz.: Conveying as much in- 
formation as possible to the members of the lodge to which they are 
justly entitled, and not by elaborate headings enumerating grand lodge 
officers and past masters, which may appeal to their vanity, but does not 
contain the desired information. 

The address of the deputy grand master and the reports of the dis- 
trict deputy grand masters were read and occupy considerable space in 
the proceedings. 

Grand Secretary Brett reports forty-eight lodges on the roll, with a 
membership of 3,757, the net increase being 401. The funds and prop- 
erty of the lodges amount to $120,000. The committee on foreign cor- 
respondence made a special report which said, in part : 

YYe have received from the V.W. grand secretary letters from the 
Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan and the Gran Logia "Cosmos," of Chi- 
huahua, severally requesting recognition by this grand lodge. 

So far as the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan is concerned there need 
be no hesitation. The lodges in the Province of Saskatchewan are all 
regular lodges, and a considerable majority of them, if not all, joined 
in the formation of the new grand lodge. 

We therefore have much pleasure in recommending this grand lodge 
to recognize the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan as a regular grand lodge. 

As regards the Gran Logia "Cosmos."' the information we have is 
meagre. Their letter simply states that the grand lodge is composed of 
fourteen lodges ; that they have been working fifteen years, and that they 
have been working regularly ten years. A request for further informa- 
tion as to the origin of the lodges which formed the grand lodge, etc., 
brought to hand a pamphlet which, it was intimated, would give all the 
necessary information. Unfortunately this pamphlet, which is dated a 
month earlier than the letter, is equally barren of information^ It does 
disclose the fact, however, that the Grand Lodge "Cosmos" is in frater- 
nal relations with the Grand Lodge of France and with various supreme 
councils of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. 

We recommend that in this instance recognition be not granted. 

The report was adopted, demonstrating the wisdom of the grand 
lodge. 

A letter of regret at his inability to be present was read from M.W. 
Bro. John Corson Smith, of Illinois. 



40 APPENDIX PART I. 



Grand Chaplain Clinton delivered an eloquent address, in the course 
of which he said : 

I look for the time when the Masonic fraternity will take up the 
matter of establishing institutions for the aged, the needy, the care of 
little children, and other similar objects that come within the circle of 
Masonic charity, but I want especially to inculcate more of that spirit 
of charity that should rule our hearts and lives. 

And that spirit of charity extends to our dealings with those that 
are living lives unworthy of our order. It is one of our obligations un- 
der the five points of fellowship to remind a brother of his failings and 
to try to accomplish his reformation ; and this we are to do in the most 
tender manner ; that is, we are to do it in the spirit of charity. There 
are few things in which we can the better show that we have grasped the 
true meaning of charity than the manner in which we deal with those 
who have erred from the straight path. This is the very charity of God 
Himself, who will have all men saved and come to the knowledge of the 
truth, who desires not the death of a sinner, but his amendment. I 
desire to remind you very earnestly of this part of our obligation to set 
forth true charity. And how beautiful the words of the apostle are in 
this connection : "Charity beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth 
all things, endureth all things." We believe that no brother is lost to 
all sense of righteousness, that there is something within that we can 
still appeal to. He may be an erring brother indeed, but a brother still. 
And so in faith in the underlying desire and love of good we exercise 
that charity that seeks his reformation, and it may be we become the 
means of saving a sinner from the error of his ways. We are filled with 
hope, too, for charity hopeth all things, and though there may not be 
much room for hope, yet the true charity knows no despair for anyone 
as long as life lasts. And charity endureth all things, many a failure, 
many a set-back, many a disappointment, in the work of saving the er- 
ring, but through it all true charity never faileth. 

William K. Houston, of Victoria, was elected grand master ; R. E. 
Brett, of Victoria, re-elected grand secretary. 

The report on correspondence (182 pp.) is the twelfth by Bro. W. A. 
DeWolf Smith, and includes a review of seventy-one grand lodges, nine 
being for two years. He devotes four pages to Illinois, and mentions 
among other incidents of the annual session of 1907 the introduction of 
M.W. Bro. A. D. Gash, P.G.M. of Utah, who, much to our personal 
satisfaction, is now a resident of Chicago. He says in regard to the 
correspondence report : 

The report on foreign correspondence is another masterly paper from 
the pen of our learned Bro. Joseph Robbins. His report is prefaced by 
a special report in which he defines those bodies which may and may 
not be recognized as Masonic and regular. The list is far too long to 
give here, but it very properly includes in the latter class all grand lodges 
and grand orients which derive their existence from Scottish Rite au- 
thority, as well as 

"All supreme councils, sovereign sanctuaries, or other powers, how- 
ever named, wherever situated, of whatever rite — excepting regular grand 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 41 



lodges of Free and Accepted Masons — assuming to erect lodges with 
authority to confer the three degrees of Symbolic or Craft Masonry." 

He also mentions with approval Brother Robbixs' report recommend- 
ing refusal of recognition to "a body calling itself the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico," which recommendation was so wisely adopted by our 
grand lodge. He does not agree, however, with our lamented brother's 
views regarding the Grand Lodge of Queensland, and says : 

We regret that in this matter Brother Robbins has allowed his sym- 
pathy to run away with his judgment. If he thinks again he will surely 
agree that the mere fact that all the lodges in a given territory have been 
invited to join in the organization of a new grand lodge does not justify 
a small minority of these lodges in proceeding to organize a grand lodge 
without the concurrence of the majority. That Brother Robbins does 
not really believe that a minority of the lodges in a territory can legally 
form a grand lodge is evident from his reply to the question of Brother 
Matthews, of Kansas, ''What would be a square deal basis for recogni- 
tion?'' 

"We would answer that such a basis would be the majority decision 
to form a grand lodge, reached by a convention to which all the lodges 
in a politically autonomous, Masonically open territory had been bidden. 
such majority to comprise not less than three lodges, the genealogy of 
the lodges to be such that we can fellowship them without violating the 
agreements we entered into when we were installed masters of lodges. 
and which we have exacted from every master-elect as an indispensable 
prerequisite to installation, etc." 

Brother Robbixs' contention was that if all the lodges in the state 
had been invited to be represented in the convention called to consider 
the question of organizing a grand lodge, and had been permitted to 
decide whether they would attend, that a majority of the lodges so rep- 
resented (not less than three in number") had a perfect right to organ- 
ize a grand lodge. The fact that the Grand Lodge of England objects 
so strenuously to recognizing the Grand Lodge of Queensland really cuts 
no figure in the matter, because if our good old mother country had had 
her way about it there would have been no L nited States of America. 
and instead of the galaxy of sovereign and independent grand lodges 
now existing in this country there would be a lot of district grand 
lodges controlled by the Grand Lodge of England. Conservatism is a 
good thing, but it easily can be carried to excess. 

We cannot do better than quote the language used some years since 
by Brother Robbixs, in the discussion of this question : 

There is a Masonic law growing out of the world's usage, analogous 
to the international law which has grown out of the consensus of the 
nations of the world. The Masonic law applicable to such matters may 
or may not be reflected in the enactments of any grand lodge, and it is 
immaterial whether it is or not so far as the rights of those engaged in 
forming a new grand lodge in independent open territory i- concerned, 



42 Appendix — part i. 



for no grand lodge can give to its enactments extrajurisdictional force. 
As no nation can defy the conceded principles of international law and 
make that defiance effective beyond the range of its guns, so no grand 
lodge can defy the principles of Masonic law into which the world's 
Masonic usage has ripened, and make that defiance effective beyond the 
jurisdictional lines, which, defining either territory or subject matter, 
that law concedes to be the rightful possession of such body. 

The law of the Masonry that is over and above all grand lodges long 
since established the principle that, proceeding by certain recognized reg- 
ular methods, the lodges in independent open territory, sufficient in num- 
ber to form a grand lodge, become seized of absolute jurisdiction over 
the whole subject matter relating to the establishment of a grand lodge 
therein. 

This law is the same for all latitudes and longitudes, the same in 
Queensland under the Southern Cross as in Alberta under the glare of 
the aurora borealis, where on the same lines a new grand lodge has just 
been formed. Its applicabilty and force has been illustrated in the form- 
ation of every grand lodge in the United States ; in every province of 
the Dominion of Canada, throughout Australasia and in the British 
Islands themselves, whence now comes the attempt to discredit the Grand 
Lodge of Queensland ; and as it is soon to be illustrated in Alaska and 
Hawaii, and doubtless with the same absence of friction that character- 
ized the formation of the new Grand Lodge of Alberta. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1909. 

38th Annual. Vancouver. June 17. 

This volume is adorned with full-page portraits of Alexander Rol- 
and Milne, grand master in 1887-8; John Stilwell Clute, grand mas- 
ter in 1889 ; William Kyle Houston, grand master in 1908. It con- 
tains the proceedings of three special communications. One was held at 
New Westminster, July 13, 1908, for the purpose of attending the fu- 
neral of Robert Brenton Kelly, past senior grand warden. The second 
was held at Nelson, September 7, 1908, for the laying of a corner-stone, 
and the third was held at Fernie, May 10, 1909, for the dedication of a 
Masonic hall. 

At the annual seven past grand masters were present and also the 
representatives of twenty-seven grand lodges, the envoy for Illinois not 
among the number. 

The grand master, William K. Houston, read his annual address, in 
which, after a well-written exordium, he mentions the distinguished 
brethren of his and other jurisdictions who have recently passed over 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 43 

"the Great Divide.'' Among them were R. B. Kelly, past senior grand 
warden, and C. C. Fisher, district deputy grand master of British Col- 
umbia, and Loyal L. Munn, past grand secretary of Illinois, and grand 
representative of British Columbia. 

During the year he granted seven dispensations for new lodges and 
a large number of special dispensations for various purposes, eight of 
them being to attend divine service in regalia and one "to wear regalia 
at a ball." He refused several requests for dispensations to confer de- 
grees in less time than required by the constitution, and to receive appli- 
cations from petitioners who had not the necessary residential qualifi- 
cations. 

He rendered the following decisions, all of which seem to us to be 
sound : 

Can a lodge receive an application from a person who has lost index 
finger of right hand at the second joint? 
Answer. — No. 

Can a lodge receive an application from a person who has lost the 
index finger of the right hand? 
Answer. — No. 

Can a lodge receive an application from a person who has lost the 
third finger of the left hand at the second joint? 
Answer. — Yes. 

Can a lodge grant a dimit to a brother who has signed an application 
for a dispensation to a new lodge? 
Answer. — Yes. 

Can a lodge receive an application from a person who has only the 
first finger and thumb on right hand ? 
Answer. — No. 

He gave in detail an account of his official visits to his constituent 
lodges, and speaks with pleasure of a visit to the Grand Lodge of Wash- 
ington, December 7 and 8, 1908, at the celebration of the fiftieth anni- 
versary of its organization- 

He stated that the reason the grand lodge was held at Vancouver 
instead of at Cranbrook, as was decided at the session of 1908, was be- 
cause he had learned that it was the wish of a large number of the 
brethren to visit the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific exposition at Seattle, and 
holding the meeting on the Pacific coast would enable them to attend 
both the grand lodge and the fair without inconvenience. Before mak- 
ing the change, however, he consulted all the lodges in the jurisdiction 
to ascertain whether there would be any objection, and as they wore 
practically unanimous (including the lodge at Cranbrook) in favor of 



44 APPENDIX PART I. 



Vancouver, he instructed the grand secretary to convene the meeting 
at the latter place. 

The grand treasurer, Harry H. Watson, reported a balance of $20,- 
633 in the charity fund. Among the sums expended during the year 
was $500 contributed to the Anti-Tuberculosis Society and a similar 
amount sent to the brethren at Fernie, at the time of a disastrous fire. 
In regard to the latter sum the committee on finance said : 

Referring to the grant of $500 to Elk River Lodge No. 35, Fernie, 
we understand that this money was advanced for the relief of distressed 
brethren of that lodge, but on reading the report of the district deputy 
G.M. of District No. 8 we find that the amount was used "in purchasing 
new lodge furniture and regalia," and taking into consideration that this 
lodge's returns show a cash balance in hand of $755.45, and "disburse- 
ments of relief" are nil, we are of the opinion that Elk River Lodge 
No. 35 should be called upon to return this amount to this M.W. grand 
lodge. And speaking generally of the charity fund, we would strongly 
recommend that no disposition of the fund be made except strictly in 
accordance with the constitution. 

The grand secretary, R. E. Brett, reported forty-seven chartered 
lodges, eight under dispensation, a net increase in membership of 402, 
and a total membership of 4,158. 

An address was delivered by the grand chaplain, Rev. H. G. Fiennes- 
Clinton, on the subject of "Prayer." He said, in part: 

Every Mason at his entrance into the lodge room was caused to 
kneel and attend prayer. In the ceremonies of raising he is exhorted to 
pray for himself. There is also the prayer offered by the chaplain at 
the beginning and end of every meeting of lodges, and that prayer that 
is offered at the raising of every candidate to the sublime degree. Thus 
are Masons from the beginning to the end men of prayer. It has often 
occurred to me to raise the question as to how far these prayers are 
really looked upon by Masons as the outpouring of the heart and mind 
to God, or how far they are regarded as mere forms, or part of a drama. 
I want to impress upon my brother Masons that they should make these 
and all prayers more real. 

The manner in which lodge prayers are sometimes delivered reminds 
us of the remark old Mr. Brock (a Southern Illinois character) made 
to the minister. The latter was expostulating with the old man regard- 
ing his habit of using profane language, and said : 

"Why don't you act like your brother John? He prays instead of 
swearing." 

"Yes," was the reply, "I swear a good deal, and John prays a good 
deal, but neither one of us means anything by it." 

The grand librarian, W. A. DeWolf Smith, reported that 120 bound 
volumes had been added to the library. Among those mentioned were 
"Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Illinois for 1908," "Poems," by 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 45 

Fay Hempstead, "The Masonic Voice-Review for 1908," and "History of 
the Laureation of R. W. Bro. Hempstead." 

The attention of the grand lodge was drawn to the continued illness 
of one of its valued members, M.W. Bro. General John Corson Smith, 
of Chicago, Illinois, and the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the grand secretary be instructed to send a telegram 
to the M.W. brother, conveying sympathy, and expressing the hope that 
news of his recovery might soon be received. 

Harry N. Rich, of Ladner's, was elected grand master; R. E. Brett, 
of Victoria, was re-elected grand secretary; and it was decided to hold 
the next session at Cranbrook, June 23, 1910. 

The report on correspondence (193 pp.) is again by W. A. DeWolf 
Smith. Six pages are devoted to an excellent review of Illinois for 
1908. In regard to the conundrums propounded to the grand master 
he said : 

The grand master was asked the usual large number of questions, and 
the usual proportion of them were questions which ought not to have 
been asked. Many of them displayed a lack of acquaintance with the 
constitution and many showed a want of common sense. Among them 
were such questions as to whether a lodge could vote its funds to re- 
pair or build a church ; to promote a railway, or to bonus a shoe fac- 
tory. 

In reference to one of our distinguished visitors he said : 

R.W. Bro. Fay Hempstead, grand secretary of Arkansas, who on 
the previous evening had been crowned as Masonic poet-laureate, was 
given a hearty welcome, to which he responded in a few felicitous re- 
marks. 

He correctly terms Bro. Elmer E. Beach's address "an eloquent ora- 
tion," and quotes a number of sentences from it. He evidently believes 
Brother Beach too optimistic, judging from his comment on the state- 
ment that, "to make world-peace an accomplished fact there is needed 
only a general compulsory arbitration treaty" : 

Quite so. The mice once agreed that all that was necessary to make 
them secure was a bell on the neck of the cat. The trouble was to ger 
it there. 

He refers to a case of discipline mentioned in the report of the com- 
mittee on appeals and grievances, and says that it "can hardly refer to 
the case alluded to in Grand Master Bell's address, as a lodge, would 
not, we imagine, be allowed to try its master." It was the case mentioned 
by M.W. Brother Bell, but the lodge did not try its master, because 
that officer having been deposed by the grand master was no longer in 
official position and was subject to trial by his lodge the same as any 
other member. 



46 APPENDIX PART I. 



He speaks of Brother Robbins' report on foreign correspondence as 
"a book in itself," and quotes approvingly from it in regard to a num- 
ber of matters. He does not agree with him, however, in regard to the 
Grand Lodge of Queensland. Brother Robbins having said that he felt 
sure "the bulldozing acts of the English intermediary authority" found 
no warrant in the regulations of the Grand Lodge of England, Brother 
Smith quotes the following rule from the English "Book of Consti- 
tutions" : 

21 8 A. In a colony or foreign part in which a district grand lodge 
exists, if the district grand master shall think proper to grant a dispen- 
sation for that purpose, it shall be lawful for any lodge to hold a special 
meeting, or meetings, to discuss and resolve on the question of the form- 
ation of a sovereign grand lodge for or including the district or part 
thereof, or any neighboring district or part thereof, or any lodges not 
in a district. Such dispensation may be granted subject to any condi- 
tions that the district grand master may deem proper, and also to pro- 
visions enabling two or more lodges to unite in the special meeting; 
and, if the district grand master should refuse to grant a dispensation, 
an appeal may be made to the grand master. In a colony or foreign 
part in which more than one district grand lodge exists the same pro- 
cedure shall be adopted in each district, and before any grand lodge shall 
be recognized as having any jurisdiction over the whole of such colony 
or foreign part the consent of each district grand lodge shall be certified 
by the district grand master thereof. 

Brother Robbins evidently gave more credit to the Grand Lodge of 
England for fair dealing than it deserves, as the above rule places the 
power of preventing the holding of lawful meetings to consider the 
formation of a sovereign grand lodge in the hands of the district grand 
master and the grand master. If these officers wish to commit "bull- 
dozing acts," as has been done in the case of the Grand Lodge of 
Queensland, what recourse have the brethren who are aggrieved? Abso- 
lutely none, except to rebel and form a grand lodge regardless of the 
desires of the Grand Lodge of England or its officers. 

At the close of his report he says : 

N.B. — As this is sent to press we regret to learn that our distin- 
guished brother is seriously ill. We hope soon to hear of his complete 
recovery. 

We all hoped, as did our brother, for Brother Robbins' recovery, but 
alas ! our hopes were turned to ashes. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 



CALIFORNIA, 1908. 

59th Annual. San Francisco. October 13. 

The bluff and hearty visage of Grand Master George Mairs Perine 
illustrates the opening page of this report. There were present the rep- 
resentatives of two hundred and eighty-three out of 315 chartered lodges 
and delegates from eleven lodges under dispensation. Seven past grand 
masters graced the platform and the presence of a past deputy grand 
master, a past junior grand warden and a past grand lecturer was 
also noted. As California does not indulge in the representative system 
there is no reference to diplomats. In the first of the twenty solid pages 
of the grand master's address he says : 

In holding the honored office of grand master, I have been impressed 
with the Masonic growth. Its obligations have been everywhere exacted. 
and obedience to the moral law has been rigidly enforced. Much as we 
have accomplished, much yet is to be done. Let all our aims be our 
God, our country and truth. God's love is compatible with universal 
wisdom ; our country's right is more beautiful than affection, and truth 
will brighten the sunshine. There is joy to all men living a Masonic life. 
The world is upheld by the veracity of good men ; they make the earth 
wholesome. Right ethics are central, and go from the soul outward. 
Life's victory is to gain control of the selfish nature, that it may be sub- 
ordinate to a sense of duty, to cultivate and develop the moral faculties 
so that they may assert their superiority and thereby establish in the in- 
dividual true manhood, morality being an emanation from God. 

Every institution, society or order is beneficial in its ultmate results 
just in proportion as it enlists, encourages and assists the individual to 
fight this battle and gain this victory. Spasmodic fevers of charity will 
never gain the battle of life. Character is to be found in the permanent 
disposition of the mind, in the governing purpose of the life. This pur- 
pose is the result of a deliberate, unreserved commitment of the spirit 
to the ends of worthiness. To overcome this selfish power, it is absolutely 
necessary for the individual to commit himself fully, firmly, deliberately 
unreservedly to the ends of benevolence. What the man needs, what the 
interests of < his moral nature demand in this conflict with these selfish 
tendencies, is some individual, some influence, some institution which will 
lead or induce him to rise up to worthiness. The smallest acquisition of 
such in any quarter is so much good to the commonwealth of men. 

He refers in feeling and eloquent words to the passing of Bro. 
Chauncey Carrol Bush, for many years the Bible bearer of the grand 
lodge, and of Bro. Jacob Voorsanger, a past grand orator. He re- 
ported that the Grand Lodge was opened in special communication to lay 
fifteen corner-stones, to constitute seven lodges and to dedicate three 
Masonic halls. 

Thirteen dispensations to form new lodges were granted. To us oi 
Illinois it is interesting to learn that in one of these cases the dispensation 



48 APPENDIX PART I. 



was issued in spite of the fact that the nearest lodge refused consent, 
"the constitution providing that whenever the nearest or most convenient 
chartered lodge refuses to grant a recommendation the grand master 
may, if after full investigation he deems it to be for the best interests 
of Masonry, grant such dispensation without any such recommendation 
having been given." If the matter is thus disposed of, why not leave it 
entirely with the grand master in the first place? Several of the grand 
masters decisions grew out of relations with lodges in the Sandwich and 
Philippine Islands, where the Grand Lodge of California has constituted 
lodges. In the former some complications grew out of questions arising 
with the Grand Lodge of Scotland, which also has constituents in Hawaii, 
but as neither grand lodge claimed exclusive jurisdiction of the territory 
the matter was amicably adjusted. 

In the Philippines the problem arose as to the recognition of Spanish 
formed lodges and a long report was submitted but no definite conclusion 
reached regarding the conflicting claims of various bodies whose parent- 
age was in Spain, but none of which could show a satisfactory title to 
legitimacy. The sentiment seemed to favor the formation of a grand 
lodge in the Philippines made up of lodges chartered by the Grand Lodge 
of California, and to leave the settlement of the whole question to said 
body. 

Interesting conditions developed in several cases where the master of 
a lodge had directed the junior warden to prefer charges, where the 
master was an interested party in the prosecution or where he was a 
necessary witness at the trial, because in either case the California law 
appears not only to prevent the master from presiding at the trial, but 
throws the trial into another lodge. We can see no sufficient reason why 
the senior warden or junior warden might not preside in such cases, 
or in the event of their prejudice or inability, why the grand master 
might not appoint a special deputy to preside. Why burden another 
lodge with the troubles or soiled linen of a quarrelsome lodge? 

The grand master reported the resignation of Grand Secretary George 
Johnson on account of failing health and the appointment of Brother 
John Whicher for the unexpired term: We cannot give space to many 
other important matters referred to in the grand master's address, but 
will quote the following sentiments from the closing portion : 

Our Masonic dream should be, stone by stone we rear a sacred 
fane, a temple, neither pagoda, mosque nor church; but loftier, simpler, 
always open-doored to every breath from heaven and truth and peace 
and love, and where justice will come and dwell therein. 

In that way we sustain the honor, the glory and the reputation it 
has held for ages. Then the practical object of our institution would 
be accomplished, its members living lives of usefulness and virtue. What 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 49 

more beautiful teaching does one require than what is set before our 
brother on his initiatory journey? He learns that the Masonic order 
was formed for the practice of brotherly love, relief and truth ; its 
foundation faith, hope and charity, its supporting pillars temperance, forti- 
tude, prudence and justice. 

The directors of the Masonic Temple Association reported the pur- 
chase of site for their new building on the N. W. corner of Van Ness 
Ave. and Oak St., 120x109 feet, for the sum of $235,000. Of this amount 
$195,000 was furnished by the grand lodge, $25,000 by the grand chapter 
and $15,000 by the grand commandery. 

Upon motion of Bro. James H. MacLafferty, referred tu the finance 
committee and by them approved, the grand lodge voted to affiliate 
with the Masonic Relief Association of the United States and Canada. 

Bro. Motley H. Flint introduced a copy of an act of the legislature 
of New York in relation to the fraudulent use of the name of secret 
fraternities and urged that grand lodge ask the legislature of California 
to pass a similar act. This was referred to the jurisprudence committee, 
who subsequently reported recommending that it be referred to the in- 
coming grand master for such action as he deems proper and it was so 
referred. 

We confess to being so old-fashioned that our prejudices or sensibilities 
are a little jarred when it comes to acknowledging that we cannot take 
care of ourselves in matters purely Masonic without legislative aid. 

The grand lodge wisely rescinded its former action by which the re- 
port of the committee on correspondence was limited to fifty pages. 

The finance committee reported that the total assets of the grand 
lodge were $249,244.96 of which $232,535.86 was cash in banks and the 
balance was bonds, stock and property. 

The reports of the various boards of relief form a very interesting 
part of the California proceedings. We extract the . following summaries 
showing that our brethren of the coast "do unto others" with, a l.'bera' 
hand : 

Receipts of the San Francisco board of relief $20,407.74, expenditures 
$13,062.08. 

The Oakland board reported the receipt of $6,322.71 and disbursements 
$3,778.05. 

The Los Angeles board received $13,015.04 and paid Out $12,501.54. 

The Philippine board at Manila reports receipts of $1,266.74 including 
$250.00 borrowed from Manila Lodge No. 342, all of which had been dis- 
tributed. 



50 APPENDIX PART I. 



The Sacramento board received $3,220.59 and disbursed $1,706.31 and 
the Stockton board had receipts amounting to $556.60. 

In the summary of the receipts and expenditures of the San Francisco 
board it is disclosed that relief to the amount of $742.95 was extended 
to Masons from Illinois, and that only $417.45 of this was refunded. 

The following from the report of the committee on finance was 
adopted : 

We have received and carefully considered the reports of the boards 
of relief of San Francisco, Los Angeles, Oakland, Stockton, Sacramento, 
and the Philippines, and offer the following resolution and recommend 
its adoption : 

Resolved, That the sum of $7,700.00 be and the same is hereby appro- 
priated from the funds of this grand lodge, to be divided as follows, viz. : 
$2,000 to the Board of Relief of San Francisco. 
4,000 to the Board of Relief of Los Angeles. 
1,000 to the Board of Relief of Oakland. 
200 to the Board of Relief of Stockton. 

From the representatives of the various boards of relief we have 
ascertained that there is no uniformity in the per cap'ta amount con- 
tributed to said boards from the lodges in the respective jurisdictions, 
the same varying all the way from five to eight cents per month. We, 
therefore, offer the following resolution and recommend its adoption : 

Resolved, That from and after the date of this grand lodge com- 
munication no funds of this grand lodge shall be appropriated for 
boards of relief unless they first show satisfactory evidence that they 
have received the sum of eight cents a month per capita from the lodges 
constituting their respective compacts. 

The committee on jurisprudence, M.W. Bro. Frank M. Angelotti, 
chairman, having had under consideration the communication from the 
Grand Lodge of Tennessee regarding printed rituals, as fully quoted in 
our review of Arizona, reported as follows and the report was adopted, 
viz. : "We are in entire accord with the belief of the Grand Lodge of 
Tennessee as expressed in the foregoing address and recommend its ap- 
proval by the grand lodge." 

On recommendation of the committee on jurisprudence the following" 
amendment to the constitution, relative to the trial of charges against a 
brother in a lodge under dispensation was adopted : 

Such charges shall never be presented to the master of a lodge under 
dispensation, if there is a chartered lodge having concurrent juris- 
diction over the same territory, except where the accused is a member of 
such lodge under dispensation ; but where the accused is a member of 
such a lodge, or resides within its jurisdiction, and no chartered lodge 
has concurrent jurisdiction over the same territory, they may be so pre- 
sented. When the lodge to the master of which such charges are pre- 
sented is a lodge under dispensation, such master shall at once transmit 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 51 

the same to the grand master, who shall thereupon, if it shall appear 
to him that the act or acts complained of therein constitute a Masonic 
offense, designate some chartered lodge to try the same, and transmit 
such charges to the master thereof, who shall thereupon proceed there- 
with in the same manner as if the charges had originally been presented 
to him. 

The report of the committee on correspondence, Alonzo J. Monroe, 
chairman, contains 115 pages, four of which are given to Illinois for our 
session of 1907 and 1908, the two years of M.W. Bro. Allen's adminis- 
tration. He quotes the grand master's decisions regarding the use of 
the stereopticon and "loose leaf" book for records, and makes nearly a 
full page extract from Bro. Scott's oration, which he says, "one cannot 
read without being humbled yet lifted up in aspiration and the desire to 
live more worthily as a man." 

Oscar Lawlor, grand master, Los Angeles ; John Whicher, grand 
secretary, 901 Call Bldg, San Francisco. 



CANADA, IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 1908. 

53rd Annual. Niagara Falls. July 15. 

This volume is embellished with a fine half-tone portrait of Grand 
Master Augustus T. Freed, and contains the proceedings of six special 
communications held during the year. 

Eight past grand masters, upwards of a hundred other past grand 
officers, and thirty grand representatives of other grand lodges were 
present. R.W. Bro. A. Shaw appeared for Illinois. The members of the 
diplomatic corps were received and welcomed by the grand master, and 
were accorded the grand honors. 

Before the opening of the grand lodge Hon. R. F. Carter, mayor of 
the city of Niagara Falls, was introduced by the grand director of cere- 
monies and delivered an address of welcome, to which the grand master 
responded : 

Mr. Mayor : — On behalf of the grand lodge, I fehank you most heartily 
for your kind and hospitable greeting. It is gratifying to us to be wel- 
comed by one who is not only the chief executive officer of the city of 
Niagara Falls, but who is also a brother and a ruler in our craft. Grand 
lodge is very fortunate in being able to meet in so beautiful a place as 
Niagara Falls, made wonderful by one of the marvels of nature, and 
made beautiful by the hand of man. We are also grateful to the Great 
Architect of the Universe because we have been favored by such fine 



52 APPENDIX PART I. 



weather. Nor do we forget, Mr. Mayor, that we are meeting on historic 
ground. On this very spot the soldiers of our king and the citizen 
soldiers of Canada fought a most desperate and bloody battle to preserve 
the liberties of our country. We should never forget the debt of grati- 
tude we owe to our forefathers for the sacrifices they made to preserve 
for us the blessings we now enjoy. Neither do we forget that at Niagara 
Falls that convention met which resolved to form the Grand Lodge of 
Canada. The preliminary steps were here taken which were carried to 
completion a few months later at Hamilton. On all accounts, therefore, 
we should rejoice that the grand lodge has the privilege of meeting this 
year in your beautiful city. For the excellent arrangements made by 
the local brethren, and citizens for our accommodation and entertainment, 
I beg to tender to you, Mr. Mayor, the warmest appreciation of the 
members of grand lodge. 

Grand Master Freed delivered his address, and reported a number of 
rulings, or decisions. Among them were the following, which for con- 
venience we have numbered : 

1. Can a lodge, after suspending a member for non-payment of dues, 
lay a charge against him for a more serious offence; and, if found 
guilty on the vote of the lodge, expel him? 

Answer. — The lodge may, after suspending him for non-payment of 
dues, try him on another charge. The lodge cannot expel him ; but, if 
he be found guilty, it may suspend him indefinitely, report the facts to 
the grand lodge, and recommend his expulsion. 

2. Is a lodge after suspending a member for non-payment of dues, 
bound to reinstate him in the event of him tendering his arrears and all 
other amounts owing the lodge, irrespective of his conduct in the mean- 
time? Has the lodge no voice in the matter whatever? 

Answer. — If a member suspended for non-payment of dues tenders 
the amount of arrears and all other amounts owing to the lodge, he must 
be restored. But charges may be preferred against him for any other 
offence of which he may have been guilty, either before his suspension 
or during his suspension, when he may be tried just as if he had never 
been suspended. 

3. When an adverse report is made against a candidate, must the re- 
port be received by the lodge before the applicant is declared a rejected 
candidate? Yes. 

4. A past master from another jurisdiction affiliated with a lodge in 
this jurisdiction, and was elected master, he not having served as war- 
den in this jurisdiction. Is the election legal? No: the election is void, 
and the brother must not be installed. 

5. Has a lodge the power to pass a motion disqualifying from hold- 
ing office those who solicit votes or resort to electioneering methods? 
No : no Mason can be deprived of any of his Masonic rights or privil- 
eges except after charges have been regularly made and the brother has 
been duly convicted of a Masonic offense. 

6. Is it proper to give a Masonic funeral to a deceased brother who 
at the time of his death was under suspension? No: suspended mem- 
bers are deprived of all their Masonic rights and privileges. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 53 

7. The secretary of a lodge sent out a notice of meeting in regular 
form and proper time, without the names of candidates to be balloted 
for. Three days before the meeting of the lodge he sent out a separate 
notice containing the candidates' names. Ruled that the ballot was void. 
A new ballot must be taken after regular and proper notice. 

8. When a ballot was ordered to be taken (about 30 members being 
present) there were in the box fifty white balls and three black balls. 
Objection was taken. Ruled that there must be at least one white ball 
and one black ball for each member entitled to vote. 

In regard to No. 1, in Illinois a lodge has the same power to expel 
as to suspend a member, subject, of course, to an appeal to the grand 
lodge. A suspended member is liable to expulsion, if he does anything 
deserving the extreme penalty. Referring to No. 2, with us a lodge 
cannot refuse to act upon an application for reinstatement for suspen- 
sion for non-payment of dues, but in case a lodge declines to reinstate to 
good standing the amount of the delinquent dues paid by the petitioner 
must promptly be returned to him. No. 3 would indicate that in case an 
adverse report is made by an investigating committee, that he is rejected 
by virtue of the report. With us, a ballot is always taken on a candi- 
date after the reception of the report, which is merely for the informa- 
tion of the brethren in order that they may vote intelligently upon the 
petition. In regard to No. 4, it seems to us that if a brother has served 
as warden or master of a lodge within the jurisdiction of a recognized 
grand lodge, that he should be eligible to election as master of the lodge 
with which he has affiliated. We agree with No. 5 that a constituent 
lodge cannot disfranchise its members for the offense of electioneering 
for office, but there is nothing to prevent a grand lodge passing a law 
"disqualifying from holding office those who solicit votes or resort to 
electioneering methods." Illinois has the following law, which, if it 
were strictly enforced, would do away with political methods in our 
grand lodge : 

Electioneering in any way for one's self for office in the grand lodge 
is prohibited as unmasonic, and any member found guilty of the offense 
shall be ineligible to office; and, if already in office, shall forfeit the 
office held by him. 

No. 6 is, or should be, good law in any grand jurisdiction. In ref- 
erence to No. 7, we are of the opinion that it is not safe to give the 
names of candidates in written or printed notices of meetings, because 
outsiders would be so likely to see them. In regard to No. 8 the grand 
master said : 

Several cases have been reported to me of irregularities in balloting 
for candidates. It appears that in some lodges, while sufficient white 
balls are provided for all members present, there are but two or three 
black balls. This makes it easy for an interested and unscrupulous dea- 
con to abstract one or more of the black balls and thus to insure a fa- 



54 APPENDIX PART I. 



vorable result. It may also destroy the secrecy of the ballot. I have 
ruled that there should be at least as many white balls and as many 
black balls in the box as there are members present. I am of opinion 
that this should be made a constitutional provision. It is to be desired 
that brethren exercise more frequently their privilege of examining the 
ballot after it has been placed upon the altar. If that were done fewer 
mistakes would be made in declaring the result of the ballot. 

We agree with the decision as to the number of balls, but we never 
before heard of a jurisdiction in which any but the master and wardens 
were permitted to examine the ballot. It is certainly a poor kind of 
lodge in which the stationed officers cannot be trusted to tell the truth 
in regard to the ballot. In this connection we are reminded of a little 
anecdote. When Past Grand Master John Corson Smith was lieutenant 
governor of Illinois, one of the colored janitors of the state house at 
Springfield came into his office one morning and related the following 
incident, which he said occurred the previous evening in the negro lodge 
of which he was a member : 

The ballot box had been passed and the worshipful master asked, 
"How is the ballot in the south, Brother Junior Warden?" "Oar in 
the south, worshipful." "How is the ballot in the west, Brother Senior 
Warden?" "Oar in the west, worshipful." The W.M. then inspected 
the box and said, "And clar in the east. I therefore declar Mr. Josephus 
Johnson duly elected to take the degrees in this lodge." Up jumped a 
big coon, as black as the ace of spades, and cried, "That's a 'fernal lie, 
worshipful master. I put in four black balls myself." 

In his notices of the fraternal dead he says of their late grand sec- 
retary : 

Most Worshipful Bro. Hugh Murray died from apoplexy on the 28th 
of November, 1907. He was stricken down while in his office, was con- 
veyed to his home, and passed away two days later. After filling many 
offices in all branches of Masonry he was elected to the office of grand 
master in 1884, and served for two years. For four years he had been 
grand secretary. Brother Murray was a man of whom it may be said 
that duty was the guiding star of his life. That which he thought he 
ought to do he did with his might. That which he thought he ought not 
to do he could not be persuaded nor forced to do. His life was a serv- 
ice of activity and love. His record is a record of work well done. His 
reward is the loving memory of all who knew him. May we not be 
confident that it is the benediction of his Father who is in Heaven? 

He stated that after the death of Bro. Hugh Murray he appointed 
Bro. R. L. Gunn to serve as grand secretary until the meeting of the 
grand lodge. 

He reported having granted eight dispensations for new lodges and 
continued two from the previous year. He constituted four lodges, 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 



dedicated twelve lodge rooms and laid six corner-stones. In regard to 
Royal Solomon Mother Lodge No. 293, of Jerusalem, he said: 

Soon after the last communication of this grand lodge the warrant 
issued to the Royal Solomon Mother Lodge No. 293, was returned to 
the grand secretary, and the affairs of that body may now be considered 
a closed chapter in our history. 

The semi-centennial fund for benevolent purposes now amounts to 
$44,154. The intention is to increase it to $100,000. The grants made 
by the board of benevolence for the year amounted to about $29,000, 
and the grants made by lodges aggregated $15,000. 

Upwards of 200 pages were devoted to the reports of the several 
D.D.G.M.'s. 

The Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan was recognized. 

Greetings were exchanged by telegraph with the Grand Lodge of 
Knights of Pythias of Ontario, then in annual session, which is some- 
thing of a novelty in the way of "fraternal greetings.'' 

Augustus T. Freed, of Hamilton, was re-elected grand master; R. L. 
Gunn, of Hamilton, was elected grand secretary. 

The report on correspondence (116 pp.) is by Henry Robertson, 
chairman of the committee. He devotes four pages to Illinois for 1907, 
in which he mentions the death of Grand Secretary Dill. He quotes 
the response of M.W. Bro. John M. Pearson, when introduced as a 
member of the grand lodge for fifty years, and gives Brother Robbins' 
report regarding an alleged Masonic body calling itself the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico, and his special report relating to the recognition of 
certain European grand lodges. 



CANADA, IN THE PROVINCE OE ONTARIO, 1909. 

54th Annual. London. July 13. 

This volume is illustrated with a half-tone portrait of A. T. Freed, 
grand master, 1907-S-9. 

Grand Master Freed delivered his annual address, in course of which 
he mentioned the deaths of R.W. Bro. Thomas Creighton M VCNABB, 
district deputy grand master, August 0, 190S, aged Si, and R.W. Bro. 
Christopher McLellan, past district deputy grand master. March 10. 
1909. 



5& APPENDIX PART I. 



Under the head of "Rulings," he said : 

I have not been called upon during the year for many formal rul- 
ings. But I have received a great many letters asking for decisions, 
when the writers would have found answers by consulting the consti- 
tution. If masters of lodges would carefully read the fundamental law 
of our order they would not need to write so many letters, and they 
would save the grand master and the grand secretary a great deal of 
unnecessary work. 

The formal rulings are as follows : 

1. A lodge meeting was closed in the regular way. Then a belated 
candidate arrived. The master desired to reopen the lodge and initiate 
the candidate; but the district deputy grand master, who was present,, 
ruled that he could not legally do so. Was this ruling correct? Yes. 

2. Will the grand master clothe district deputy grand masters with 
power to authorize such reopenings? No. 

3. A candidate was regularly proposed ; his petition was received by 
the lodge, and referred to a committee for investigation. Then it was 
discovered that the applicant had not resided for one year within the 
jurisdiction of the lodge. What course should the worshipful master 
take? Answer — He should direct the petition to be withdrawn. 

4. On a petition for initiation the ballot was taken ; the ballot box 
was inspected and placed upon the altar ; and, after a reasonable time, 
the worshipful master declared the result. Afterward the tyler objected 
to the validity of the ballot on the ground that he had not been given an 
opportunity to vote. Ruled, that the declaration by the master is final, 
and the ballot cannot be reopened. The tyler had a right to vote ; but 
he did not claim that right, and his neglect cannot affect the result. 

5. An applicant has partially lost his eyesight. He can find his way 
about the town, and can distinguish a coin when held close to his eyes, 
or a person's hand when held very near him. Ruled, that he is not 
eligible. 

In regard to the first decision, we can see no reason why the master 
should not have called a special meeting of his lodge and initiated the 
candidate, if,- in his opinion, the circumstances required speedy action, 
but, of course, he could not re-open a lodge meeting after it was regu- 
larly closed. In reference to No. 4, will say that in Illinois the tyler, 
if a member of the lodge, has a right to vote therein if he insists upon 
this privilege, but the master may at his request excuse him from the 
exercise of this right. The other rulings are sound, although a grand 
master who is not a strict constructionist might have ruled in favor of 
the applicant mentioned in No. 5. 

The grand master stated that in February, 1909, he caused one thous- 
and dollars to be sent to the Grand Lodge of Italy for the relief of the 
sufferers from the earthquake in Sicily and Calabria, and read a grate- 
ful letter of thanks from the grand master of Italy acknowledging re- 
ceipt of the same. He called attention to the fact that contributions to 
the semi-centennial benevolent fund had not been as liberal as he had 
expected, and said : 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 57 

When we reflect that, during the year, the expenditures of grand 
lodge exceeded its receipts . by nearly $4,000, and that the excess of ex- 
penditure was largely due to increase in the benevolent grants, it will 
be seen that many brethren who proclaim charity to be the chief of 
Masonic virtues, permit their deeds to fall very far behind their pro- 
fessions. There are no less than forty-five lodges in the jurisdiction 
whose members have not contributed a penny to this fund. And only 
sixty lodges are on the honor roll of those which have paid the full 
amount, or more than the full amount, their representatives in grand 
lodge in 1904 pledged them to pay. 

It is a sad fact that some lodges, which have contributed nothing to 
the fund, continue to send in appeals to grand lodge for assistance to 
their needy members. These appeals receive the same consideration as 
those from lodges which are contributors to the fund. These bodies, 
apparently, are willing to remain in the position of doing nothing for 
the benevolence of grand lodge, but of being a burden upon its char- 
itable fund. 

The last quoted paragraph indicates that some of our Canadian breth- 
ren have doubts as to the correctness of the ancient statement that it is 
more blessed to give than to receive. 

The grand master reported having removed from office a district 
deputy grand master for neglect of duty, and under the heading of 
"Use of Lodge Rooms," said : 

In March of this year I learned that a lodge in the western part of 
the province had permitted a society of ladies called the Order of the 
Eastern Star, to meet in the lodge room. I instructed the district 
deputy grand master to admonish the worshipful master of the lodge 
that this could not be permitted. Section 231 of the constitution says : 
"It is improper to allow a lodge room to be used jointly with other 
societies, or for other than Masonic purposes. This, however, shall not 
be construed as excluding bodies that claim to be Masonic, and are 
founded on Craft Masonry." The order of the Eastern Star cannot be 
founded on Craft Masonry, as women are not admitted to our order. 
If, therefore, the body in question is Masonic, it practices spurious and 
clandestine Masonry ; and it is a Masonic offence to have "Masonic 
communion with clandestine Masons or irregular bodies." If it is not 
Masonic, the use of our lodge rooms is denied to it by section 231 of 
the constitution already quoted. The worshipful master of the lodge 
implicated pleaded that he believed the Eastern Star to be a body 
founded on Craft Masonry ; but he acknowledged his error, and prom- 
ised obedience to the constitution. Therefore I did not pursue the mat- 
ter any further. 

I have some reason to think that other lodges are violating section 
231 of the constitution ; and, at my desire, the grand secretary lias 
made enquiry of district deputy grand masters if this law is strictly ob- 
served. 

We are at a loss to understand how a lodge room can be too sacred 
for the mothers, wives, sisters and daughters of Masons to meet there- 
in, when associated together as members of a sewing-circle, relief corps 
or any other respectable society, if the lodge is not in session. 



58 APPENDIX PART I. 



During the year five lodges were constituted, five others instituted, 
five dispensations continued from the previous year, four lodge rooms 
dedicated, and five corner-stones laid. 

M.W. Bro. John Ross Robertson presented the grand lodge with a 
"full set of undress clothing for the use of all the officers," and the 
grand lodge paid the sum of $24.50 for having the "undress regalia" 
photographed. It is a good thing for the grand lodge treasury that no 
photographs were made of the "full-dress" regalia. 

From the report on the condition of Masonry we quote the fol- 
lowing : 

One D.D.G.M. states, that in his district the Master Mason's apron 
is withheld from the Master Mason until he passes an examination in 
the third degree. This can only be done when the lodge presents an 
apron as a gift, because when the candidate receives the degree he is 
clothed with the proper badge, and no lodge can prevent him purchas- 
ing and wearing the insignia of his rank. 

The above method of coercing the brethren into learning the cate- 
chism has the doubtful merit of being unique. The report contains this 
sensible remark in regard to insurance : 

The board finds that the sound business principle of insuring against 
loss by fire very generally prevails. At the same time its attention has 
been called to the fact that a few lodges have been handicapped and 
their progress and usefulness retarded by losing their lodge rooms and 
effects by fire. Therefore, the board urges upon all lodges the wisdom 
of insuring their property against loss by fire. 

The committee on revision of the ceremonies evidently believed that 
the grand lodge should not undertake to control lodges in trivial mat- 
ters, when it said : 

With regard to the letter from Doric Lodge, Brantford, asking the 
sanction by grand lodge of an emblem to be used by them on their 
stationery, medals, buttons, seals, etc., a copy of which is attached to 
their letter, your committee feel and recommend that grand lodge should 
not commit itself to the adoption by any lodge of an emblem, for if 
once recognized by grand lodge, they will be bothered in the future 
with matters in which they have no constitutional concern at present. 

Grand Treasurer E. T. Malone reports receipts and balance of $51,- 
4S4, and expenditures of $41,350. Of the latter amount, $24,362 was 
for "benevolent orders." Additional grants brought the benevolence 
of the grand lodge up to $27,485, and the "private lodges," as our 
Canadian brethren term them, expended for charity $17,000. Although 
but one application for assistance was rejected by the committee on 
benevolence, care was evidently taken to spend the money with -discrim- 
ination as the benevolent grants were inspected at a cost of $750. 

The report on correspondence is by M.W. Bro. Henry Robertson 
and consists of 140 pages of well-written reviews of sixty-three grand 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 59 

lodges, of which he devotes two and a half pages to Illinois. He quotes 
from Grand Master Bell's address and Brother Robbins' report and 
commends both. In his Arkansas review he gives one of the best ac- 
counts we have seen of the coronation of Bro. Fay Hempstead as poet 
laureate of Freemasonry, at Chicago, October 5, 1908. 

Daniel F. Macwatt, of Hamilton, elected grand master ; R. L. 
Gunn, of Hamilton, re-elected grand secretary. 



COLORADO, 1908. 

48th Annual. Denver. September 21. 

The Colorado volume carries portraits of Andrew Sagendorf, one of 
the pioneers who settled at what is now Denver in 1858, and was grand 
master in 1883, and John B. Haffy, the incoming grand master. There 
is also a cut of the first Masonic hall, a log structure, where the Masons 
met informally in 1858, and out of whose gathering grew the first lodge 
in Denver (then called Auraria), of which Brother Sagendorf was the 
first treasurer. He is still hale and hearty at the age of 80. Twenty- 
two past grand masters were present at the opening and twenty-three 
at the close, of whom the senior is Henry M. Teller, the ambassador 
from Illinois ; forty-seven other grand representatives were present. 

Among the special dispensations reported in the address of the grand 
master (Joseph A. Davis) were two authorizing elections and installa- 
tions at other than the stated dates, the lodges at such dates being in 
the grip of the health authorities, who had prohibited all public meetings 
on account of contagious diseases. Seven decisions were reported, as fol- 
lows : 

1. A young man having completed the term of his enlistment in the 
U. S. naval service, returning to the home of his parents, may claim 
their home as his fixed abode, and may at once petition for the degrees 
of Masonry. 

2. A stockholder and manager of a general merchandise and saloon 
business is ineligible to receive Masonic degrees. 

3. A member of a lodge, who has been granted a dimit, but did not 
receive a certificate of his dimission, is nevertheless a dimitted Mason, 
and must petiton in regular form for affiliation. A lodge can not pass 
a resolution restoring the brother to membership the same as if no 
dimit had been asked for or granted. 

4. A petition for affiliation having been read in open lodge and a 
committee appointed to report thereon, must stand as any other petition, 



60 APPENDIX PART I. 



and be balloted upon, and cannot be withdrawn at the will and pleasure 
of the petitioner. 

5. A brother applying for a dimit cannot withdraw the application 
after the same is before the lodge for action. 

6. A rejected candidate for Masonic degrees who resides within 
the jurisdiction of two or more lodges holding concurrent jurisdic- 
tion, may, at the expiration of six months, petition any lodge holding 
concurrent jurisdiction with the lodge that rejected him. 

7. A worshipful master of a lodge has not the right to call a past 
master to preside over a lodge during a Masonic trial wherein the wor- 
shipful master is a witness. The senior warden must preside. In case 
of his absence, the junior warden must preside. 

All these passed muster except No. 5, upon which the following dis- 
senting opinion of the committee on jurisprudence was properly sus- 
tained : 

In the opinion of your committee, such an application may be 
withdrawn at any time before the same has become final. We, therefore, 
recommend that this decision be not approved. 

Unless their statute law stands in the way, we are strongly of the 
opinion that No. 4 should have shared the same fate. Our own law per- 
mits the withdrawal of a petition for affiliation upon written application 
therefor, and the concurrence of a majority of the members present at a 
stated meeting. The provision for the written application is manifestly 
proper, but we know of no Masonic reasons why the lodge should have 
any voice in the matter. The affiliation should at all stages be voluntary. 
We regard No. 1 as good law. No. 2 reflects only the unwarrantable 
class legislation of the jurisdiction. No. 3 should go without saying 
anywhere. No. 6 must be read in the light of the fact that in Colorado 
the personal jurisdiction obtained by the rejection of the candidate lasts 
but six months. No. 7 is but a restatement of the Masonic axiom that 
in the absence or disability of the master, the ranking warden present 
succeeds to all his powers and duties ; but in the absence of an enacted 
regulation to the contrary we know of no reason why the generally con- 
ceded power of the master to call any qualified brother to the chair to 
conduct the business and work of the lodge should not be held to in- 
clude the right to avail himself of the aid of a specially qualified member 
in the conduct of a trial, the master, of course, being present and re- 
sponsible for such conduct, as in other matters. 

Six pages of the grand master's address chronicle the work of the 
circumlocution office. Through the whole record runs the assumption 
by the grand masters at each end of the line that executive permis- 
sion is necessary to enable a lodge to confer a degree at the request of 
a lodge in another grand jurisdiction upon a candidate of the latter. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 61 

Brother Greenleaf j the able and accomplished Colorado Reviewer, who 
recognizes in this practice the destruction of the natural, and, until re- 
cently, unquestioned rights of the lodges, confesses that so far a diligent 
search has not disclosed a scrap of Colorado law to justify this ground- 
less assumption of the grand masters, but as yet no effective protest has 
been made. Colorado saloon-keepers have never been reckoned as harm- 
less as doves ; neither are they wise as serpents. In passing through 
the streets of Alamosa on the eve of St. John's Day, the grand master 
found the saloons decorated for the morrow, and learned that the pro- 
prietor of one of the chief of them was a member of the local lodge, 
whereupon he ordered the master of the lodge to direct the junior 
warden to prefer charges against the offending irrigator, and practically 
told him that upon a" failure of the lodge to convict of unmasonic con- 
duct he must take an appeal. Thus the joint keeper's lure attracted more 
attention than he thought of in advance. 

The grand master's recommendation that the length of residence re- 
quired for a petitioner for the degrees be shortened for officers of the 
army and navy was not turned down cold, for, although the period was 
not shortened, the law, presupposing for them a permanent residence 
somewhere, was so changed as to permit, without the requisite one year's 
residence, the earlier reception of a petition for the purpose of asking 
for a Waiver of jurisdiction. This, we think, brings their practice into 
practical accord with that generally prevailing elsewhere. His recom- 
mendations that the membership list of the lodges be no longer pub- 
lished, and that the law respecting objection to advancement be modified, 
were negatived. 

The report of the committee on address has a common, but none 
the less grievous fault, that it blankets in approval all that portion of 
the address not specifically referred. As a rule the grand lodge does 
not have in mind the points in the residue of the address, and conspic- 
uous examples have not been wanting where mischievous legislation, that 
would not have borne the light of discussion, has slipped through in this 
way. 

The necrological report of Past Grand Master Greenleaf is, as usual, 
clad in language of euphony and beauty. We make no apology for giv- 
ing space to the following, which he quotes from some author to us 
unknown : 

From these closed eyes, and these white lips 

Where loving smiles no longer play, 
What to the ear that silence hears, 
Does Death to us, the living, say? 

"Sweet friends, the words of love you wish 
You'd said to me while I could hear; 



62 APPENDIX PART I. 



Take heed, in days to come, you speak 
To living ones who still are near. 

"No more for me can you do aught, 

Save make the flowers bloom where I sleep ; 
But hearts of living ones still ache, 
And eyes of living ones still weep. 

"Pour out on them the love and care 
You wish you could on me bestow ; 
Then, when some other falls asleep, 
O'er vain regrets no tears shall flow." 

Death, then, would teach us how to live, — 

How we shall die need give no care, — 
Live as we'll wish we had : and then 

Death's face becomes divinely fair. 

All Illinois Masons especially will be glad to learn from the fol- 
lowing report that the faith, courage and enterprise of the Grand Lodge 
of Colorado, in preserving to the craft the posthumous work of our 
Past Grand Master Bromwell has been fully justified: 

The H. P. H. Bromwell Publishing Company report that, in accord- 
ance with their report of last year, they have refunded to the grand 
lodge, through the grand secretary, one hundred dollars, being the 
balance in full of the money loaned for the publication of the work of 
Brother Past Grand Master H. P. H. Bromwell, and that already some- 
thing has been realized for his daughter. 

Thanking the grand lodge for ■ the use of these funds by which a 
lasting memorial has been erected to a , most worthy craftsman, and 
a deed of love done which will redound to the honor of this grand 
lodge for such generous action. 

The grand lodge chartered three new lodges ; listened to an elo- 
quent philosophical address from Melvin Edwards, the grand orator ; 
refused to relieve lodges having one hundred or more members from 
the operation of the law prohibiting fees for affiliation ; declared it 
tmmasonic for any brother to act as an attorney for the prosecution 
or defense in a Masonic case for pay; made it a condition for deliver- 
ing a dispensation for a new lodge that the proposed secretary shall 
pass a satisfactory examination in the duties of his office, before the 
grand secretary ; raised the compensation of the grand lecturer from 
three dollars to five dollars per day ; and properly sustained the action 
of a master of a lodge in refusing to entertain charges of dishonesty 
in a land deal on the part of the accused, while the same question was 
involved, in an action pending between the same parties in the civil 
courts of Colorado. 

The report on correspondence (179 pp.) is the twenty-fourth in con- 
secutive order from the facile and instructive pen of Past Grand Master 
Lawrence N. Greenleaf. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 63 

Following his usual plan, he largely leaves the discussion of im- 
portant questions before the fraternity to the "Conclusion" of his re- 
port, among these the circumlocution office comes in for his sensible 
animadversions : 

In the matter of conducting the correspondence of lodges in different 
jurisdictions through their respective grand masters, there is a wide 
diversity of opinion. We have not hesitated to oppose the practice as 
an invasion of the inherent rights of the lodges, and to declare that 
where it has been engrafted upon Craft Masonry, it has been copied 
from a similar enactment in a semi-military concordant grand body. 
The practice has crept into this jurisdiction of late years, but we have 
failed to find any law justifying the same, and in the absence of any 
such enactment, our lodges are at liberty to conduct their own affairs 
as they see proper, within constitutional limits. Our views on this 
question have been endorsed by some of the ablest writers, and should 
the matter come before our grand lodge for formal determination, we 
are certain there will be no unanimity of opinion. 

Of alleged Masonic governing bodies of clandestine origin, he says : 
Many grand orients of Scottish Rite origin are requesting recog- 
nition from grand lodges of the York Rite, but with indifferent suc- 
cess. In our opinion, as heretofore expressed, there must be some com- 
mon ground of agreement before such recognition can be generally 
extended. Whether complete severance of allegiance to supreme coun- 
cils will be regarded as sufficient to justify recognition, remains to be 
determined. 

And wisely he says of the "Past Rank" fad : 

In England and her colonies, past rank is still conferred and re- 
garded as a high distinction. In our opinion it is unmeaning and value- 
less. Active service in an office should alone confer past rank and 
distinction. In other words, honors should be earned. To make a 
brother a past grand master, past grand warden or past grand deacon 
for service rendered the craft in some other capacity, is to rob the office 
of its distinguishing significance. 

The proceedings of our grand lodge for 1907 furnish material for 
six and one-half pages of text and comment, reflecting a very thor- 
ough examination of the volume.. He summarizes the address of 
Grand Master Allen and the business of the session ; reproduces the 
lists of recognized, unrecognized and recognizable grand lodges as 
given in our special report, and quotes from the body of the report on 
the effect upon the sovereignty of the German grand lodges, of their 
confederation in the German grand lodge alliance or union. Among 
other matters in our general report, referred to by him, is the circum- 
locution office, or the passing of the correspondence of lodges in dif- 
ferent jurisdictions through their respective grand masters, on which 
subject he says : . 

We fail to find any law upon the subject in our Colorado co^c. 
Several successive grand masters have announced it as a rule o\ this 
jurisdiction, but we have been unable to locale it. We have hereto- 



64 



APPENDIX PART I. 



fore announced our opposition to it as an invasion of the inherent rights 
of the lodges and if it has acquired the semblance of a law through 
statement and re-statement, we shall advocate its repeal. 

Of our reference to the assumed suspension of officers of the new 
Grand Lodge of Queensland by a district grand master, as a veritable 
bull, he finds himself upon further consideration of the subject, inclin- 
ing to the same opinion, but as Colorado has recognized Queensland 
he is contented to regard all these matters as "ancient history." 

In concluding his notice of our report, he says : 

He takes occasion to administer another rap for our recognition 
of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, and for our indulgence in the 
hope that some way may be found to recognize grand lodges which 
have thrown off their allegiance to Supreme Councils. As a rule, 
however, Brother Robbins and ourselves agree on most subjects. 

His closing remark is the more gratifying to us because it seems to 
be increasingly true every year, thus indicating that the labors of neither 
have been wholly in vain. 

John B. Haffy, of Del Norte, was elected grand master; Charles 
H. Jacobson, Denver, was re-elected grand secretary. 



CONNECTICUT, 1909. 

121st Annual. New Haven. January 20. 

A half-tone of Grand Master Edward E. Fuller adorns the fly-leaf 
and is a good picture of a very attractive face. 

Ten past grand masters and the representatives of thirty-eight grand 
jurisdictions were present, the latter including Past Grand Master George 
E. Parsons, the appointee from Illinois. The volume is illustrated by a 
full page group photograph of thirteen of the principal officers of the 
grand lodge, showing that Connecticut Masons are not superstitious. 

There are also likenesses of P.G.M.'s John H. Barlow and Dwight 
Waugh, deceased, to each of whom a memorial page is dedicated. 

The name of Loyal L. Munn, past grand secretary of Illinois, is 
given a prominent place in the obituary roll. A report is made of five 
emergent communications of the grand lodge, two of them being for the 
funerals of the two past grand masters above mentioned ; one to dedicate 
a Masonic hall, one to place a corner-stone and the fifth to lay the "final 
stone" of a bridge at Hartford. The latter was pre-eminently the Masonic 
occasion of the year in Connecticut, extended notice of what was a really 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 65 

notable event being given in the reports of the grand master, the deputy 
grand master and the grand secretary. 

Fortunately for those who are interested in public observances, the 
grand master's report contains the full ceremonial used on the occasion. 
The placing of a "final stone" is to us a new occasion for a Masonic 
ceremony, and the ritual is new to our experience, though made up largely 
from the forms commonly used in the laying of corner-stones and the 
dedication of halls, the emblems being made to do double duty. We 
commend this addition to our ritualistic forms to such of our brethren 
as are interested in finding and utilizing new places for the public display 
of Masonry and its ceremonies. Personally we do not sympathize with an 
idea which has the advertising of the institution for its principal if not 
its only excuse for being. 

The grand master reported the granting of a number of dispensations 
to waive jurisdiction or to confer degrees upon candidates residing in a 
state other than that in which the lodge is located. We have so far been 
unable to discover any ancient usage or well-founded modern law for the 
justification of this superfluous circumlocution office, or that makes the 
intervention of a grand master necessary in matters concerning which the 
lodges interested should be the sole judges, provided only, that their pro- 
ceedings are regular and with due regard to the rights of members. 

Among the decisions reported by the grand master are the following : 
Question : When a candidate having been regularly voted for, has 
been declared duly elected, can a demand for a new ballot be made within 
a few minutes thereafter, by a brother who was present at the ballot, and 
voted favorably? Answer: Yes. A brother can call for a new ballot 
at any time previous to the administering of the obligation in the Master 
Mason's degree. The matter of its being only a few minutes after the 
ballot is. declared, makes no difference. 

Question : What standing in a lodge has a brother who having pre- 
sented his dimit, has been duly elected, but has allowed several months 
to elapse, without attending the lodge or signing the by-laws? We have 
now found that we do not want this brother in our lodge. Answer : Al- 
though the brother has been duly elected to membership in your lodge, 
he is not a member until he has signed your by-laws, and at any time 
previous to his signing them, you can at the request of any brother of your 
lodge, or of your own volition as master of your lodge, call for a new 
ballot. 

These were both sustained by the grand lodge, although the committee 
on jurisprudence, to whom they were referred, reported that: 

Your committee endorses all of the grand master's decisions with 
one exception. We hold that the signing of the by-laws of a lodge 
is a mere matter of technicality and custom, that the act of acquiring 
membership by a non-affiliate is complete by the consent of the lodge 
expressed by a unanimous ballot which cannot otherwise be revoked, and 
by the deposit of a regular dimit by the brother. 



66 APPENDIX PART I. 



The action of the grand lodge on this point was : 

That the signing of the roll of membership should be, is, shall be 
and shall continue to be, a requisite to membership in the lodge, either 
by affiliation or by receiving the degrees within that lodge. 

The first of these decisions shows that in Connecticut the staying of 
initiation may be accomplished through the demand for and the granting 
of a new ballot. In Illinois practically the same end is reached by ob- 
jection lodged with the master. 

Reference is made to the efforts of charlatans to establish clandestine 
lodges and to fatten their purses at the expense of dupes who are willing 
to purchase spurious Masonry at bargain counter rates. Upon this subject 
the following resolution was passed : 

That a committee of five be appointed who shall serve during the 
coming year and whose duty it shall be to take such action in the legis- 
lature or before a committee thereof, or otherwise, as in their judgment 
may seem best to obtain the passage of such laws as will be for the pro- 
tection of the order and prevent unscrupulous persons imposing upon the 
societies of the state of Connectxut in the name of Freemasonry. 

We shall await with interest the report of this committee. 

The following resolution, which seems to us to have much to recom- 
mend it, was passed after discussion : 

Resolved, That every lodge within this grand jurisdiction accepting 
a member by affiliation, be required to notify the lodge granting the dimit 
that the candidate named therein has been accepted, in order that the 
same be noted in the minutes of the lodge receiving said notice, provided 
the lodge receiving same be within this grand jurisdiction. 

In the concluding remarks of an able and business-like address the 
grand master says : 

Let us not fail to remember that this magnificent structure of Ancient 
Craft Masonry, the admiration of the wise, the fear of the prejudiced, and 
the loved and venerated institution through the ages of those who have 
been inscribed on its roll of membership, has come to us as an inheritance 
from the dim and misty past, and has been transmitted to us, pure and 
unimpaired, by the countless host of Masonic brethren, who have with 
great patience and perseverance, amid manifold privations and sacrifices, 
and at times great persecution and obloquy, trod the checkered pavement, 
and performed their many and various labors of love and charity. 

Let us not forget our debt to those who have preceded us, but show 
our appreciation of their priceless gift to us, by transmitting it, pure and 
unimpaired, to those who shall come after us, and not through selfishness 
and neglect doom it to decay and oblivion, to be dumped, a worn out and 
useless thing, on the ever-growing ash-heap of the centuries. 

The report on correspondence (164 pp.) by Frank W. Havens, past 
grand master, opens with the following beautiful tribute : 

In loving memory of M.W. John Henry Barlow, who for fourteen 
years reviewed the proceedings and wrote with unfeigned wisdom these 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 67 



pages of fraternal correspondence. He fell asleep June 16, 1908, full of 
years and crowned with honors. 

And closes with these words, which come to us with especial signifi- 
cance : 

Some half dozen of the foregoing were left by Brother Barlow, the 
last of his Masonic work. 

We have made no attempt to review proceedings published in a foreign 
language. All others that have come to us have had attention. The 
writing of these pages has been very much hurried, and we crave the 
patient indulgence of the reader. If it should fall to our lot to write 
again we hope it will be at greater leisure. Again craving pardon for 
mistakes and omissions with assurances that any such are indeed of the 
head and not of the heart. 

He gives four and one-half pages to Illinois, reviewing our session of 
1908. He says of Grand Master Bell that in his address "he comes down 
to business at once, that his decisions are mostly of local import, that he 
does not believe in Masons attending church as such and gives good 
reasons for the faith that is in him." 

He makes the very conspicuous and almost inexcusable error of say- 
ing that the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico received recognition, when 
the fact is that a special committee was appointed to consider this question 
and report in 1909. He gives nearly a page of quotation from Grand 
Orator Beach's oration, which he characterizes as interesting and elo- 
quent. He refers with appreciation to the full and exhaustive report of 
our Bro. Robbins on correspondence, and gives a hearty "Amen" to his 
remarks about reinstating members who have been long unaffiliated. 

Weston G. Grannip, grand master, Litchfield ; Frank W. Havens, 
grand secretary, Hartford. 



DELAWARE, 1908. 

103rd Annual. Wilmington. October 7. 

The resolute face of Grand Master Thomas J. Day greets the reader 
on opening the proceedings, and prepares one to expect a record of a 
business-like meeting. Thirteen past grand masters are listed as present 
and thirty-two members of the diplomatic corps participated in the meet- 
ing, among them M.W. Bro. George Massey Jones, the representative of 
Illinois. Noticing that the minutes say that "The M.W. Grand Lodge 
was called to order at twelve o'clock (noon) by the M.W. Grand Master." 
we wondered whether there were any opening ceremonies, but conclude 
that there must have been some, because by reference to the closing record 



68 APPENDIX PART I. 



on the following day we read that "No further business being offered, 
prayer was made by the R.W. Grand Chaplain and the M.W. Grand 
Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Delaware was closed in 
due and ample form and in harmony at 4 :10 o'clock P. M." 

True to the promise conveyed by his portrait, the grand master pre- 
sented a terse but clear address giving a resume of the work of the year. 
He reports three special communications of the grand lodge, at Milford, 
Jan. 23, to dedicate a hall, at Lewes, May 21, to lay the corner stone 
of the town hall and at Wilmington, Aug. 15, to lay the corner stone 
of a church. He refers to the death of Bro. Elihu J. Morris, past senior 
grand warden, and of several past masters. He is able to say that dur- 
ing his year's administration he had visited every lodge in the jurisdiction, 
which reminds us that there are some very pleasurable advantages in 
being in a jurisdiction not too large to make this possible. He also 
notes his happy experience in visits to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania 
and New Jersey, where he was suitably received and entertained ; but 
his most enjoyable outing appears to have been on the occasion of his 
visit to Boston, where he participated in the exercises incident to the 
celebration of the 175th anniversary of St. John's Lodge of Massachusetts, 
the oldest Masonic lodge in existence on this continent. 

Under the head of correspondence we find the following, which con- 
veys the only intimation we find in the volume that the writer hereof had 
been in correspondence with his office : 

That the correspondence between this grand lodge, the lodges of 
this jurisdiction and the grand lodges with which we are in fraternal re- 
lations might be conducted in a manner that would be abreast of the times 
of today and that the necessary work could be accomplished with greater 
dispatch, I instructed the grand secretary to procure a typewriter for his 
office, which has been done, and I feel sure that the recipients of the cor- 
respondence from his office will have very much less trouble in decipher- 
ing the same than we have had in trying to get the correct idea con- 
veyed in some of the writings that we have received during the past year. 

Dispensations were granted to confer degrees out of time and to hold 
meetings at other times and places than those named in the lodge by-laws. 
He congratulates the chairman of the several lodges of instruction for 
their zeal and fidelity in performing their duties, and expresses the opinion 
that the work of the jurisdiction was never in better condition. In this im- 
mediate connection and, perhaps, as a corollary of the above he says un- 
der the heading "Decisions :" 

That the brethren of the several lodges are well informed of the 
laws and regulations laid down by this grand lodge and that peace and 
harmony prevails within our borders, there is no better evidence than the 
fact that I have not been called upon to render a decision. In two or three 
instances it was necessary to call their attention to the existing law, but 
there has not been a question referred to me that required anything more 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 69 

than a direction to the regulations governing the same that have been 
previously adopted by this grand lodge. 

The report of the grand secretary shows a membership of 3,988, a 
gain of 100 over the previous year. From the report of the committee 
on by-laws it appears that in Delaware amendments to lodge by-laws 
must be submitted to the grand ledge for approval. 

The report on correspondence is by R.W. Bro. L. H. Jackson, P.D. 

G.M. He gives one and one-half of his seventy-two pages to Illinois 
and summarizes the business of our session of 1907 in a manner that 
shows careful reading. He expresses appreciation and admiration of the 
work of M.W. Bro. Robbins, our correspondent. 

Henry I. Beers. Jr.. Dover, grand master; Yirgixius V. Harbison, 

Wilmington, grand secretary. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 1908. 

9Sth Annual. Washington. December 16. 

The fly-leaf of this volume carries a striking half-tone likeness of 
the bright and cheery face of Augustus B. Coolidge, grand master. Fol- 
lowing the usual custom, quarterly communications of the grand lodge 
were held. The first of these was March 14. 190S. and was given over 
to ritualistic observances. The esoteric portions of the three degrees 
were exemplified. The grand master expressed his gratification at the 
interest shown and complimented Brother Lichliter. grand lecturer, and 
the other degree officers on the excellence of their work. 

The second quarterly was held May 13, 190S. An interesting question 
arose respecting appeals from lodge trials. The grand constitution pro- 
vides that "in all cases of suspension or expulsion resulting from a trial 
an appeal may be taken to the grand lodge, notice of which appeal must 
be filed with the grand secretary within thirty days after judgment shall 
have been made known to the brother." As no provision is herein made 
for an appeal in case of an acquittal the grievance committee reported in 
favor of submitting the question to the committee on jurisprudence. 
The latter committee expressed the opinon that such an appeal should 
be allowed and submitted an amendment to the constitution providing 
therefor. This amendment went over for action till the May meeting. 
1909. A special communication of the grand lodge was held September 
19, 1908, for the purpose of dedicating the new temple. The usual cere- 
monials were observed. We give the following extract from the grand 
master's address on the occasion : 



70 APPENDIX PART I. 



Mr. President and Brethren: With these ceremonies peculiar to 
our ancient order, we dedicate tonight this beautiful temple. More than 
a century ago, when our country was young and when the Federal City 
was little more than a hope, this gavel was first used by the immortal 
Washington. Since that time, the nation, which he loved and for which 
he fought, has grown to be a world power, and the Federal City which 
he conceived and which bears his name has become a model municipality, 
rivaling in attractiveness the most renowned cities of the world. It is 
not too much to say that in this growth and position Masonry has been 
a material factor. To the architectural beauty of the capital it is now 
contributing this building. This is not to be simply a home for the craft. 
It is a monument to Masonry. It stands as an evidence of the influence 
of its teachings. It speaks for the power of the principles it inculcates. 
It has cost thousands — hundreds of thousands, of dollars. It has cost 
labor and sacrifice on the part of the membership. The world will never 
know, and few of us fully realize, how much we owe to those who have 
had this enterprise in charge, particularly the president and executive 
committee of the Masonic Temple Association. To the careful thought 
and planning, the patient and untiring efforts of these brethren, to their 
abiding faith in the face of unforeseen obstacles, to the enthusiasm they 
have been able to inspire, is due in very large measure the consumma- 
tion of our hopes. Today we have a Masonic temple of which we may 
well be proud, artistic in design, commodious in construction, commen- 
surate with the dignity and standing of our time-honored institution. 
The same loyalty and love for the order, the same pride in its reputa- 
tion and welfare which has rendered the erection of this building pos- 
sible, will insure its preservation and will prove an impregnable guard 
against injury in the future. 

Thirty-eight years ago the temple which we are about to vacate was 
dedicated, and the brethren were then rejoicing that a building had been 
provided adequate to their needs. Masonry has kept pace with the 
growth and advancement of the community, and since then the juris- 
diction has quadrupled in membership. Tonight we have reason to feel 
that our ambition regarding a temple has been realized, but it will be a 
matter for congratulation if the coming years shall show that growth 
and that advancement which may prove this magnificent edifice unsuit- 
able, and if within the lifetime of some of us the grand lpdge may dedi- 
cate another Masonic temple, a grander and even more imposing struc- 
ture, to our use. 

May Masonry in the District of Columbia continue to grow, not only 
in numbers, but in strength. May its influence for all that is elevating 
and ennobling be more and more recognized. May Masonic ideals be 
here taught and here cherished, and may the virtue and benevolence, the 
uprightness of character of its members, be as conspicuous in the com- 
munity as is this beautiful temple we dedicate tonight. 

The third quarterly communication was held September 26, 1908, and 
was the last meeting held in the old temple. The grand chaplain, Bro. 
Joseph Dawson, made an eloquent address, from which we extract the 
following: 

There are two words which come to my mind, and will serve as the 
theme of my address, namely "sentiment" and "sacrifice." The first word 
reigns supreme in human life. There is a whole world that lies between 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 71 

sentiment and sentimentality. Sentiment is the red of the dawn, painted 
by the ringer of God ; sentimentality is your garish chromograph. Sen- 
timent is power ; sentimentality is ever the dissipation of power. The 
great oratorio is the expression of sentiment. Because people of narrow 
vision have confused sentiment with sentimentality, the beauty and peace 
of sentiment in life have not received their due recognition. Sentiment 
is three parts of life. Sentiment is the logic of the heart, and is a far 
bigger thing than the logic of the head. 

A special communication of the grand lodge was held November 19, 
190S, for the purpose of laying the corner-stone of a building to be 
occupied by William R. Singleton Lodge No. 30, Tennallytown. 

The annual communication was held December 16, 1908, at the new 
Masonic temple, corner of New York avenue and Thirteenth and H 
streets, Northwest. Fourteen past grand masters were present. Past 
Grand Master William H. Nichols of the Grand Lodge of Texas was 
fraternally greeted and invited to a seat in the East. We extract the 
following from the address of the grand master : 

As we gather at this, the ninety-eighth annual communication, the first 
in this beautiful new temple, it should be with hearts filled with grati- 
tude to our Supreme Grand Master for the prosperity which has at- 
tended our labors, for the blessings which are ours, for the bright 
prospects the future offers. In the review of the year there is nowhere 
to be found a suspicion of discord. Intelligent and faithful officers and 
interested members have worked together for the upbuilding of our 
lodges and the advancement of Masonic ideals. The ranks of those who 
have served as officers of this grand body remain unbroken. The year 
closes with largely increased numbers on our rolls, with peace and har- 
mony abounding, with brighter hopes, with greater possibilities for ac- 
complishment than ever before. 

The only decision reported by the grand master relates to the phys- 
ical qualifications of a petitioner. We refer to this principally to show 
that the District of Columbia is no exception to the rule that brethren 
expect the Grand Master to decide many questions which are entirely 
outside his province and which the brethren themselves are fully com- 
petent to determine. 

Under the head of work the grand master gives the following sta- 
tistics : 

The reports show the year just ended to have been one of the most 
prosperous in our history in the amount of work done in our lodges 
The number raised has been larger than ever before, and with one ex- 
ception the net gain has been greater than in any other year. Three 
lodges report net losses in membership, which is largely due to an un- 
usual number of deaths and withdrawals, and in no case the result of 
lack of interest on the part of officers or members. During the year 
573 have been initiated. 555 passed, 555 raised. 174 affiliated, and 55 re- 
instated; 186 have withdrawn, 150 have died, 09 have been dropped for 
non-payment of dues, 1 suspended, and 1 expelled. At the beginning of 
the year, the jurisdiction numbered 8.303. On September 30. 1908, ouv 



72 APPENDIX PART I. 



membership was 8,740, a net gain of 377. Ninety-two have been re- 
jected, which is an indication that care is being exercised in the selection 
of material. 

We also give place to the following account of what he terms their 
housewarming : 

The "House Warming," extending from September 28 to October 10, 
was one of the most satisfactory enterprises in which the fraternity has 
been engaged in the financial interest of the new temple. It gave the 
brethren and the .public an opportunity to inspect the building, and the 
entertainments furnished by the efficient and hard working committees 
in charge were very enjoyable to the thousands who attended. It 
was not anticipated that the receipts would approach the amount realized 
at any of our fairs, but from present indications the net proceeds will be 
between $9,000 and $10,000, which will be of material assistance to the 
Masonic Temple Association in meeting obligations unforseseen at the 
time of commencing building operations. 

From a special report from the correspondence committee we note 
the following and are pleased to see that the recommendation of the 
committee was adopted : 

We beg leave to invite the attention of the grand lodge to the fact 
that the three existing district grand lodges in Queensland, namely, of 
the English, Scottish and Irish constitutions, are not sovereign or even 
autonomous grand lodges. Their grand masters are appointed from 
across the sea. From the report in the proceedings it appears that many 
individual members, and some whole ledges, have gone over to the sov- 
ereign grand lodge. 

Many of our American grand lodges have given formal recognition 
to the sovereign Grand Lodge of Queensland, namely, Illinois, New Jer- 
sey, Wyoming, Kansas and others. 

From this last report, quoted above, it appears that the number of 
lodges of the foreign constitution is being amplified, even by dual mem- 
bership. Thus it will appear that it will be impossible for the new 
grand lodge to get a majority, or even a plurality, of lodges in the state. 

If we desire to adhere to the American plan of planting but one 
sovereign grand lodge in one and the same state, we may, with pro- 
priety, extend the principle to Queensland. Hitherto the grand lodges 
of North America have regarded the district grand lodges of Queens- 
land as in the category of autonomous grand lodges, which, in the opin- 
ion of your committee, we were not obliged to do. 

Your committee therefore begs leave to recommend that formal rec- 
ognition be now accorded the sovereign Grand Lodge of Queensland, of 
which M.W. Bro. Lord Chelmsford is grand master, and R.W. Bro. 
Charles H. Harley is grand secretary. 

Bro. Kenton N. Harper, historian of the grand lodge, made a report 
of progress, gave the headings of seventeen chapters which he had pre- 
pared, and made the following recommendation which was adopted : 

While no definite authorization has as yet been given by the grand 
lodge as to the scope of the work, the concensus of opinon among those 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 73 



with whom the- historian has advised favors the preparation, in addition 
to the above, of sketches of the individual lodges, living and extinct, and 
of the several more prominent appendant orders, together with biog- 
raphies of those local Masons who have won especial distinction in fra- 
ternity circles. 

In the absence of contrary instructions the historian has gathered 
considerable material for use along these latter lines, and is gradually 
assembling it, but, naturally, prefers to be guided in the near future by 
some expressions of this body. 

Therefore, because of this desire, and also by reason of the fact that 
early action defining all points connected with the publication of the 
work is imperatively necessary, the historian recommends that authority 
be given for the appointment, early in the ensuing year, of a publishing 
committee of three, whose duty it shall be to present to the grand lodge 
all the data touching the character, scope, and probably cost of the work, 
and under the supervision of which the publication shall proceed as di- 
rected by this grand body. 

From the headings of the chapters we are prepared to expect that 
when published this will be a book of general interest to the fraternity. 

Upon motion of Past Grand Master Francis J. Woodman a commit- 
tee proposed in the following resolution was appointed. We shall be 
interested to learn the results of their deliberations, because it seems to 
us that the question whether property shall be owned directly by lodges 
or by building associations is an important one : 

Whereas, The erection of the new Masonic temple has been com- 
pleted, and as it seems to be the prevailing opinion among the fraternity 
of this jurisdiction that the title as well as the control of the property 
should be vested in the grand lodge; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the Masonic Temple Association requests the Grand 
Lodge of the District of Columbia to appoint a committee of five to 
meet with a similar committee from the Masonic Temple Association 
for the purpose of conferring as to the advisability and the best means 
to adopt in order that the title and control of the property may become 
vested in the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia. 

Following their usual custom the grand lodge held a St. John's Day 
communication in December, the principal business transacted being the 
election and installation of grand officers. The report contains a bio- 
graphical sketch of Most Worshipful Brother Augustus B. Coolidge, a 
custom which we would be glad to see more generally adopted. The 
report on correspondence is by Past Grand Master George W. Baird 
and consists of 145 pages, of which three are given to Illinois. 

The proceedings of our annual communication of 1908 are summarized 
in a way to show careful reading. Pleasant allusion is made to the 
reception given Bro. Fay Hempstead, the poet laureate, whose address 
on the occasion is characterized as a charming one. He says oi the 



74 APPENDIX PART I. 



report of our committee on appeals and grievances that- it is ideal; that 
there is enough in it for the essential information of the members of 
the grand lodge, and quite enough for all other readers to understand 
that right and justice prevail in the grand lodge. He gives high praise 
to our Past Grand Master Joseph Robbins for his report on Masonic 
correspondence. It is pleasant to transcribe the following from the close 
of his report : 

The subject of "cypher ritual" is mentioned in several of the grand 
lodge reports, but nowhere so forcibly as in an address by the Hon. Henry 
H. Ingersoll, secretary of the committee on jurisprudence of the Grand 
Lodge of Tennessee. It has long been a question in the mind of the 
writer, as to how any individual Mason, and more especially a body of 
Free and Accepted Masons, can reconcile their first obligation with the 
authorization of the cypher ritual. But they continue to print it and I 
have no doubt copies are lost now and then. Indeed, this is not denied. 

Bro. Ingersoll says Freemasonry has as essential certain secrets of 
ritual which it, conceals and never reveals to anyone outside the order; 
that these ancient mysteries are only communicated verbally, and that it 
is likewise forbidden to expose them in printing or in any kind of 
marking. That no individual Mason is exempt from the obligation _ of 
profound secrecy and no human power can authorize him to write, print, 
etc., any of these secrets. Bro. Ingersoll believes that these secrets are 
the ancient landmarks which no body of men are at liberty to make in- 
novations in. 

Henry K. Simpson, grand master, Masonic Temple, Washington, 
D. C. ; Arvine W. Johnston, grand secretary, Masonic Temple, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



FLORIDA, 1909. 

» 

80th Annual. Jacksonville. January 19. 

This unpretentious volume, printed in type of generous size, bears 
upon its opening pages pictures of the new Masonic temple at Jackson- 
ville and of the Masonic temple at Tallahassee, where the Grand Lodge 
of Florida was organized July 6, 1830. The new temple was dedicated 
January 20, 1909, and presents an attractive exterior, having the appear- 
ance of good, square and solid work. There is also a picture of Past 
Grand Master William E. Anderson (1881-82), who died November 12, 
1908, at the age of seventy-five years. The record opens with an account 
of four special communications of the grand lodge to lay corner-stones 
of the Lafayette county court house at Mayo, June 3, 1908 ; Masonic 
temple at Gainesville, September 9, 1908 ; Osceola high school at Kissim- 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 75 



mee, October 15, 1908 ; Polk county court house at Bartow, December 
17, 1908. 

At the annual communication which opened at Jacksonville, January 
19, 1909, there were present M.W. Bro. Elmer E. Haskell, grand mas- 
ter, a full line of associate grand officers, eight past grand masters, 
eighteen district deputy grand masters, seventeen past masters "here in 
no other capacity," and forty-five of the diplomatic staff, in which Illinois 
was represented by James C. Craver. 

In the address of the grand master is given a carefully prepared and 
detailed account of his official acts and much information of interest to 
his constituency. His modesty is betokened by the following excerpt : 

I am persuaded that he rules best who best knows how to serve. 

For the second time, it is my high privilege to give account of your 
affairs intrusted to my care, and report my official transactions for in- 
spection, that the tares may be separated from the grain, and only that 
which is right may prevail. 

In all of the matters will be found the light as it has at the time 
shone to me ; and rest assured, brethren, that though the understanding 
may have been moderate, the skill insufficient for the importance of the 
work, and the record filled with mistakes, my own conscience approves 
that in everything no selfish motive has prompted, but that my concep- 
tion of what appeared to be my duty under the circumstances, has pre- 
vailed, and I have tried to foster every interest of my brethren. Where- 
ever it has been my privilege to meet the brethren, I have been impressed 
with the apparent high character of those who are working and teaching 
our professions, and encouraged to see that these professions are being 
practiced by them, and with pride I am constrained to say that it is a 
mark of distinction that usually indicates a good man, to be designated 
as a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Officially, it has been to me a great pleasure, that the brethren, upon 
almost every occasion and issue that has arisen, exhibited to so marked 
a degree that brotherly tolerance for the speech, acts and opinions of 
each other, and which has made possible so much good feeling and har- 
mony among them, during the past year. 

He reports that five new lodges were constituted and that thirteen 
lodges U.D. were instituted. 

He made and reported sixty-three decisions, ranging all the way from 
the custody of the key to the lodge room to the wearing of Masonic 
emblems by a Mason's widow, but says of some of them that they were 
"simply reported as official transactions." 

We quote No. 37 of the series because it shows the antithesis of the 
Illinois law on the subject: 

That the consent required in waiving jurisdiction of a lodge as to 
Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts must be expressed by secrel 
ballot; otherwise the free expression of objection to advancement might 
be restrained, or the objector divulged to the brethren. 



76 APPENDIX PART I. 



We reproduce the following from the conclusion of the grand mas- 
ter's address : 

Compared with former years, the past year, officially, has been a very 
busy one, continuously filled with matters of importance, sufficient to 
have taxed the time and ability of the most competent. 

In common with many of the brethren, whose zeal for our institution 
has been tried and proved in many activities, my time has been freely 
and lovingly given, and whatever of ability was my portion, used for the 
interests of our noble craft. 

Appreciation of the many honors and privileges conferred upon mc 
by this grand lodge makes my feeble utterances entirely inadequate to 
express my feelings upon this occasion ; but, as I reflect upon the situa- 
tion — my brethren gathered around me in this annual home-coming, 
made up of the representative men from each community, and who are 
making the history of our fair state, in this new temple, this new home, 
of that fraternity which, in practical life, has ever spoken, and is now 
speaking, its encouraging words of good cheer to the struggling man of 
today; that holds out to the world its ever luminous example of breth- 
ren living in unity and brotherly love ; that teaches to him who seeks, 
the highest type of moral citizenship; that holds up its ever-shining 
light of happiness and hope against the darkness of superstition, preju- 
dice and ignorance; — the desire to think of self is lost, and in the re- 
flected glory of this great Masonic pageant it is enough that I have been 
permitted to be one of the many who have had opportunity to be counted 
among those who love its privileges. 

At the evening session Past Grand Master Zeigler of the Grand 
Lodge of Washington was officially received. We wonder how "Louie" 
happened to be so far from home — and whether he had an opportunity 
to inculcate his favorite first lesson in German, "Was wilst du habenf" 
At this session the E. A. degree was conferred on an actual candidate 
for a local lodge, by the grand lodge committee on work. 

The report on correspondence is from the skilled and practiced hand 
of Past Grand Master S. B. Wright, whose 135 pages of carefully se- 
lected and gracefully written original matter make the reader wish he 
were not restricted for space. To a charming style, he adds the strength 
which comes from knowledge and thought and the courage to speak his 
mind when he differs from his co-laborers. In the four pages which he 
gives to Illinois he shows that he has carefully read the record of our 
meeting of 1908, and noted the action taken. He refers to the reception 
accorded to R.W. Bro. Hempstead, the new poet laureate, mentions the 
work done by our Home board and notes the fact that the question of 
recognizing the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico was referred to a special 
committee to report the following year. Anent this he says : 

This will bring up the question of the recognition of grand lodges 
formed by lodges who were first chartered by A. & A. S. R. bodies, 
against which Bro. Robbins is so bitterly opposed. The reference of the 
resolution of a special committee is a direct effort to pass it over his 
head and we shall watch the result with special interest. Bro. Robbins 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 



was appointed chairman of the committee, the mover of the resolution, 
M.W. Bro. Geo. M. Moulton, being also a member. 

We will say for the information of Bro. Wright and others who may 
be interested, that the preparation of the report of this special commit- 
tee was almost the last Masonic work done by Bro. Robbins, being fin- 
ished after he was no longer able to leave his bed. 

We append the following quotation from Bro. Wright's review of 
Bro. Robbins' work: 

The correspondence report is by M.W. Bro. Robbins and is interest- 
ing from start to finish. He never desists from hitting the head of the 
A. & A. S. R. whenever and wherever found. He seems so unreasonable 
in his statements, and his premises are so twisted from those of the 
majority of the best Masonic writers that we cannot feel other than that 
he is unreasonably prejudiced. He and Bro. Jenks, of Wisconsin, are 
of a class almost by themselves. 

Perhaps we will be permitted to remark quietly in this connection 
that the first or highest class is usually rather small, and to express the 
hope (we had almost said belief) that if Bro. Wright will give the 
same thoughtful study and discrimination to the question of what consti- 
tutes the right to dominate in the affairs of Ancient Craft Masonry 
that he has given to other subjects he will become a member of the class. 
Read again what Bro. Robbins has so ably written on this subject, start- 
ing in not with the idea that he was prejudiced but that he was con- 
scientiously striving to present the facts, and conversion to the views 
he advocated will surely follow because historically, logically and Ma- 
sonically his argument is convincing and unanswerable — and to it we 
here attempt no addition. 

We regret that Brother Wright could not find space to give us at 
least a summary of the statistics he has been at the trouble and expense 
to collect, on the subject of lodge attendance on church services, and 
which he refers to as valuable and interesting. 

On the subject of original jurisdiction by a grand lodge in cases of 
discipline, Brother Wright says : 

Brother Robbins opposes the claim by grand lodges of original juris- 
diction insisting that they only have appellate jurisdiction. In Florida 
we have claimed and exercised "original jurisdiction'' for over seventy- 
five years, although the writer is not entirely satisfied that our grand 
lodge is correct in its claim. 

This indicates a mind open to conviction and justifies the hope ex- 
pressed supra, that Brother Wright will yet see a new light, on the 
subject of high-rite. 

Louis C. Massey, Orlando, grand master; Wieber P. Webster. Jack- 
sonville, grand secretary. 



78 APPENDIX PART I. 



GEORGIA, igo8. 

122nd Annual. Macon. October 28. 

The grand lodge was opened in ample form, Most Worshipful 
Thomas H. Jeffries, grand master, presiding. Prayer was offered by 
B. F. Thurman, grand chaplain. 

There were present two past grand masters, three past deputy grand 
masters and a past grand treasurer — also the envoys from fifty-five other 
grand lodges, including Thomas J. Carling, representative from Illinois. 
Ten of the eleven district deputies were in attendance. At roll call 517 
delegates representing lodges, and 400 past masters not representing 
lodges, responded. The reverent eloquence of the grand master's address 
is evidenced by the following extracts : 

We, again, are permitted to surround the sacred altar, our tongues 
attuned to the melody of peace, our souls inspired with emotions of love, 
our hearts overflowing with filial gratitude, while ascriptions of adoration 
and praise fill this holy house; I would paraphrase and adopt the prayer 
of Nehemiah, "O Lord, I beseech Thee, let now Thine ear be attentive 
to the prayer of Thy servant, and to the prayer of Thy servants, who 
desire to fear Thy name ; and prosper, I pray Thee, Thy servant this day, 
and grant him grace in the sight of these men." 

***** 

As Masons, we seek that higher light. With our faces turned toward 

the eternal source of light, with hope in humanity and faith in Almighty 

God, we climb the "toilsome steep" until our feet are firmly set upon 

the regal heights of the mountain of knowledge. For Masonry, there 

are no "valleys of the shadows," the ascent is ever upward and onward 

and the shadows fall only upon the faint-hearted and the slothful, upon 

him who, forgetful of time and careless of opportunity, loiters by the 

wayside to enjoy some idle pleasures. "Excelsior" is the battle cry of 

Masonry. 

***** 

A glorious brotherhood, whose foundation is faith and trust in Al- 
mighty God. Recognizing His eternal Fatherhood, it becomes the royal 
house of the King of Heaven, every brother a royal Prince, through 
whose veins courses the purple blood of his Divine lineage. Matchless 
Masonry, with her immortal tenets of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, 
is like celestial wisdom. 

The grand master pays a loving tribute to the memory of R.W. Bro. 
J. H. Estill, past junior grand warden, for whose funeral an occasional 
communication of the grand lodge was convened. 

Dispensations were issued to institute ten new lodges, twenty-five 
lodges that had received charters at the previous annual meeting were 
constituted and nine corner-stones were placed. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 79 

Notwithstanding his earnest protest against the too prevalent prac- 
tice of granting dispensations to confer degrees out of time, the grand 
master reports the issue of 135 miscellaneous dispensations, including a 
large number of untimely degrees, removals of place of meeting, etc. 
From the record we conclude that a Georgia lodge must procure a dis- 
pensation before removing into a new hall even when no jurisdictional 
rights are involved. When Georgia adopts the Illinois schedule of fees 
for dispensations to authorize "hurry-up" degrees, the grand master's 
labors in that direction will doubtless decrease. 

Of the decisons reported by the grand master we copy No. 3 only, 
as follows : 

3. I have been asked if a Mason can engage in the sale of "near beer." 

"Near beer" being a relative term, and not being familiar with the 
constituency of "near beer," I decided : 

No Mason may lawfully engage in the sale or barter, for valuable 
consideration, either directly or indirectly, or give 1 away to induce trade 
at any place of business, or keep or furnish at any other public places, or 
manufacture, or keep on hand at his place of business, any alcoholic, 
spirituous, malt or intoxicating liquors or intoxicating bitters or other 
drinks, which, if drunk to excess, or if drunk at all, will produce intoxi- 
cation. Provided this shall not apply to licensed druggists selling for 
medical or scientific purposes only, as provided by the laws of the state 
of Georgia. 

This is an excellent illustration of how "near" a grand lodge may 
come to the ridiculous when it undertakes to fix by definite limitations 
the vocation of its petitioners and members. Let us have "good men and 
true" and let us rely upon the intelligence and conscience of our mem- 
bership to judge truly and justly of the individual character and worthi- 
ness in each case as it arises. It is not the vocation of a man, but his 
conduct that should determine the status. 

The grand master's address closes with the following poem, by Bro. 
Rudyard Kipling : 

i/envoi. 

When earth's last picture is painted, and the tubes are twisted and dried, 
When the oldest colours have faded, and the youngest critic has died, 
We shall rest, and, faith, we shall need it — lie down for an aeon or two, 
Till the Master of all good workmen shall set us to work anew ! 

And those that were good shall be happy; they shall sit in a golden chair; 
They shall splash at a ten-league canvas with brushes of comet's hair ; 
They shall find real saints to draw from — Magdalene. Peter, and Paul ; 
They shall work for an age at a sitting and never be tired at all ! 

And only the Master shall praise us, and only the Master shall blame; 
And no one shall work for money, and no one shall work for fame ; 
But each for the joy of the working, and each in his separate star. 
Shall draw the thing as he sees it. for the God of Things as They Arc! 



80 APPENDIX PART I. 



District deputies for the eleven districts were elected by the represent- 
atives of the respective districts and their election was approved by the 
grand lodge. By the adoption of a report from the committee on gen- 
eral welfare, these deputies were divided into three classes, elected for 
one, two and three years, respectively, and thereafter for three-year 
terms. Among the duties relegated to the Georgia deputies appears to 
be that of promulgating the work of the jurisdiction. 

From the report of the trustees of Masonic Home we clip the fol- 
lowing : 

Cost of maintenances of eight state Homes as follows : 

New York, per capita. $212 23 

Ohio, per capita 188 54 

Michigan, per capita 294 99 

New Jersey, per capita 226 07 

Nebraska, per capita 189 97 

Illinois, per capita 194 80 

Missouri, per capita 245 00 

Connecticut, per capita 166 54 

Total, divided by eight $1,718 14 

Average cost per capita $ 214 77 

Georgia Home average inmates, 30. 
Average cost per capita $ 211 90 

The number of lodges at close of session 546, a gain of sixteen over 
previous year. Number of members 30,056, a gain of 1,636. 

The report on correspondence (142 pp.) is the eighth from the pen 
of Bro. A. Q. Moody, who reviews the Illinois session of 1907, the last 
year of Brother Allen's administration, from whose report which he 
characterizes as encouraging he extracts a paragraph. He refers to 
Brother Robbins' report on correspondence as "a valuable document, 
intensely interesting from a Masonic standpoint and full of information." 

Thomas H. Jeffries, Atlanta, re-elected grand master; W. A. Wou- 
hin, Macon, re-elected grand secretary. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 81 

IDAHO, 1908. 

41st Annual. Boise. September 8. 

The pleasant features in half-tone of Grand Master William R. 
Hamilton greet us from the fly-leaf of the proceedings. Then comes 
the record of a special communication of the grand lodge convened for 
the purpose of laying the corner-stone of the new city hall at Cceur 
d'Alene, May 9, 1908. The forty-first annual communication was opened 
at Boise, September 8, 1908, by William C. Whitwell, grand master, 
and his associate grand officers. There were present six past grand 
masters, one past senior grand warden, three past junior grand wardens, 
twenty-four past masters and the representatives of thirty-eight char- 
tered lodges and two lodges 'under dispensation. The presence of eighteen 
diplomats is recorded, not including the Illinois representative, Bro. 
Stephen Dempsey. 

From the grand master's business-like address we clip the following: 
In my travels over the state I have been particularly gratified to see 
so many young men entering the Masonic fraternity. The pure prin- 
ples as taught and practiced by our ancient and honorable order will 
greatly aid in purifying, elevating and ennobling the lives of all men ; 
but the young men coming into the Masonic fraternity will receive a 
special blessing, for in them will be instilled and developed a veneration 
and love for the Deity and His sacred word, which will greatly strengthen 
their faith, and guide them safely through life's journey in the paths of 
righteousness. 

From the reports of various lodges it appears that our membership 
has reached 2,595, a net gain of 200. The steadily increasing numbers 
is a source of satisfaction, and the stronger we become the greater is 
our responsibility. 

He notes the passing of M.W. Bro. Frank E. Ensign, past grand 
master, who was elected to the Grand East in 1881 — and of forty-six 
other faithful brethren of the jurisdiction, and refers to the demise of 
R.W. Bro. Gilbert W. Barnard, of Illinois. He records the making of 
twenty official visitations and the issuance of seven dispensations, among 
them two for the formation of new lodges. He recommended that a 
cipher key to the work be given to the grand master and to the wardens 
and senior deacon of each lodge. The committee on jurisprudence (the 
grand lodge concurring) acquiesced in this so far as concerned the 
grand master, but turned the wardens and deacons down cold save for 
such pickings as they might obtain at "reasonable times'' from the mas- 
ter's copy. If there must be a "fence" it is well to have its exact height 



82 APPENDIX PART I. 



definitely fixed. It is better, however, to deal in none but honest goods 
upon which profane and stealthy hands cannot be placed. 

The grand master decided (inter alia) that it is contrary to the 
teaching of Masonry and to the sacredness and secrecy of the ballot to 
instruct a brother to cast the vote of the lodge for a certain named 
brother for an office. The committee and the grand lodge sustained 
this doctrine. If inexperienced brethren would pay more attention to 
Masonic principles and practices and less to political methods and 
caucuses, we should not find this attempt to copy partisan devices and 
gag-rule measures hopping up in lodges so often. 

The grand secretary's report shows a total membership of 2,595, a 
gain of 200 during the year. 

The report on correspondence (125 pp.) is from the pen of the vet- 
eran reviewer, George E. Knepper, who gives over three of his pages to 
Illinois, showing a careful and discriminating reading of our proceed- 
ings of 1907, though he makes one mistake that will amuse our good 
brother Spencer, who is given credit for the oration, "said to be an 
excellent one," delivered, though not furnished for print, by Rev. Rufus 
A. White. Brother Spencer was guilty of nothing worse than moving 
a vote of thanks and requesting a copy of the oration for publication. 
Brother Knepper makes several brief extracts from the report of Brother 
Robbins, showing that he knows a good thing when he sees it and that 
he still retains the school teacher's appreciation of honest work which 
he exhibited in Illinois many years ago. 

William R. Hamilton, Silver City, grand master; Theophilus W. 
Randall, Boise, grand secretary. 



INDIANA, 1909. 

88th Annual. Indianapolis. May 25. 

This volume opens with a report of the special meeting of the grand 
lodge held on Monday, May 24, the day preceding the date of annual 
meeting, for the purpose of dedicating the new and beautiful Masonic 
Temple, a handsome cut of which adorns the fly-leaf. The ceremonies oc- 
curred in the afternoon and were prolonged into the evening. In addi- 
tion to the ritualistic observances the time permitted a deal of oratory 
sufficient to fill nearly forty pages of the report. M.W. Bro. Isaac P. 
Leyden, past grand master and grand lodge trustee, in behalf of the 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 83 

trustees and building committee presented the result of their labors to 
the Grand Master, M.W. Bro. Charles N. Mikels. 

Bro. Mikel's address took the form of an imaginary invitation to King 
Solomon, our first most excellent grand master, to be the guest of the 
day, and he reported the conversation supposed to have occurred in their 
joint inspection of the building, thus permitting the introduction of the 
names of many of the brethren who were prominent in planning and con- 
structing the temple and the details of the work done. We give space 
to the following extracts selected almost at random, from this very in- 
teresting interview, in which King Solomon is represented as seeking, 
and the grand master as furnishing the desired information:- 

>!< 5JC $Z >|S H 5 * 

"Who are the members of your building committee, who have been 
paralleling my own famous building committee — my friend, Hiram, King 
of Tyre, and my beloved brother, Hiram Abiff? I have looked on every 
hand for, at least a tablet which shall tell in enduring brass that their 
names are worthy of standing out boldly before all who may enter this 
temple as master builders. 

"Who is the architect of this temple? From whose heart and head 
were quarried those massive and appropriate pillars on the outer wall, 
which lean out over the spectator like the outspread fingers of the hands 
of a god, a perpetual, imperative command in stone, saying, 'Hush. Be 
still as you look.' " 

We answer : The fullness of time is not here. Wait until tomorrow. 
Their brethren of the grand lodge will reward Leyden, Emery, Hollo- 
way, Cravens, Gavin, and their secretary, Prather ; Jacoby, Mayer and 
Wynne, Hunter and Rubush, with a chaplet of sincere appreciation and 
fix their place among the master builders of the Masonic world. 

****** 

"Where is that regal veteran of half a century's earnest service, Martin 
H. Rice? Where is that sweet-spirited comrade of many a quiet council, 
Simeon Stevens Johnson? Where are the seven hundred and forty-seven 
of your brethren who have left your altars never to return, since you laid 
the corner stone of this building a year ago? I weep for them and I 
weep over my own dead and my own departed glory. 

"I am standing on the doorstep of your own glorious achievement, 
looking across the centuries to the hour of my own triumph. I am reach- 
ing for the inspiration of my own accomplished results, which gave me my 
place in history. Behold, that which I wrought so diligently in marble 
and brass and cedar and precious stone does not endure. My beautiful 
temple has crumbled into flower gardens where Plebrew maidens grow 
fragrance over the tomb of my greatness. 

"Not one who wrought with me then is with me now. I am alone, a 
stranger in a strange land and in a strange time. The time was when I 
called up my seventy thousand Entered Apprentices who toiled so faith- 
fully with me, and they answered my summons ; so did my eighty thou- 
sand Fellow Crafts, who worked so effectively in quarry and forest that 



84 APPENDIX PART I. 



neither a hammer or any tool of iron were heard or needed in the erec- 
tion of my temple ; so did my three thousand three hundred masters, or 
overseers of the work; so did my good right hand, my Hiram, King of 
Tyre, so did my left, my wizard of beauty, my Hiram Abiff, the widow's 
son. But not one of them is with me now." 

But I said to Solomon in his tears : Your self-consciousness has made 
you short sighted. Life is too short to think about yourself and your dis- 
appointments. Masonry is optimistic. Your temple was a pattern for 
other temples and the pattern has not been lost. This very temple which 
we are dedicating is your temple, and it is only one out of a thousand 
temples which are yours. 

Near the close of the Grand Master's address we find the following 
sample of Indiana eloquence : 

I want this temple to be filled, and shine with the refulgent splendor 
of the incandescent light of real 2,000-candle power brotherhood and the 
smiles of your faces. I want you to be active dynamos which generate an 
uninterrupted current of good fellowship. I want you to come here as a 
willing storage battery ready to be fully charged and go back home full 
of a vital power for good. 

I want the great Architect of the Universe to open up a new set of 
books with Indiana Masons; to get some thoroughly up-to-date adding 
machines with perpetual motion attachments. With selected heart-special- 
ists and speedy accountants, I want him to keep track of us, brethren, 
and announce to us some sweet day, who it is among us, who greets the 
largest number of his brethren with a smile of welcome; gives most heart- 
ily, the good right hand of Masonic loyalty ; utters the most kindly words 
of appreciation, and finally tells us who it is, who forgets himself most in 
thinking of his brethren oftenest. 

The other speech at the afternoon session was by Rev. Joshua Stan- 
field, from whose able address we quote only a brief paragraph : 

Away with the foolish cry that "Masonry is good enough church for 
me." It is no church at all, and never claims to be. It is the highest and 
noblest fraternal organization the world has yet known. Let us hold 
strenously and wisely to the dicta, "no union of church and state," "no 
union of Masonry and state." Let us ever remember that there are two 
institutions forever higher than Masonry — the family and the church. 

At the evening session there was a speech of welcome by Past Grand 
Master Frank E. Gavin and an address by Bro. Elias J. Jacoby. These 
talks were eloquent and inspiring and we find them so interesting that 
we are unable to make selections from those that would do them justice, 
and can only suggest to Illinois Masons that if they can possess them- 
selves of these orations it will pay to read them. 

On Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, one hour earlier than that fixed by 
the regulations for the opening of the grand lodge, there was a preliminary 
meeting at which after singing by the Masonic Quartette there were 
speeches by Bro. Robert J. Aley, past master of Monroe Lodge No. 22, 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 85 



on the Real Structure of Masonry and by Past Grand Master Lincoln 
V. Cravens, in which he gave many interesting details and statistics anent 
the construction of the temple. Both these addresses are well worth a 
careful reading. 

At the beginning of the record of the annual meeting, which opened 
at 10 o'clock A. M., Tuesday, May 25th, is an excellent half-tone of M. W. 
Bro. Wm. H. Marker, now grand master. Sixteen past grand masters 
were present and thirty-two members of the diplomatic corps, though 
Illinois was not represented. Grand Master Mikels in an able and well 
written address covering forty pages of the record, gives a full report 
of the transactions of the year, including many interesting items about 
the construction of the new temple and a review of the centennial cele- 
bration held at Vincennes, March 13, 1909. He says that "Illinois was 
represented by Charles Martin, grand lecturer," and he gives the names 
of several other brethren from neighboring states and remarks, "I wish 
that you could have heard these brethren as well as our own brethren." 
We join in the wish, for Wabash oratory is always up to high watermark. 

He reports the demise of Simeon S. Johnson, past grand master, and 
of Past Grand Master Martin H. Rice, grand treasurer, and includes 
in his list of deceased in other jurisdictions the name of Loyal L. Munn, 
our lamented past grand secretary. 

He authorized the removal of seven lodges and approved the by-laws 
submitted by twenty-four lodges. 

He also issued special dispensations for the election of officers in 
fourteen lodges. He reported eighteen decisions, all of which were ap- 
proved by the committee on jurisprudence and adopted by the grand 
lodge. We transcribe the 4th and 7th of these decisions, because they 
give in language somewhat different from the usual stereotype form what 
we understand to be the rule in Illinois upon the same subects. 

4. If an Indiana lodge has not authorized an expenditure of money 
on a member of its lodge who is in good standing, temporarily or perma- 
nently residing in some other grand jurisdiction, there is no legal Masonic 
obligation on the part of the Indiana lodge to pay such unauthorized 
expenditure. An Indiana lodge has no legal Masonic basis for pre- 
senting a bill to a lodge of another grand jurisdiction for a similar un- 
authorized expenditure made in Indiana by an Indiana lodge, for the 
benefit of a needv brother of another grand jurisdiction, who is tem- 
porarily or permanently within the jurisdiction of the Indiana lodge. There 
is a basis in fairness on which to present the matter of the expenditure 
and the necessities of the case to the lodge of the Mason assisted, in 
expectation that the lodge of the beneficiary will appreciate the assistance 
rendered to its member, by contributing as much as they can do reason- 
ably toward the liquidation of the expenditure, without ground for criti- 
cism because of inability to pay the whole bill. 



86 APPENDIX PART I. 



7. On funeral occasions, when the deceased belongs to the Masonic 
order and other orders, there is no legal objection to such other orders 
joining as such in the funeral procession, when the Masonic lodge is to 
perform the burial ceremony. There is nothing in Masonic law to pre- 
vent Masonic lodges from extending the common courtesies to other 
established and helpful orders. Masonic lodges do not turn out on funeral 
occasions unless requested to do so by the deceased in his lifetime, or by 
his family after death. Members of the order and their families are con- 
structively, if not actually, aware of the law of the order, and know that 
Masonic lodges cannot be called out except to bury the dead. The law 
of the order, which prohibits Masonic lodges from acting as escorts to 
other orders on funeral occasions, is not born of lack of courtesy to those 
orders, but grows out of the fact that there is no provision for a meeting 
on such occasions except for the purpose of performing the' burial service. 

Two duplicate charters were issued, one charter surrendered, one dis- 
pensation for a new lodge was granted, ten corner-stones were laid, 
thirteen lodges were officially visited, ?nd four halls were dedicated. 

Under the head of "The Nationalization of Free and Accepted 
Masons," the grand master quotes the invitation of the grand master of 
Pennsylvania to attend a conference of grand masters in Philadelphia for 
the purpose of consultation regarding the difference of construction given 
to some of the usages, customs and landmarks in the various jurisdictions, 
and makes it the text for a long, and in many respects trite, argument for 
the establishment of a general grand lodge. 

In this he goes far beyond anything which was probably in the mind 
of the grand master of Pennsylvania, when he sent out the invitation, 
and opens a subject at which older and more conservative members of 
the craft have shied for years, though frequently led up to it by inexperi- 
enced enthusiasts. 

Upon the recommendation of the committee to whom that part of the 
grand master's address was referred he was sent to Philadelphia to repre- 
sent Indiana in the conference named, and where the suggestion of the 
formation of a general grand lodge was received with scant favor. 

From the report of the grand secretary we learn that at the beginning 
of the year there were 534 lodges in the state, that one new lodge was 
chartered and one charter surrendered, leaving the number of lodges 'the 
same as the previous year. 

The net increase in membership in 1908 was 2,404, and the total mem- 
bership Jan. 1, 1909, 52,515. 

The trustees of the temple association reported receipts, including 
balance from previous year, of $316,027.02 and expenditures, principally 
on account of temple construct'on, of $308,761.57 and a balance May 25, 
1909, of $7,265.45. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 87 



The legatees of Past Grand Master Martin H. Rice presented to the 
grand lodge his Masonic library, which was gratefully accepted by the 
grand lodge and suitably acknowledged by a special committee. 

Upon the recommendation of the committee on foreign correspondence 
the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma was accorded full recognition, and the 
report of same committee answering a question referred to it was adopted, 
as follows : 

May an Entered Apprentice of one lodge be granted permission to 
visit another lodge which is open and at work on the Entered Apprentice 
degree? 

Your committee agrees with the grand master that there is much con- 
fusion now existing upon this question among the lodges of Indiana and 
that there ought to be uniformity of practice in relation thereto, and we 
unanimously report that, in our opinion, any Entered Apprentice of one 
lodge is, and of right ought to be, entitled to visit another lodge open 
and at work on the Entered Apprentice degree. 

The report on Masonic correspondence, or as it is here designated the 
Indiana Annual Masonic Review, is by Past Grand Master Daniel 
McDonald, who gives to Illinois seven and one-half of his two hundred 
and twelve pages. 

He gives a resume of Grand Master Bell's address at our annual of 
1908, showing careful reading of same, and says of his views regarding 
church attendance by lodges as such, that they are so nearly in accord with 
his own that he quotes them in full. He refers to the oration of Grand 
Orator Beach, as a polished production. He quotes with approba- 
tion several items from the report of Bro. Robbins on correspondence 
and says of his report: 

We thank our contemporary for his kindly notice of our efforts to pro- 
duce a readable review, and we can say "without the fear of successful 
contradiction" that his review is the most voluminous and interesting- 
document of the kind we have ever had the pleasure of perusing. The 
complete index accompanying the report is one of the most interesting 
features connected with it. 

William H. Marker, grand master, Tipton ; Calvin W. Prather. 
grand secretary, Indianapolis. 



88 APPENDIX PART I. 



INDIAN TERRITORY, 1908. 

35th Annual. McAlester, Ok. August 11. 

A vignette of M.W. Bro. James Boyd Morrow adorns the first page 
of the proceedings, and this is followed by a brief biographical sketch 
showing that he was made a Mason in 1894 and was appointed senior 
grand deacon in 1903. 

Thereafter appear the records of two emergent communications of 
the grand lodge, one at Tulsa, Ok., October 26, 1907, for the purpose 
of conducting the funeral of Bro. John Dileon Seamon, a member of 
Tulsa Lodge No. 65, and the other at Coweta, November 1, 1907, to lay 
the corner-stone of the Presbyterian church, at both of which Grand 
Master R. W. Choate presided and opened the grand lodge in ample 
form on the third degree. 

The annual meeting convened at McAlester, Choctaw Nation, Okla- 
homa, August 11, 1908, Grand Master James Boyd Morrow in the chair. 
The report of the committee on credentials showed the presence of the 
full line of grand officers, twelve past grand masters, four district dep- 
uty grand masters, thirty-eight past masters, 174 representatives of 
chartered lodges, and twelve from lodges U.D. 

In the grand master's address, after reciting the ancient legend of 
Hafaz, the Egyptian, which teaches the lesson that "Truth leads to 
joy in the hereafter," he gives a summary of the year's work including 
dispensations, decisions, etc., mostly of local application. The item of 
most general interest is that pertaining to the steps looking towards the 
consolidation of the Grand Lodges of Indian Territory and Oklahoma, 
made advisable if not practically compulsory by the political union of 
the two territories. 

The following extract from the report of the committee on consoli- 
dation contains a resume of the progress made and the committee's 
suggestion as to proposed action, and this was probably carried out in 
substance at the February meeting, though we have no official report 
of that meeting at hand as yet : 

We, your committee to whom was referred the matter of merging the 
Grand Lodge of Indian Territory and the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma 
Territory, and that were appointed to meet the grand master of the 
Grand Lodge of Oklahoma Territory and his delegation, who are here 
to confer with us on this important question, beg leave to submit the 
following for your consideration : 

That we have met with the grand master of the Grand Lodge of 
Oklahoma and his delegation and have thoroughly discussed with them 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 89 



the question of a merger of the two grand bodies, and that we are of 
the opinon and belief that such merger should be had upon the follow- 
ing basis and lines : 

That the grand lodge formed as a result of such merger should be 
called "The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the 
State of Oklahoma," and that it should be incorporated under the laws 
of the State of Oklahoma by and under said name. 

That in order to bring about this result a communication of the 
Grand Lodge of Indian Territory should be called to meet on the second 
Tuesday of February, A. D. 1908, at the same time of the next annual 
communication of the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma Territory, to be held 
at such place as this grand lodge shall determine. 

That at said communications each of said grand lodges shall transact 
such business as shall come before them, and pass an ordinance vesting 
its jurisdiction in said Grand Lodge of the State of Oklahoma, when 
said grand lodge shall be organized. 

That both of said grand lodges shall then meet in convention in the 
city of Guthrie, Oklahoma, for the purpose of merging into the Grand 
Lodge of the State of Oklahoma by adopting a constitution and by-laws 
and electing its grand officers. 

That in organizing the Grand Lodge of the State of Oklahoma the 
officers, both elective and appointive, shall alternate, according to rank, 
between the present jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of the Indian Ter- 
ritory and the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma Territory. 

That said convention shall be composed of the members of the Grand 
Lodge of Indian Territory present at said communication, and the mem- 
bers of the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma Territory present at said com- 
munication, the representatives in said convention having the same vote, 
voice and rights that they had in their respective grand lodges. 

That the past grand officers of the two present grand jurisdictions 
shall be past grand officers of the Grand Lodge of the State of Okla- 
homa, with like privileges and honors as they now enjoy in their re- 
spective jurisdictions. 

That the present elective officers of each grand lodge and the past 
masters in each grand jurisdiction shall be members of the Grand Lodge 
of the State of Oklahoma. 

That each of the present grand jurisdictions shall retain their present 
esoteric work, and a grand lecturer in each jurisdiction to disseminate 
the same, until the Grand Lodge of the State of Oklahoma provides 
otherwise. 

That the subordinate lodges in each grand jurisdiction shall retain 
their present charters, as a matter of history, and new charters shall be 
issued by the Grand Lodge of the State of Oklahoma, which new char- 
ters shall recite the facts which necessitated the issuing of the same. 

We give place to a few paragraphs from the oration of Rio. WlLLIAM 
Henry Talmage, because they express a sentiment well worthy oi be- 
ing proclaimed from the house-tops : 

Masonic "work" is not simple money gelling. Anything hut that. 



90 APPENDIX PART I. 



A poor, unreasoning dog, tied to a tread-mill, tongue lolling out, 
running the while, yet arriving nowhere, released at last by the hand of 
the housewife, who finds the butter churned, passes a day of nobler toil 
than the reasoning man who races the tread-mill of life with no loftier 
ideal in his heart than that of adding a few more dollars to his pile. 

Besides this, money does not always support us in the best sense, nor 
support those dependent upon us. The upright, useful life of a father 
may be far greater wealth to a boy than an inheritance of money alone. 

The memory of a loving, virtuous, hard-working mother or father has 
done more to keep in those paths that lead to greatness the feet of 
America's boys and girls than the wealth of the nation. And yet too 
often do we allow ourselves to place a greater value on the dollar than 
upon worth of character. Money you may acquire at times with little 
or no effort, but character never. Only by honest, patient labor can a 
life be wrought that will be a force and inspiration sufficiently noble to 
influence others by its beauty. Such a character may have a thousand 
manifestations. It may be fostered by the youth or the aged. And its 
achievement should always be in the mind of the Mason who would 
truly do work pleasing to the Omnipotent One. 

There is a report on correspondence (180 pp.), the sixth from Bro 
T. C. Humphrey, but Illinois does not find a place therein. 

Henry Lowndes Muldrow, Tishomingo, grand master ; Joseph Sam- 
uel Murrow, Atoka, grand secretary. 



IOWA, 1909. 

66th Annual. Davenport. June 1. 

We have learned to expect good material and workmanship when we 
take up the printed record of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of 
Iowa, and this year's volume forms no exception to the rule. The cover 
page bears a cut of the fine library building at Cedar Rapids, which is 
labeled "The Only Masonic Library Building in the World." The fly- 
leaf has a good half-tone of M.W. Bro. P. J. Martin, grand master, and 
there are also half-tones of William Boyd Allison, honorary senior 
grand warden 1888, and Cyrus Haskel Shaw, senior grand warden 
1875-6. The record is further illustrated by vignettes of David W. Clem- 
ents, elected grand master at the session under review, and of William 
Hutchinson, deputy grand master, Hugh William Hughes, senior 
grand warden, Charles D. Becker, junior grand warden, and Charles 
Edward Nary, grand treasurer. As they all have faces pleasant to look 
upon, the volume lacks nothing by way of illustration. There is also a 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 91 

brief biographical sketch of each of the five above named grand officers. 
Previous to the formal opening of the grand lodge, the grand and past 
grand officers and members of the grand lodge assembled at the head- 
quarters hotel and led by the grand marshal marched to the grand opera 
house, where an address of welcome was given by the mayor of Daven- 
port in behalf of the city and by an eloquent brother in behalf of the 
local lodges. To these, by request of the grand master, the deputy grand 
master, Bro. J. W. Barry, made response "in a happy manner, inter- 
spersing his talk with interesting stories, saying among other things :" 
Most Worshipful Grand Master, Ladies and Brethren of Davenport: 

As I sat listening to the addresses by the speakers who have pre- 
ceded me, I thought, when the first "gun" was fired, "What shall I 
say?" But when the second reported, I wished "I was seven blocks 
away." 

The Masons of Iowa deeply appreciate the welcome we have re- 
ceived, and they vie with Davenport citizens in all that has been said 
about this city, as they know its beauty and its character, and are proud 
to know that Davenport belongs, not to the people of Davenport, but to 
the great state of Iowa. 

Your city is famed for its hospitality. Fifty years ago on June 7, 
the Grand Lodge of Iowa came to Davenport for the first time to hold 
its annual communication. At that time Brother Hartsock was grand 
master, and he congratulated Masonry on what it had accomplished in 
Iowa. He stated that there were then 147 lodges in Iowa, with a mem- 
bership of 4,000. That was the first time the grand lodge came to Dav- 
enport, and this makes fourteen times that it has come here since. No 
other city in Iowa has welcomed the grand lodge as often as Davenport. 
It has met in twenty-one cities in the state since its organization, but 
the record of Des Moines, with ten communications, is nearest to that 
set by Davenport. Now the grand lodge gathers in this city again with 
over 500 lodges in the state, and with a membership of 40,000. Not only 
this, but there is now in the state an Eastern Star with a membership 
of 28,000 of the noblest women in all the world, and with its chief offi- 
cer, Mrs. Bessie M. Bills, residing in this city. So we can take you 
brethren in Davenport by the hand and rejoice with you that the ensign 
of our order hangs high. Mayor Scotf has given us as hearty a welcome 
as a Mason could wish. For us you have plugged up the hour glass, 
have removed the hands from the dial of time, and have given us a 
"Fidlar" that we may have a merry time, and furnished us with a "Block" 
system that we may go on our way more free from danger. For all 
this I thank you, but it expresses but little of the appreciation that we 
feel. 

At the conclusion of the public exercises the grand master requested 
all not members of the fraternity to withdraw, and the sixty-sixth annual 
communication of the Grand Lodge of Iowa was opened in ample form 
on the third degree, at Turner grand opera house, Davenport. June 1. 
1009. At roll call the elective and appointive officers responded, also. 
eleven past grand masters, six past senior grand wardens, seven past 
junior grand wardens, and nine past grand treasurers. 



92 APPENDIX PART I. 



There were no diplomats present, because as stated in the grand mas- 
ter's address the custom of having such representatives "has fallen into 
disuse in Iowa." The grand master suggested the consideration of the 
question of reviving the practice and the subject was referred to a spe- 
cial committee to report next year. 

After calling the deputy grand master to the chair the grand master 
proceeded with his address, which opened with these good words : 

With a due sense of the responsibilities entrusted to me as your 
grand master during the past year, I will endeavor to render you an ac- 
counting of my stewardship. 

It has been my aim to preserve intact the landmarks of Freemasonry, 
to maintain the usages and customs of the craft, and allow nothing to 
mar the peace and harmony that has prevailed in this jurisdiction for so 
many, many years. Realizing that Freemasonry is a law unto itself, that 
it imperatively requires that all other organizations be of secondary con- 
sideration, that its virtues, principles, security, and perpetuity depend upon 
its isolation from the profane and the shifting ideas of change and re- 
form, it has been my purpose to carry out the will of this grand lodge 
impartially, and in accordance with our established law. The Grand 
Lodge of Iowa meets in its sixty-sixth annual communication to 
plant one more golden milestone in its triumphant march along the 
pathway of human liberty. No assemblage of men, whether ecclesi- 
astical, civic, or fraternal, ever had greater cause to be proud of the 
principles for which they stand, or have greater reason to glory in the 
universality of the truths they promulgated than have we. Centuries of 
honorable history and progress are behind us. History that proclaims 
to the world our unselfish devotion to duty in the uplifting and the bet- 
terment of mankind. Among all the institutions known to man at the 
present day Freemasonry and the great school back of it are the only 
ones that undertake with clear intelligence to define man's duty to him- 
self and to his fellowmen, and to point out the lines of self-perfection, 
liberation, and higher evolution by an exact ethical formula, free from 
all dogmatism, superstititon, fear, or any ulterior motive whatsoever. 
Freemasonry thus stands as the epitome of human wisdom and of man's 
highest achievement to the present time. 

He reported that five new lodges chartered at the previous grand 
communication had been constituted and that dispensations had been is- 
sued to institute several new lodges. 

On the subject of smoking in lodge rooms he gave forth no uncer- 
tain sound, in the following: 

The growing inclination of men to smoke at all times and places has 
resulted in the members of some of our /lodges insisting that they have 
the right to smoke in the lodge room. Such a man would demand the 
right to smoke in church, should he attend one, no matter how offensive 
it might be to others. No Mason who has the true spirit of fraternity in 
his heart will have the desire to smoke or perform any other act in the 
lodge room that will offend any brother or tend to debase or degrade 
this noble order. Only a few of our lodges permit it, and in these the 
practice should be stopped. Smoking in the lodge room is an offense 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 93 



against common decency, a violation of the rules of good breeding, and 
should be made a Masonic offense. 

What he says about white and black balls is so aptly put that it is 
well worth repeating: 

There is no one thing that causes so much trouble in the lodges, so 
many disappointments to the members, as the wrong use of the black 
ball. To see a man we know is worthy and good denied admission to 
the fraternity for personal reasons or personal spite tests our confidence 
in human nature as we see the teachings and tenets of our order go un- 
heeded. Yet the black ball is necessary for our very existence, and any 
change in the law would be unwise. The absolute right to cast a secret 
ballot is one of our landmarks. So long as there creep into this fold 
men who are unworthy, who have become members for purely selfish 
motives, who have no conception of what real Masonry is, just so long 
will there be the wrong use of the black ball. If it were possible for 
this fraternity to eliminate selfishness and hatred from the minds of its 
members, it would have succeeded where all the philosophies and re- 
ligions of the world have failed. The only thing that we can do is to 
guard our portals well, see that no unworthy member is admitted, and, 
if possible, educate our members in the teachings and principles of genu- 
ine Masonry. Ask each member to compare the candidate with himself. 
Place himself and the candidate on the same level, and then in the white 
light of absolute justice decide whether he is as good a citizen and as 
upright a man as the candidate, and vote accordingly. When this is 
done there will be fewer black balls cast unjustly, but when a ballot 
has been had and a man above all reproach, who would have been an 
honor to the fraternity, has been rejected, it is better to lose the can- 
didate than to question the motives of a member at the risk of dissension 
or disruption. This fraternity or any lodge thereof is not dependent 
upon the admission of any one person or any one dozen persons into 
its ranks. Remember, brethren, that more real harm has been done the 
Masonic institution by the wrong use of the white ball than has by the 
wrong use of the black cube, but when a black ball is cast unjustly, it 
is better to leave it all to the silence which should follow the ballot and 
the offending member to his own conscience, for every member must 
answer under his obigation to God for the casting of every ballot, and 
as He knows out innermost thoughts, reliance may be placed in Him to 
punish those who vote from any but a pure motive. 

His remarks about "making ministers Masons free" are so in har- 
mony with our own views on the subject that we quote him in full: 

I do not admire the custom or approve the title applied by the usages 
of this jurisdiction which permits the degrees of Symbolic Masonry to 
be conferred upon ministers free of charge. It always looks humiliating 
to a minister and not creditable to a lodge. A minister who is a good 
man is justly entitled to all the courtesies extended to any other good 
man, and no more. True Masonry knows no creed except its own, 
and the idea some lodges have that it is really necessary for the minis- 
ters to join them in order to stand well in the community is entirely 
erroneous. The average minister enjoys more of the luxuries of life 
than the average member of our lodges, and they should pay the same 
price and enjoy the same privileges that other members do. When this 



94 APPENDIX PART I. 



is done, ministers will have a higher appreciation of the fraternity and 
become more active and useful members than they now are. 

The committee on jurisprudence did not concur in these views but 
favored the practice of granting free passes to ministers, and the grand 
lodge agreed with the committee. Nevertheless, we believe the grand 
master was right. There should be no class favorites in Masonry and 
ministers should not be pauperized. They are no better than all Masons 
ought to be, but are good enough to deserve such compensation for their 
work as will enable them to hold up their heads among men, and sup- 
port themselves and families without being subjected to special and hu- 
miliating concessions. 

From the grand master's decisions we copy three, which we have num- 
bered for convenience in reference : 

1. Can a lodge by by-law exempt a member who has paid dues for 
twenty or twenty-five years from further payment of local lodge dues? 

Answer. — No. He can only be excused from paying on account of 
actual inability to pay. 

2. Can a demitted Mason affiliate with a lodge outside of the one 
within whose jurisdiction he resides? 

Answer. — No. Not without a waiver of jurisdiction. 

3. Can a lodge ballot on a petition of a profane who removes perma- 
nently from its jurisdiction before he has been balloted on? 

Answer. — No. His removal makes him ineligible. After he has been 
elected he would belong to the lodge in which he had been elected, no 
matter where he moves to. 

No. 1 is in accord with Illinois law and usage, and was endorsed by 
the grand lodge. No. 2 was also approved with some modification to 
conform to a local law. It is contrary to Illinois law in whole and in 
part, and is, in our opinion, wrong in practice and subversive of that 
broad principle of fraternity which should pervade our institution. 

The vicinage should have the say when the question of fitness and 
character is to be determined, but when regularly made a brother, he 
should be free to elect where he prefers to affiliate. Subject always to 
the right of members to reject, object to or discipline him. 

No. 3 was approved by the committee and the grand lodge and ought 
to be good law everywhere. 

From the "suggestions" made by the grand master we are glad to 
oopy the following, only suggesting that he might well have said three 
degrees instead of first three degrees and degrees with higher numbers 
in place of higher degrees : 

There is a mistaken idea among many people, both Masons and pro- 
fanes, that a man is not much of a Mason who has only taken the first 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 



three degrees. So widespread is this idea that a seeker for Masonic 
degrees immediately inquires the cost of the higher degrees. It should 
be impressed upon the mind of every Entered Apprentice that it is not 
degrees that make a Mason, and whether a man's Masonic pedigree is 
three or thirty-three, he will never be much of a Mason until he em- 
bodies in his heart and soul the principles of genuine Symbolic Masonry. 

From a circular issued by the board of custodians it appears that 
provision was made for two or three ritualistic schools in each of the 
twenty-one districts of the state, thus affording convenient and abund- 
ant opportunity for acquiring the authorized work of the jurisdiction. 
In this connection we copy what the grand secretary says in his report, 
under the head of "Monitors" : 

We are frequently requested by brethren in and out of the state to 
furnish them with copy of an Iowa monitor. We beg to inform all that 
no such monitor has ever been issued to our knowledge. Our custodians 
speak well of both the Webb and Simons monitor, used, quite generally 
by our lodges, but no action of grand lodge prevents them from using 
any other they may wish. It might be well to give the subject of an 
Iowa monitor, book of ceremonies, and forms some consideration. 

We are of the opinon that it will be not only an aid but also an in- 
centive to uniformity of esoteric work if some standard of exoteric 
work is definitely fixed. 

We give place to the following from the grand secretary's report as 
a matter of general interest and not because we take much stock in 
written evidence : 

The Identification Card has come to stay., A large number of our 
grand lodges are using the same and find them very satisfactory. It 
has proven the most effective check to clandestine bodies ever tried. 
It has done more to secure prompt payment of dues than any other plan 
heretofore devised. The lodges are pleased with it and demand the 
cards. We do not approve the plan of asking each lodge to purchase 
these. The grand lodge should, by all means, furnish enough cards to 
enable the lodges to issue one to each member when yearly dues are paid, 
as is done in other jurisdictions. 

From statistics given by the grand secretary we learn that New York 
has 779 lodges with 152,928 members, Texas 764 lodges with 41,736 mem- 
bers, and Illinois 759 lodges with 85,583 members. These figures have 
been considerably changed since the publication of the reports from 
which he compiled his data, but no doubt Illinois is second only to New 
York in membership. There are many other interesting things in the 
grand secretary's very able and complete report which we would gladly 
give our readers, but time and space forbid. 

From the report of committee on grand master's address we clip the 
following : 

It must have been a very pleasant privilege to have been one of those 
present when the grand master of Ohio opened an occasional grand lodge 



96 APPENDIX PART I. 



and made the president-elect of the United States a Mason at sight. We 
are all interested in the story because the occurrence is so rare. We 
are glad that the ceremony can be pronounced lawful. But we are also 
glad that the occasional grand lodge is not frequently opened, and that 
our grand lodge has forbidden the grand master from exercising his 
prerogative in this particular. 

We can heartily join in the joy that comes of knowing that such oc- 
casions are rare, and in the wish that they may be rarer. If these are 
blessings and "blessings brighten as they take their flight," we can con- 
sole ourselves with the hope that memory will furnish all needed bless- 
ings in this line. 

From the report of the committee on chartered lodges it appears 
that the membership in 1909 is 41,504, an increase of 1,571" over the pre- 
vious year. 

A good way to get information is to ask questions and so we copy 
the following, which piques our curiosity and is a subject upon which we 
are seeking light : 

Bro. F. L. Bills, chairman of the committee on visitors, presented to 
the grand master and the brethren Bro. Louis Block, most excellent 
grand high priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Iowa, 
who was received as the presiding officer of a sister grand body with 
which we are in fraternal relation, and which body is recognized by our 
code of laws as having sole jurisdiction over all Royal Arch Masons 
in the state of Iowa. 

Bro. Louis Block spoke of the friendly relations which have existed 
and which he trusted would ever exist between the two respective grand 
bodies, that the Grand Lodge of Iowa, and of the Grand Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masonry over which he had the honor to preside. 

He assured the brethren that he appreciated the honor which had 
been extended and thanked them for the courtesy, and on behalf of the 
Royal Arch Masons of Iowa, he presented their most cordial greetings 
and wished the Grand Lodge of Iowa godspeed in the work in which it 
is engaged. 

Some of the queries we want to propound are : Where or how did 
the Ancient Craft Masons — the Master Masons of Symbolic Masonry 
of which the Grand Lodge of Iowa is made up — get the information 
which enabled them to recognize and receive in an official way the pre- 
siding officer of a body whose organism and control are completely dis- 
tinct from Craft Masonry? Why not as well receive the Grand Master 
of Odd Fellows, the Supreme Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias or 
the Potentate of the Shrine? 

In the statutes of the Grand Lodge of Illinois it is written, "No Ma- 
son can legally acquire the necessary information to vouch for another 
by sitting with him in any other body than a lodge of Ancient Craft 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 97 

Masons." This we believe to be sound doctrine and carried to its log- 
ical conclusion, it inevitably leads to the omission of all alleged recogni- 
tion of or official relations with any so-called higher aggregations. 

The report on correspondence (208 pp.) is from the pen of Bro. 
Louis Block, of Davenport, a new comer at the round table who intro- 
duces himself in what he calls a "Prologue," which, though written un- 
der circumstances differing "widely" from our own, still contains a 
number of points not unlike our own case, but hear what he says : 

The request of Grand Master Martin that we act as the committee 
on fraternal correspondence of the Grand Lodge of Iowa came to us 
with a shock of surprise, and we asked for time in which to collect 
our senses and give the matter due consideration. The recollection 
of the past master's degree conferred upon us some years hence was 
still fresh in our mind. We recalled that "fools rush in where angels 
fear to tread," and were possessed of a great fear of snapping off a 
larger portion than we could masticate. We felt that if we stayed in 
our old place on the committee on appeals and grievances we would be 
much less liable to grow long and fuzzy ears. That was a job we felt 
we knew something about, one that was more suited to our liking, one in 
which we were far less liable to make miserable mistakes. We felt we 
had been of some service to the grand lodge in effecting satisfactory set- 
tlements of several strenuous "scraps," and would not have found it 
out of the way to be asked to continue in that work. 

But to be called upon to take a seat in the company of the most 
potent, grave, and reverend seigneurs who grace the round table of 
Masonic correspondence, and who resent vigorously the intrusion of 
any new-hatched and untried comrade into their charmed circle — that — 
that was quite another matter. 

Yet, after all, what right had we to refuse? That would be telling 
the grand master that "he didn't know a horse when he saw one," and 
would be casting aspersions upon his judgment of men. 

Besides, we reflected that if the work that we might bring up from 
the quarries for inspection did not turn out a perfect ashlar, the grand 
master would have to share the blame with us. If he persisted in put- 
ting a monkey-wrench mechanic at work on the machine, 'twould be his 
fault if it didn't move gracefully down the road. We felt that if he 
could stand it we could. 

But the controlling consideration causing us to accept the appoint- 
ment was our realization of the opportunity it afforded us of venting 
in print some of our pet ideas. Here was a chance of riding our 
hobbies hard — a chance that might not come again — one we could not 
afford to lose. 

Wherefore, dearly beloved, we make three shakes at the round table 
blotter with the fountain pen in our own right hand, crave room in 
your circle, and permission to "sit in" the game. 

We shall need a little more room than that heretofore occupied by 
"Joe" Morcombe, "Charlie" Clark, or our genial and kindly Father Fel- 
lows, especially in view of the fact that some months since an irreverent 



98 APPENDIX PART I. 



and sacriligious brother, viewing our delicate Teutonic proportions, sa- 
luted' us with the title of ''Grand Wide Priest." 

In his seven-page notice of the Illinois proceedings of 1908, he com- 
pliments the printers on our neatly bound and finely printed record, and 
regrets the absence of a picture of Grand Master Bell. Just wait till 
you see the Proceedings of Illinois for 1909, and you will not only hear 
from, but also see our good Bell, whose shape is as seemly as his 
tones are clear. It is our custom to print the grand master's picture after 
he has done his work and we can say — "well done." 

Brother Block quotes from M.W. Bro. Bell's address anent the 
death of R.W. Bro. G. W. Barnard, whom he calls "one of Illinois 
most famous Masons." 

He gives in full Brother Bell's reasons for refusing a dispensation 
to attend church services, and says of them, "We feel that Brother 
Bell's decision is right and based upon the most sound and cogent 
reasoning." He also recommends Brother Bell's action in the matter of 
new lodges, and compliments his circular letter on the subject as follows: 

Grand Master Bell, it seems, had considerable trouble arising out of 
a failure on the part of his brethren to appreciate the principles which 
should control the formation of new lodges within the state ; but great 
good was in our opinion born of this trouble. For it caused the grand 
master to prepare a circular letter to the craft at large, in which he gave 
utterance to a most masterly and lucid enunciation of the principles 
which should guide and control Masons in the formation and establish- 
ment of new lodges. We have carefully studied this circular letter and 
are ready to give it our most hearty and unqualified endorsement. We 
believe that nothing but positive good and benefit could result to the 
craft at large if this letter were adopted and made use of by grand 
masters throughout the world in cases where the question as to the 
advisability of granting dispensation for a new lodge arises. At any 
rate, we feel that this letter cannot help but be of great assistance to 
every grand master, grand high priest, or grand commander who is 
called upon to consider the question of issuing a dispensation for the 
formation of a new subordinate body within his grand jurisdiction. 
The letter is too long to permit of its being inserted here, otherwise we 
should certainly include it in our report. Perhaps we shall later include 
the letter in our report as a valuable appendix. 

The letter appears in full in a separate appendix to his report. 

He speaks in fitting terms of commendation of the oration of Brother 
Beach, and gives a liberal extract therefrom. 

Of Brother Moulton's resol'ution to recognize the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico he says : 

An error appears in Brother Moulton's resolution when he writes 
that the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico has been recognized by Iowa. 
This is a mistake, for while Iowa has such recognition under considera- 
tion, she has as yet not granted it. 






MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 99 

However, recognition was granted at the Iowa session under review — 
upon recommendation of Brother Block, committee on correspondence, 
after he had written the above quoted report. So Brother Moulton 
only foretold what materialized later. 

Brother Block shows his appreciation of Brother Robbins' work as 
correspondent, though differing with him in some of his conclusions. 

We do not care in this place to take up these various points of dif- 
ference, though we have elsewhere in this report expressed our opinion 
of some of them — particularly with reference to the recognition of other 
bodies, whether called "co-ordinate," "co-operative," or any other name 
— and which have about as much connection with genuine Ancient Craft 
Masonry as the man in the moon has with sawing wood. Here's hoping 
to see you later, Brother Block. 

David W. Clements, West Union, grand master; Newton R. Par- 
vin, Cedar Rapids, grand secretary. 



IRELAND, 1908. 

180th Annual. Dublin. December 27. 

The Grand Lodge of Ireland, called by Brother Robbins "the most 
reticent of grand lodges," issues a little pamphlet of sixty pages called 
the "annual report," which contains all the information vouchsafed 
the fraternity regarding the business transacted the past year. The 
address of Deputy Grand Master Sir James Creed Meredith, LL.D., 
occupies more than half the volume. He mentions the deaths of the 
Earl of Drogheda, J.G.W. ; Sir John Banks, P.J.G.W. ; W. Power 
O'Donoghue, P.G.O. ; William M. Battersby, P.S.G.D., which had 
occurred during the year. 

Because of the historical data given we quote what he said in regard 
to a distinguished member of the grand lodge, Bro. Chetwode Crawley : 

I am sorry the grand treasurer is not with us today, because I would 
have liked in his presence to have told you something of distinguished 
Masonic bodies, which, apparently with an unanimity that was remark- 
able, in distant parts of the world, at almost the same time had selected 
the grand treasurer of the Grand Lodge of Ireland to be the recipient 
of honorary membership of their bodies. The Grand Lodge of Ohio, 
which is represented amongst us by our R.W. Bro. Andrew Thompson, 
the honorary secretary of our Girls' School, is one of, perhaps, the most 
important Masonic grand lodges in the world. They have 500 lodges 
and nearly seventy thousand subscribing Masons. That is a jurisdiction 



100 APPENDIX PART I. 



that to our poor small ideas look enormous. Their past grand master, 
and the chairman of their correspondence committee, our Brother Cun- 
ningham, is a Mason who is well known all over the world, and on the 
21st October last at the magnificent centenary commemoration of the 
constitution of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, on Brother Cunningham's 
nomination, that great body conferred the honorary membership of that 
grand lodge upon our brother the grand treasurer. And upon that day- 
week the Canongate Lodge, Kilwinning, No. 2, on the register of the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland, one of the oldest lodges in the world, also 
conferred the honorary membership of that lodge upon the grand treas- 
urer. That lodge dates from 1677 and took the foremost part in estab- 
lishing the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1736, just eleven years after the 
establishment of our own Grand Lodge of Ireland. It was the mother 
lodge of St. Clair, the first grand master of the Grand Lodge of Scot- 
land, and also of the Poet Robert Burns, of whose inauguration as poet 
laureate in that very lodge in 1787 we have in our board room a cele- 
brated engraving. Last, but not the least, the famous York Lodge No. 
236 on the register of the Grand Lodge of England, on the 16th No- 
vember elected our Brother Chetwode Crawley to be an honorary mem- 
ber of their lodge, the lineal descendant of the grand lodge which came 
into being at York just six months after our own grand lodge, and gave 
its characteristic name to the Ancient York Masons, whose ritual and 
usages we perpetuate today. In that lodge they not only perpetuate the 
traditions, but they also preserve many of the records of the Grand 
Lodge of All England. Nor was this all, for in the midst of these hon- 
orary distinctions on the 9th November, came the formal presentation 
by the Quatuor Coronati Lodge, of London, of the silver medal struck 
in honour of our grand treasurer under the auspices of that famous 
literary lodge. This superb medal is of the highest artistic merit, and 
through the influence of that eminent medallic expert, Bro. Carl Wiebe, 
of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, was struck at the German imperial 
mint of that city, and ranks among the most successful efforts of that 
celebrated establishment. 

Under the heading "Character of Candidates," he said: 
Now, brethren, there are a few matters which do not belong to any 
particular place or to any particular lodge, with reference to which I 
want to say a few words. I told you that in the report from the Prov- 
ince of Meath I learned that great care was being taken in that province 
as to the character of the persons who were admitted to the order. Now 
I want to impress upon you all that the duty of each one of us as a 
Mason is that we should exercise very special care as to the character 
of the men whom we admit to our fraternity. As a rule, reasonable 
care is taken, but I am sorry to have to say that one or two cases have 
come to my knowledge in which it appears to me that the brethren did 
not take sufficient care as to the character of the persons that they ad- 
mitted. It was with very considerable surprise, and pain too, that 
within the last few days I read a letter from a lodge under our juris- 
diction, calling attention to the extreme misconduct of a junior member 
of their lodge. Masons are not saints, any more than other people, but 
surely you would have thought a lodge ought to have found out what 
kind and manner of man their junior member was before they admitted 
him to the lodge. I do implore of you, brethren all, to be very par- 
ticular as to the character of the people whom you admit. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 101 



Under the title ''Resignation after Passing the Chair." he said : 
Now. brethren. I find that sometimes brethren do a thing which we 
regard as very objectionable. From time to time men send in their res- 
ignation to their lodges immediately after passing the chair. That is a 
thing that I do not think any Mason ought to do. I see amongst us 
here today a good many past masters of the order, and I think they 
intend to remain subscribing members as long as they live, and as long 
as they are able to attend to the duties of the order. That is what we 
all ought to do. I do think we ought to do everything that in us lies 
to discourage members from sending in a resignation as soon as they 
have the honour conferred on them of passing the chair of a subordi- 
nate lodge. 

In reference to the safe keeping of lodge funds he wisely observed : 
One other matter, brethren, that I think is of supreme importance. 
Undoubtedly, as a body. Masons are just as good business men as are 
to be found in any body of men in the outside world. Being a little 
proud of our Masonic brotherhood. I would be rather inclined to say 
they were rather better than the average lot that are to be found out- 
side ; but there is one thing as a matter of business in which I do not 
think we are quite up to what we ought to be. Money belonging to 
Masonic bodies ought to be kept in joint names. I know that the prin- 
ciple has been adopted in many of our Masonic bodies, but in many it 
has not. There is the habit of appointing a treasurer, and in many 
cases allowing him to retain the money of the lodge in his own indi- 
vidual possession. Well. now. he may keep it in his own house — it is a 
mistake for any man to keep much money in his house — he may put it 
into the bank in his own name, but in a separate account, keeping a Xo. 
2 account. That is better, but it is still not right. He may mix it up 
with his own money in his own banking account, which is decidedly 
wrong, because in every case, whether it is in a separate account or 
whether it is in his own banking account, the experience of the world 
shows that where men are called away suddenly, and leave behind, as it 
too often happens, families not well off. the man's bank book is con- 
sulted, his bankers are applied to. and it appears that he has got a cer- 
tain sum to his credit, and immediately the family think there is some 
ready money available, that there is something they have, and then after 
a few months, when perhaps some of the money has been spent, affairs 
have been looked into, and it is found that a substantial sum of the 
money lying to the individual's credit was money belonging to a Ma- 
sonic body of which he was the treasurer. Let no brother consent to 
be a treasurer except the body to which he is treasurer arrange for the 
opening of a banking account in a second name in addition to his own. 
If the lodge think it right, let the cheques upon the account be signed 
by the treasurer alone, do not require him to have to go to the secretary. 
or whoever may be associated with him. for the purpose of enabling him 
to draw cheques to meet the ordinary monthly expenditure of his lodge. 
but have the money in such a position that if the treasurer dies suddenly. 
it will remain in the name of some other person, and there will be no 
difficulty or embarrassment about the funds. 

He mentioned at some length a bequest of £32,000 to the two Ma- 
sonic schools from General Grahame, an old gentleman, who had been 
a great lover of the Masonic fraternity, though not himself a member. 



102 APPENDIX PART I. 



These schools now contain two hundred children, all the present 
buildings will accommodate, and a plan has been adopted of giving 
small sums — £l a month is the maximum — to the mothers or other guar- 
dians of children who need help but who cannot be admitted to the 
schools for lack of room. 

Eight pages are given up to accounts of Masonic church services, 
taken verbatim from various daily newspapers — a curious source for 
reports of Masonic affairs, it seems to us. 

There is no report of membership, but from the grand treasurer's 
abstract we learn that the receipts were £7,243 ; the expenditures, £3,964 ; 
investments, £838 ; balance in bank, £2,441. 

The Duke of Abercorn is grand master ; Lord Castledown, grand 
secretary ; Henry E, Flaveele, deputy grand secretary. Office : Free- 
mason's Hall, Molesworth street, Dublin. 



KANSAS, 1909. 

53rd Annual. Wichita. February 17. 

This attractively printed volume presents as a frontispiece an excellent 
likeness of Henry F. Mason, grand master, and also contains a half- 
tone of W. Bro. Spencer F. Wade, grand tyler, who died February 24, 
1908. There is also' a page holding the vignettes of nine appointive offi- 
cers, all looking so pleasant that one is at a loss to know whether to 
say that it is a handsome page or a group of handsome faces. There 
were present at grand lodge sixteen grand officers, eleven past grand 
officers, forty-three grand representatives, including M.W. Bro. Matthew 
M. Mieler, representing Illinois, three hundred and seventy-five repre- 
sentatives of lodges and one hundred and ninety-nine past masters. At 
the beginning of his address the grand master says : 

The past year has been one of continued prosperity to the order 
throughout this jurisdiction. The net gain in membership during 1908 
was 1,604, making the total on December 31, 32,072. Mere increase in 
numbers is not in itself to be regarded as a test of the welfare or prog- 
ress of the institution. It is, however, an indication that interest in the 
order is well maintained. But, judged by any criterion, the history of 
Masonry in Kansas for the past twelve months is a source of gratifica- 
tion from whatever angle it may be viewed. 

He reports that three new lodges were constituted, ten dispensations 
for the formation of lodges were issued and six corner-stones placed. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 103 



On account of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution by 
which custodians of the work were dispensed with, much additional 
work in interpreting the official cipher was thrown upon the grand 
master, who apparently needs the assistance of some specially author- 
ized officials to read what they have all promised shall not be written 
or printed. In discussing the various methods employed for dissem- 
inating the work in different jurisdictions the grand master gives the 
following statistical items, which we are glad to transcribe : 

In twenty-four of these jurisdictions grand lecturers have charge of 
the work, usually performing it without assistance ; they are : Alabama, 
Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Idaho, New Hampshire, Louis- 
iana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Mex- 
ico, North Dakota, Vermont, Nova Scotia, Oklahoma, Prince Edward 
Island, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, West Vir- 
ginia and Wisconsin ; Massachusetts and Louisiana have each two. In 
nine cases they are elected by the grand lodge, and in fifteen appointed 
by the grand master ; the term of service being one year, except in a 
single instance, where it is ten. Some of them are paid a salary by the 
grand lodge, varying from a merely nominal amount in several states 
to $1,800 a year, besides expenses, in California; (in New York the 
grand lecturer receives $2,400 a year and $1,000 for expenses, but is 
not classified here because he works under a board of custodians) ; oth- 
ers are paid on a per diem basis by the local lodges ; occasionally the 
methods are combined ; still others serve without compensation. Three 
other states have substantially the same system, although in two of 
them, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the officer is called an instructor, 
and in the third, Indiana, an inspector. In Wyoming the work is in 
charge of the grand master, and in Montana of the grand secretary. In 
eleven states custodians are maintained, although not always called by 
that name : Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, 
New York, North Carolina, Tennesee, Texas and Utah. They are gen- 
erally elected or appointed in rotation for a term of years. Various 
other methods are in vogue, the work being entrusted in five instances 
to district deputies, in others to several lecturers, by districts or other- 
wise, and in one — Illinois — to five grand examiners and 160 grand lec- 
turers. 

It will be seen from this statement that the methods in use vary so 
much as to make it difficult to draw a conclusion as to which has proved 
in experience the most satisfactory, although it is apparent that what 
may be called the grand lecturer system has met with much the largest 
acceptance. 

The following decisions were rendered, all of which were approved 
by the jurisprudence committee and adopted by the grand lodge: 

1. The fact that a member against whom charges are preferred is 
confined in the state penitentiary does not prevent the service of sum- 
mons upon him or his being tried, convicted and sentenced. 

2. The fact that a member has been convicted of a public offense in 
the state courts does not in and of itself constitute a ground for charges 
against him, but is such strong evidence of his guilt of the wrongful 



104 



APPENDIX PART I. 



act forming the basis of his conviction as ordinarily to be practically 
conclusive against him. 

3. Where a conviction is had upon charges preferred against a mem- 
ber it is not necessary that the sentence be pronounced by the officer 
who presided at the trial; being but the formal registration of the will 
of the lodge, it may be announced by the master. 

The Grand Lodges of Saskatchewan and Western Australia were on 
recommendation of the committee on correspondence officially recog- 
nized, and the passing of King Solomon Lodge No. 293, G.R.C. at 
Jerusalem, Palestine, was noted — this result coming through the cancel- 
lation of its warrant by the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province 
of Ontario. 

The able report on correspondence (165 pp.) is the seventh from the 
pen of Past Grand Master Matthew M. Miller, who devotes seven 
pages to a review of our meeting of 1908. He notes Grand Master 
Bell's reference to the prosperous condition of Masonry in Illinois, and 
to the Orphans' Home in Chicago, as well as the Masonic Home at 
Sullivan. 

He approves M.W. Bro. Bell's decision declining to grant dispensa- 
tions for lodges to attend church services on Sunday, wearing jewels 
and paraphernalia, and says that he gave "ample and satisfactory rea- 
sons for his action." 

The introduction of R.W. Bro. Fay Hempstead, the poet laureate 
of Masonry, is pleasantly noticed, and the passing of R.W. Bro. Gilbert 
W. Barnard is feelingly chronicled. He refers to the oration of R.W. 
Bro. Beach as excellent, and compliments its author by making a sum- 
mary of its trend and a liberal extract. He quotes in full the preamble 
and resolution offered by M.W. Bro. Moulton and referred to a special 
committee, on the recognition of Mexico and makes this a text for a 
long and rather elaborate argument in favor of the recognition of the 
Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico. He regards the fact that many grand 
lodges have recognized this body, and that the general grand chapter 
has instituted a chapter composed of Masons belonging to the Grand 
Lodge Valle de Mexico as strong points in its favor, and alleges that 
the trend of Masonic opinion among the grand jurisdictions of the 
world is for its recognition. He says of Brother Robbins' report on 
correspondence that it shows his accustomed versatility and ability. 

He refers to Brother Robbins' comments on various topics in a way 
to indicate rather careful reading, and a high regard for his opinions, 
but reserves to himself the privilege of disagreeing with his conclusions 
in discussing the question, "What are to be considered essentials in 
determining a request for recognition of another grand lodge?" 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 105 

In discussing this question he alludes to "institutions," "mind-read- 
ings" and psychological subtleties into which we find ourselves unable 
to follow him, nor do we understand his reference to "Topeka Dutch." 
However, without attempting to unravel the intricacies of the debate we 
may still be permitted to express an opinon in an humble way upon the 
main point at issue, and that is "what entitles a body claiming to be a 
grand lodge to Masonic recognition." 

The very fact that the question arises is evidence that there are 
illegitimate as well as regular organizations. To determine which are 
legitimate there must be some agreed standard or criterion by which to 
judge them. This standard cannot ante-date the grand lodge system, 
but must have come into existence when that system, plan or method of 
organization was inaugurated — there is therefore no call to consider 
matters previous to the time when the "Charges of a Freemason" 
were agreed upon as the platform, magna charta or bill of rights, set- 
ting forth the landmarks, principles and ground work of the institution. 

Coincident with, and practically a part of it, a formula was adopted 
by which the perpetuity of its obligations and restrictions was insured 
by requiring all masters at their installation to assent to and bind them- 
selves to enforce certain principles and regulations. v Among these is 
the admission that "no new lodge shall be formed without permission 
of the grand lodge, that no countenance be given to any irregular lodge 
or to any person clandestinely initiated therein, being contrary to the 
ancient charges of Freemasonry." 

To us it seems entirely clear and plain that this confines the element 
of legitimacy and regularity to those lodges which have been formed 
by permission of grand lodges, and that the latter can be formed only 
from lodges thus authorized. If it is urged that this necessarily re- 
stricts recognition to the descendants of that Masonry which existed 
in the British Isles, at the formation of the grand lodge system, we can 
only reply, "So mote it be." If it can be shown that there is good 
Masonry outside these limits, we shall not object though we do main- 
tain, that the matter of recognition and mutual endorsement grows out 
of the grand lodge system as above briefly and imperfectly outlined and 
that there cannot be any recognition of lodges whose title comes from 
any other body than a regular grand lodge, nor of any grand lodge 
made up of lodges other than those constituted by legitimate grand 
lodges. The Masonry of Mexico is confessedly so lacking in this es- 
sential quality as to have no claim to recognition. 

We do not overlook the quiet little thrust our good brother gives US 
in mentioning the recognition of Cuba by the Grand Lodge of Illinois. 



106 APPENDIX PART I. 



If it can be shown that the Masonry of Cuba does not strictly con- 
form to the standard above set up, we can only reply that possibly a 
mistake was made, but if such is the fact it does not prove that we 
must for the sake of consistency keep on in error, but rather shows 
that in 1898, the sympathy for the political wrongs of Cuba and the 
enthusiasm aroused by the universal cry of "Remember the Maine," and 
"Cuba libre" were strong enough to affect even so conservative a body 
as the Grand Lodge of Illinois, and to induce it to act contrary to the 
advice of its committee on correspondence. 

Fred Washbon, Anthony, grand master; Albert K. Wilson, To- 
peka, grand secretary. 



KENTUCKY, 1908. 

108th Annual. Louisville. October 20. 

The fly-leaf of the volume bears an illustration of the design adopted 
for "the authorized past master's jewel in this jurisdiction," which is 
described as follows : 

The past master's jewel shall be of gold — plain, or ornamented with 
chasings of gems — and consist of a pair of compasses whose points are 
extended about sixty degrees upon a graduated segment (1-4 part) of a 
circle (or 90 degrees) between which the effulgent sun is represented. 

Its size and hangings are optional — whether the jewel be worn as a 
watch-charm or a coat-badge — but no addition of any circle or wreath. 
or other device, are to be made to the foregoing adopted design. 

Following this is shown a picture of the Hiram Bassett memorial 
prize medal awarded to two pupils in the Masonic Widows' and Or- 
phans' Home of Kentucky for superior scholarship and deportment. On 
the opposite page is a panel half-tone of Henry P. Barret, grand 
master 1907-8. 

The grand lodge was opened in ample form on the third degree at 
9 :30 a. m,, Tuesday, October 20, 1908. 

At the request of the grand master, P.G.M. Chas. H. Fisk explained 
the causes that made it necessary for the grand lodge to assemble in 
the Scottish Rite cathedral instead of the auditorium of the Masonic 
temple. In short that the lessee declined to give possession of the 
building. This is more fully explained in the reports of the grand 
master and of the board of trustees, from which it appears that not 
only a difference of opinion but also a deal of litigation had arisen 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 107 

about the proper interpretation of the terms of the lease to an amuse- 
ment company. The grand master was able to report, however, that he 
thought the troubles were in a fair way of solution and that in his 
judgment "the Masonic temple as a business proposition had seen its 
gloomiest days." In this connection we of Illinois, not having a temple, 
may console ourselves with the old lady's prayer, "Blessed be noth- 
ing." ' 

Of the twenty-five past grand masters whose names are listed twen- 
ty-one were present, and the representatives of 537 lodges are recorded. 

The address of Grand Master Henry P. Barret opens with the fol- 
lowing words of reverent gratitude and felicitation : 

With hearts abounding in gratitude to "Him who doeth all things 
well and whose mercies endureth forever," we are once more permitted 
to assemble in grand communication, and to all of you I extend a most 
hearty and fraternal welcome to this, the one hundred and eighth an- 
nual communication of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. 

The year just finishing, with all of its joys and sorrows, its tri- 
umphs and failures, with its commercial depressions and its abundant 
harvests, marked, I regret to say, by more of hatred, strife and lawless- 
ness within the confines of our otherwise proud old commonwealth 
than it has known since the dark days of the civil war, has, none the 
less, been one of the most prosperous years in the history of this grand 
jurisdiction. 

From all quarters comes the almost unvarying report from the lodges 
of increased membership, enhanced interest in all things Masonic, and 
that peace and harmony universally prevail. I am also delighted to re- 
port to you that nothing has happened to disturb the comity heretofore 
enjoyed between this grand lodge and its sister grand lodges of the 
United States. 

From the decisions rendered by the grand master we copy the fol- 
lowing: 

2. Can a brother who has been suspended for non-payment of due> 
for a number of years, presumably over two, and who is now engaged 
in running a whisky house, be reinstated in his lodge? 

Answer — No. 

5. Having been suspended for non-payment of dues over two years. 
and having since paid his dues in full and petitioned in the regular way. 
he was by ballot rejected. What is his Masonic standing? 

Held: You remain suspended and until you are reinstated by the 
lodge through the ballot box you will remain suspended for non-payment 
of dues, notwithstanding the fact that the dues for which y«u had been 
previously suspended have since been paid in full. 

The committee on jurisprudence to whom his decisions were re- 
ferred, reported on them as follows, and their report was adopted : 

A brother suspended for non-payment of dues for over two years 
petitioned for reinstatement ; the petition was accompanied by the 



108 APPENDIX PART I. 



amount of his dues in arrears, and the petitioner was rejected. The 
grand master decided that as he was indebted to the lodge for the 
amount, it should be retained. 

The decision is approved, with the suggestion that if the circum- 
stances seemed to justify it, there is no reason why the lodge should not 
return the amount so paid to the suspended brother. 

The grand master is asked whether a Mason who has been sus- 
pended for more than two years, and who is now engaged in running 
a whisky house, can be reinstated. His answer is "No." 

The law forbidding the reception into the order of persons engaged 
in the liquor traffic is of such recent date that very little legislation, if 
any, has been had upon the contingent questions growing out of it. 

We think that you will agree with us that it seemed to be the pur- 
pose of the grand lodge to prevent, as far as possible, this class from 
ever getting into the order, and we believe, from the tenor of the de- 
bate upon the floor of the grand lodge, there would have been no un- 
certainty as to its action. 

The grand lodge has seen fit to interpose the ballot between the 
coming back of a member of a lodge who has been suspended for non- 
payment of dues for more than two years, thus practically placing such, 
in a sense and to a degree, upon the same footing as a profane, and by 
this action, by analogy, making him ineligible to any of the benefits or 
privileges of Masonry. 

We approve the decision. 

As Illinois has no legislation definitely specifying the particular voca- 
tions in which a Mason may or may not engage, the complications here 
dealt with could not arise with us. We may, however, venture the sug- 
gestion that in these cases matters would have been simplified and the 
ends of Masonry have been better and more directly reached, if less 
attention had been paid to the question of non-payment of dues, or 
purely pecuniary status and more to the question of immoral and un- 
masonic conduct. 

In the following we are glad to find the committee and the grand 
lodge fully in accord with the position of Illinois on the question : 

In decision No. 4 the grand master holds that it is unlawful to hold 
a raffle under Masonic auspices, and that it is equally unlawful for a 
Mason to purchase tickets in such a raffle. This decision is also ap- 
proved. 

Any violation of the laws of God or of the state is a violation of 
Masonic law. Raffling is gambling; gambling is a violation of the 
moral law and of the laws of the state. 

A large number of decisions by deputy grand masters were reported 
on by the committee but as they rest largely upon local conditions or 
lodge by-laws we omit them, though some of them are very interesting. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 109 

The grand master reported that several lodges had lost their char- 
ters by fire or otherwise and had been authorized by him to continue 
working until the communication of the grand lodge. In Illinois it has 
been held that such authorization by the grand master is unnecessary, 
on the basis that the grand lodge record showing the existence of the 
right to work and do business is sufficient warrant therefor — till visible 
proof in the form of a new charter is issued. 

Dispensations for twelve new lodges were granted and thirteen 
lodges were constituted. 

Total lodges on the roll, 533. Total membership reported October 
1, 1908, 32,770. 

The committee on work submitted a report of their labors, and of- 
fered the following recommendation : 

First — That the work as presented by the committee be adopted and 
known as the authorized work in Kentucky. 

Second — That the committee be continued with instructions to each 
one to open a school of instruction in his section, as provided in the 
report of the committee on work, page 85, proceedings of the grand 
lodge of 1907. 

Brother Ranshaw offered the following substitute, which was 
adopted : 

That this grand lodge fully appreciates the arduous task performed 
by the committee on uniform work, and, recognizing the fact that the 
time has been too short to perfect the work, it is now ordered that the 
report be referred back to the committee, with instructions to perfect 
the work and report at the next communication of the grand lodge. 

Brother Holland offered the following resolution which was re- 
ferred to the committee : 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Kentucky declines to adhere to 
or to accept the statement made in the exemplification of the first de- 
gree, that the sun "sets" in the west. 

We hope the committee will not overlook this in its report, because 
it is important for the craft to know what the sun does if it does not 
"set," and where it is when it does it. 

The report on correspondence (127 pp.) is by Past Grand Master 
William W. Clarke, giving a condensed but comprehensive summary 
of the important transactions of the various grand lodges. That he 
highly regards the work of the Illinois correspondent is shown by this 
extract from his report : 

We certainly appreciate Brother Robbins' words of commendation. 
We feel reasonably sure that we are right on any given question when 
we find that it has his support. 



110 APPENDIX PART I. 



Referring to our commendation of the New York law against clan- 
destinism, he says : "Occasionally we strike something that stumps us, 
and such is the report under review in his commendation ot the New 
York departure in invoking legislative action by the state in matters 
purely Masonic, such as clandestinism in Masonry." 

We confess we had not looked at it in that light before. We will 
have to give the matter a little more thought. Maybe we went off too 
quick that time. 

In conclusion he says : 

Even a cursory reading of the proceedings of the grand lodges of 
the world discovers the fact that Masonry is phenomenally increasing 
its membership, and, what is yet more gratifying, . its morale was never 
higher. 

There is, however, one tendency, plainly observable, to which atten- 
tion should be called, and against which a voice should be raised. We 
allude to the disposition, manifest in every jurisdiction, to legislate on 
every conceivable subject, the result of which is not only the multipli- 
cation of unnecessary and, in some instances, as might be expected, the 
enactment of vicious laws, but the extinction of every vestige of right 
and privilege of the subordinate lodges, and the centralization of all 
authority in the grand lodge. If a halt is not called, the time is not 
distant, we fear, when the sole function of subordinate lodges will be 
to make Masons. 

Virgil P. Smith, Somerset, grand master; Henry B. Grant, Ma- 
sonic Temple, Louisville, grand secretary. 



LOUISIANA, 1909. 

97th Annual. New Orleans. February 1. 

On the fly-leaf we find a portrait of M.W. Bro. Edwin Marks, who 
was grand master in 1879 and 1880, and later in the volume are half- 
tones of Littleberry Calhoun Allen, grand master in 1906, and Fred- 
erick Cade Marsh, deputy grand master in 1908. The grand lodge was 
opened by the R.W. senior grand warden, N. B. Null, acting as grand 
master. The following extract from his address explains why it fell 
to his lot to perform this function : 

Since last we met in annual communication, another year fraught 
with its possibilities and opportunities, has passed away. At its opening, 
as your senior grand warden, there was no indication that I would be 
called upon to administer your affairs for any part of the time, or to 
preside over this, your ninety-seventh annual session, but the necessity 
placed upon your grand master, of leaving the state on account of 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. Un- 



changed business relations after only five months of active service fol- 
lowed by the speedy and unlooked-for death of our esteemed deputy 
grand master, forced upon my shoulders the mantle of authority with 
its consequent responsibilities and I have made an honest endeavor to 
discharge the duties of the exalted position in such a manner as to merit 
your approval. It, therefore, becomes my duty, as acting grand master, 
to greet and welcome you to this grand communication. 

There were present in addition to the usual corps of grand officers, 
six past grand masters, thirty-three envoys from other jurisdictions, 
including Bro. Charles F. Buck, the ambassador from Illinois, and the 
representatives of 161 chartered lodges. 

In his address Brother Null gives at some length an account of the 
troubles that arose from the efforts to plant spurious Masonry among 
the faithful, but here is his story in his own words : 

At the outset of the year, the work of the order in the city of New 
Orleans was disturbed to some small extent by the attempted introduc- 
tion of Cerneauism into the state, but the grand master, by prompt ac- 
tion predicated upon previous legislation by your M.W. body in the 
year 1890, handled the proposition with little difficulty or friction, and 
it is safe to say that the peace and harmony of our different subordinate 
bodies will never again be threatened by its reappearance. I take pleas- 
ure in making a part of this report as an appendix, the circulars and 
papers in connection, and hope that you will give them due considera- 
tion and weight and approve the acts of your official head. 

It is proper to report in this connection that the person — a Master 
Mason, I am informed, in go'od standing in a lodge under the jurisdic- 
tion of a grand lodge with which this grand lodge is in fraternal com- 
munication — whose name appears in these circulars, has taken personal 
exception to them on the ground that they contain references to him as 
a man which he considered "libellous and defamatory," and he has. on 
that theory, instituted a suit for damages in the modest sum of fifty 
thousand dollars, against this M.W. grand lodge, in the civil district 
court for the parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana. 

It is not my province to express an opinion in this regard. The case, 
of course, has to be defended, but I am advised that it need not be 
taken seriously. 

The grand master's acts are not the acts of the grand lodge until in 
terms approved by it. 

The grand lodge is not concerned with the particular verbiage or 
expression which the grand master employed in his communications to 
the Masons of this jurisdiction. 

His object manifestly was to inform the craft of this state that a 
body calling itself Masonic was endeavoring to establish itself in this 
jurisdiction; that that body had been declared by this grand lodge to 
be "spurious and clandestine," and that, therefore, any association with 
it by Master Masons under allegiance to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, 
would be deemed to be Masonic intercourse with a Mason or a body ot 
Masons, in this jurisdiction, declared '•clandestine." which would neces- 
sarily involve the penalty of expulsion from our lodges. 



112 APPENDIX PART I. 



Obviously, it was therefore, not only the grand master's right, but 
his duty, to warn the craft under his jurisdiction. 

In considering, therefore, the action of the grand master in the 
premises, the grand lodge should limit itself to the expression of ap- 
proval or disapproval to this scope and intent, without reference to any 
foreign or personal comment not a part of the declaration of the law 
of this grand jurisdiction on the subject. 

As above-stated, in my humble opinion, the grand master has cor- 
rectly stated the law and attitude of this grand lodge as to the body or 
bodies which the person in question claimed to represent, and, to that 
extent, his action should be approved. 

After the publication of these circulars, a number of Master Masons 
— about twelve — members of city lodges, admitted, in response to the 
edict, in that regard, that they had had Masonic communication with 
the party. The extent of it was not ascertained ; but, in open lodge, the 
brethren declared their withdrawal and recantation. The grand master, 
according to his edicts, permitted the explanation to be accepted, con- 
doned the offense, and so the "incident" was closed. 

The committee on jurisprudence to whom this part of his address 
was referred, reported thereon as follows : 

Your committee on Masonic' law and jurisprudence, beg to submit 
this report on that part of the acting grand master's address, reporting 
the action of M.W. Grand Master J. C. Drew, in regard to the attempt 
of one M. W. Bayliss, to organize Scottish Rite bodies in this state, 
under an alleged Supreme Council of the United States of America, 
etc., as follows : 

Your committee is of the opinion that the recommendation of the 
acting grand master on the action of M.W. Grand Master J. C. Drew, 
in so far as his circulars of March 14, 24, and April 23, state correctly 
the law of this jurisdiction in regard to the bodies, which the committee 
is informed said M. W. Bayliss intended and attempted to establish in 
this state, as well as to the penalty, necessarily falling on any Master 
Mason who owes allegiance to this grand lodge, as a consequence of 
accepting such alleged degrees, or joining such bodies, should be ap- 
proved. 

Your committee take cognizance of the fact that in his petition, filed 
in the civil district court, for the parish of Orleans, suing this grand 
lodge for damages, said M. W. Bayliss declares that he was "trying to 
establish in this city and state (New Oreans, La.), certain 'Scottish Rite 
bodies' of which he (said Bayliss) is the head," which fact, further 
proved by the action of a number of B.B., who confessed and recanted, 
show that the necessity existed for the warning, which was sent out to 
the brethren of the jurisdiction. 

Since some time in 1858, when dissension in Scottish Rite ranks in 
this state were terminated by union of various Scottish Rite bodies, 
accepting a renewed charter, as the Grand Consistory of the Thirty- 
second Degree of the A. and A. Scottish Rite from the Supreme Coun- 
cil of said Rite of the Southern Jurisdiction, this M.W. grand lodge 
has recognized said grand consistory and its subordinate bodies and the 
said Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction as the lawful gov- 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. H3 



erning bodies of the Rite, in this state, and therefore, logically, every 
other body is as to this jurisdiction clandestine. 

In 1885, this grand lodge approved the following from the report of 
the committee on foreign correspondence, M.W. Bro. J. Q. A. Fellows, 
chairman : 

"The Grand Lodge of Louisiana has long since declared what is Ma- 
sonry, and what are Masonic bodies. Of course, all or any body not 
recognized by her as true and legitimate is not Masonic; and if claimed 
by the peddlers of such wares as Masonic, must stand stamped as spur- 
ious, irregular and clandestine. So, brothers in Louisiana, beware ! 
Touch not the unclean things, not recognized by the grand lodge as 
Masonic. Have nothing to do with them, for the consequence must 
necessarily be expulsion." (Foreign Correspondence 1885, page 111.) 

And in the same year, this grand lodge adopted the following reso- 
lution : (Proceedings of 1885, page 224.) 

"The Grand Lodge of Louisiana has exercised the right and claims 
that it is her duty, as well as that of every other grand lodge, as the 
foundation and basis of all Freemasonry, to ascertain and declare what 
institution or bodies claiming to be Masonic or calling themselves Ma- 
sonic, are really Masonry and if of the true body of Masonry, or fraud- 
ulent, spurious or clandestine, and to warn the craft of Louisiana against 
such as are not legitimate and true, even by prohibitive edicts, if neces- 
sary." 

In the "Circular" communication of April 23, 1908, the M.W. grand 
master recites at length the action of this grand lodge in 1890, on the 
subject of Cerneau-Masonry, wherein it is distinctly declared that it 
has ever been held "illegitimate" and not to be recognized by this 
grand lodge as "regular Masonry." 

This committee approves the prompt action taken by the grand mas- 
ter to ascertain the extent to which said M. W. Bayliss may have suc- 
ceeded in obtaining followers, or adherents to him, or his bodies by 
directing the worshipful masters of lodges to summon the membership 
for that purpose. 

We approve of the conclusion (or fact) with which he warned the 
craft of the consequences of joining the Bayliss bodies, which must neces- 
sarily impose the penalty of expulsion. 

In this he only carried out the law and will of the fraternity of 
this jurisdiction as expressed in the resolutions of 1885, above quoted. 

We approve of the opportunity he afforded the B.B., who unfortu- 
nately had violated our laws, to allow the offense to be condoned by 
voluntary confession and renunciation of allegiance to the illegal body. 

And we recommend that this M.W. grand lodge approve this report 
and the action of grand master in the premises, in so far as said cir- 
culars state the law of the case; the clandestine character of the bodies 
claimed to be represented by said M. W. Bayliss, and the warnings given 
out and conditions imposed on those who had "Masonic intercourse.'' 
with him, in regard to the unlawful intent to establish "bodies" in this 
jurisdiction. 



114 APPENDIX PART I. 



We are informed by the petition in the suit for damages above re- 
ferred to, that Mr. Bayliss claims that the grand master wrongfully 
libelled him in using the terms, bogus, spurious, irregular and clandes- 
tine, and referring to him as a "peddler of degrees" and as an "inter- 
loper." The question whether these things constitute libel in law under 
all the attendant circumstances is, therefore, to be determined by the 
law of the land, and it would be indelicate and out of place for this 
committee, or for this grand lodge to express an opinion on that subject. 

It is proper to say, however, that while this grand lodge accepts re- 
sponsibility for the acts of the grand master in designating the bodies, 
which Mr. Bayliss represented and endeavored to establish here as il- 
legitimate, irregular and clandestine, it should decline to approve or ac- 
cept responsibility for anything distinctly personal ; it should declare 
that it limits its approval as in the recommendations, above set forth, 
to the statement of the law of this jurisdicion and the consequence of 
its violations, and expressly disclaims any intention thereby to bring 
into the issue so made the personal character or reputation of Mr. Bay- 
liss, or any other person, connected with this matter, and therefore, this 
committee recommends that this grand body, while approving the official 
declaration of the grand master of the law of this jurisdiction, does not 
approve or accept, as an act, for which it is legally or morally respon- 
sible, irrelevant or personal, matter, if any, contained in the grand mas- 
ter's publications and affirmatively disclaims any intention to reflect on 
the personal and moral character of Mr. W. M. Bayliss. 

Your committee having thus fully and in detail discussed the condi- 
tions and expressed its opinions with recommendations, does not deem 
any other specific action necessary and therefore submits this report 
with the request that it be approved with the recommendations and so 
adopted by this grand lodge. 

The record says that : 

On motion, duly adopted, the report of the committee was received, 
the action of the grand master, as covered by the committee, fully en- 
dorsed. 

And thus we find the whole matter left in "a delightful condition of 
uncertainty" until a decision has been reached by the courts, or until 
(as we think more probable) the suit has been withdrawn and all is left 
in status quo. Our brethren of Louisiana are in a state of turmoil and 
unhappiness in which they have our sympathy, but which in our opinion 
they brought upon themselves by going outside their legitimate domain 
"to look for trouble." In our review of Arkansas (ante) the opinion 
is expressed that any legislation in regard to any of the so-called higher 
bodies is out of place in a grand lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and that it will be conducive to harmony to permit no refer- 
ence to the never ending quarrels of the different branches of the Scot- 
tish Rite in grand lodge, save such reference and discussion as may be 
necessary to defend the sovereignty of Ancient Craft Masonry when it 
is assailed. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. . 115 

If any justification for that opinion is needed, it is abundantly fur- 
nished in the above extracts, which also thrust upon us a sufficient ex- 
cuse for some further comments on the subject, although we cannot ex- 
pect that our contribution will be more than the glow worm's spark as 
compared to the calcium lights that our predecessor and others have 
thrown upon it. We commend to our Louisiana brethren and others 
who may be involved in similar trouble the philosophy of the boy, who 
when asked what denomination his father belonged to replied. "'Mam' 
and I 'aint borrowin' much trouble about dad. As long as he brings his 
wages home and stays in nights, we don't care whether he is a Presby- 
terian or a cabinet maker." 

Masonry investigates a man's character before initiation and looks 
after his conduct afterwards always from the individual standpoint, and 
in the ultimate analysis the decision in every case is rendered by the 
ballots of the brethren as individuals, and not by the collective ukase of 
a body legislating for a class. In Illinois we do not attempt to pre- 
scribe by legislation the vocation which a man may or may not pursue 
nor the society he may join so long as he behaves himself properly and 
''hoes corn.'' 

In all the two score and more years that the writer has been a mem- 
ber of lodge, chapter, council, commandery and consistory he has never 
learned how one of these bodies could legislate for another, but has 
been educated to believe that each was sufficient unto itself in its own 
domain. The fact that membership in one may be a prerequisite to 
membership in another is purely an individual qualification just as phys- 
ical completeness or moral character is. and out of this requirement no 
greater license to control matters follows in one case than in the other. 
A law that confined the benefit of Masonry to red-headed men. would 
not make every man with auburn locks a Mason, nor give him pre-emi- 
nence in Masonry's ranks. 

A little careful thinking along these lines would do much to clear 
up the muddle that exists in the minds of many young and ambitious 
Masons (especially the newly made thirty-two-ster") about the rights, 
privileges and dominating influence of the high numbered degrees. 

Turn the tree the other end up and remember that the branches are 
descendants and not parents. Ancient Craft Masonry, the Symbolic 
Masonry of the three degrees, is the monarch and king we honor. 

But the consideration of this interesting topic has led us so far 
afield that we had almost forgotten that we were writing a review of 

Louisiana, and we must return to our muttons. 



116 APPENDIX PART I. 



The committee on work submitted the following report: 

Your committee on work respectfully beg leave to submit that at 

the session of the M.W. grand lodge of 1905, the following resolution 

was adopted by the grand lodge: 

Resolved, That every Master Mason at the first stated meeting of 
the lodge in which he is raised, thirty days after being raised, shall be 
examined in open lodge as to his proficiency in the Master's degree, 
as in the preceding degrees, and this examination shall be repeated from 
meeting to meeting until he shall have been found proficient in the 
lecture. And he shall be bound to attend such examination. 

Your committee on work regretfully beg leave to say that many of 
the lodges are not carrying out the above resolution, and candidates af- 
ter being raised to the sublime degree of a Master Mason are not re- 
quired to stand the examination in open lodge and prove their proficiency. 
The committee on work recommend that the above resolution be either 
canceled and made null and void, or the grand master be instructed to 
take such measures as is necessary or expedient to put in force the 
resolution above quoted. 

Your committee on work respectfully beg leave to report that officers 
of the lodges are not accepting the esoteric work of this grand lodge. 
They do not attend the schools of instruction of the grand lecturers nor 
attempt to qualify themselves for their respective positions. As uni- 
formity of work is demanded by this grand jurisdiction, and as its eso- 
teric work is beautiful in its very simplicity and completeness, and most 
thoroughly promulgated by its very efficient grand lecturers, your com- 
mittee on work recommend that from and after this date no worshipful 
master or warden be installed to office until he has submitted to an ex- 
amination and proven his ability to open a lodge and confer the three 
degrees correctly. 

Upon the first part of this report the action of the grand lodge was 
to adopt the following resolution : 

That every Master Mason made after the date of its adoption, be 
compelled to submit to an examination before the lodge, within thirty 
days after the degree was conferred, this examination to be as complete 
in its scope as that for the E.A. and F.C. degrees, and to the satisfaction 
of the lodge. 

The recommendation that masters and wardens submit to an exam- 
ination before being installed went to the committee on jurisprudence, 
from whom no report is given on the subject. They probably want time 
to consider the matter, and we could wish that the grand lodge had been 
a little slow in adopting the requirement that compels a Master Mason 
to qualify in the work. W'e are a firm believer in the ritual and think 
that every Mason worthy of the name should be "well posted," but we 
believe that after a brother becomes a Master Mason he should choose 
for himself whether he will qualify himself to rank as a bright and 
shining light or remain a 1 drone. Let it be a matter of persuasion and 
ambition, rather than of compulsion and penalization. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. H7 

The ritual is a means (and often or always the best means) to an 
end, but it is not the only means. Nor is a knowledge of the work the 
only or even the chief qualification for the master's chair. 

A resolution looking to the celebration of the centennial of the grand 
lodge in 1912 was referred to the committee on state of the order, upon 
whose recommendation consideration of the subject was postponed till 
the annual meeting of 1910. 

From the address of R.W. Bro. C. C. Kramer, grand orator, we 
quote the following: 

There can never be any conflict between Masonry and religion. They 
are sisters of a divine consanguinity. As I have been endeavoring to 
trace the development of Masonic truth, so it shall not be my purpose 
to evolve religious thought in man from its humblest origin. Much of 
this evolutionary process of Masonry and religion is the same and often 
we find them inter-explanatory. Man's religious faith is born of man's 
human necessities. When man makes his first discovery of himself, it 
is a self of imperfections and limitations. The boundary of the finite 
touches the infinite. Though man cannot "find out the Almighty unto 
perfection," yet, the wider the expanse of human knowledge and the 
greater the variety of human experience, the more intelligent will be 
man's faith in God. 

The report on correspondence (126 pp.) is another of those able 
contributions from the hand of that skilled and experienced workman, 
Bro. Herman C. Duncan. 

He gives five of his well-written pages to Illinois and devotes them 
in large measure to a discussion of points in which he heartily concurs 
or as frankly disagrees with Brother Robbins. 

He shows a careful reading and earnest consideration of Brother 
Robbins' positions and arguments, and we think is progressing towards 
a fuller agreement therewith. We marked several points for attention, 
but we have already reprinted so much from the Louisiana report that 
we cannot give the space. We believe that with Brother Duncan's 
evident desire to be fair and to concede that he may be in error, he 
will after further study of the facts presented by Brother Robbins con- 
clude that he can agree with him, particularly in the matter of with- 
holding recognition from alleged grand bodies that cannot show legiti- 
mate descent from the Masonry of the British Isles. 

L. E. Thomas, Shreveport, grand master; Richard Lambert, New 
Orleans, grand secretary. 



118 APPENDIX PART I. 



MAINE, 1909. . 

90th Annual. Portland. May 4. 

The grand lodge was opened in ample form by M.W. Bro. Edmund 
B. Mallet, grand master, and a full corps of grand lodge officers, with 
prayer by Rev. Bro. Wm. H. Fultz, grand chaplain. 

There were in attendance 249 delegates representing 189 of the 201 
lodges, ten of the twelve past grand masters, twenty-two of the twenty- 
five district deputy grand masters, a long list of permanent members 
and fifty representatives of other grand jurisdictions, Bro. William 
R. G. Estes answering for Illinois. 

After the announcement of various standing committees the grand 
master delivered his address, from which we extract the following: 

Brethren, with a heart full of reverence for our beloved order, with 
a full acknowledgment of the honor you so graciously invested me with 
one year ago, I now fraternally and cordially welcome you to this the 
ninetieth annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Maine. 

I am pleased to say that the year last past has been one of peace 
and harmony ; peace has been triumphant and harmony has prevailed 
throughout this grand jurisdiction. 

Our relations with other grand jurisdictions have remained most 
friendly and fraternal, and I am glad to report that throughout this 
land, peace and harmony prevail, and the earnest desire of all is that 
this condition may remain so, to the end that Masonry may fulfill its 
highest mission. 

The year last past has been a prosperous one, not so much as some 
that have preceded it, but the membership of this grand jurisdiction is 
at present, 27,864, a gain of 508, and while we have not gained greatly, 
let us hope that the high standard has been maintained. I think you will 
agree with me when I say that too much care cannot be exercised in 
the material we receive into the order. 

He reported granting dispensations to twenty-five lodges to attend 
divine service in commemoration of St. John's day and to one lodge to 
attend church service on another day, from which it would appear that 
the church-going habit is measurably a matter of times and seasons in 
Maine. On the subject of dispensations for another purpose the grand 
master has this to say : 

I have not granted dispensations to enable lodges to receive appli- 
cation for degrees in less time than that provided for by our constitu- 
tion. I have carefully considered each case and was fully convinced 
that in denying the petition I had complied with what I thought would 
meet with your approval. I am satisfied that candidates for the degrees 
of Masonry have ample time to apply and that there is no need of ask- 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 119 



ing for a dispensation. While the grand master is clothed with great 
power, he should use that power only in cases of most urgent need. 

Which reminds us that grand masters do not always reach the same 
conclusion from similar premises. Of the celebration in Boston he re- 
ports as follows : 

October 3d, 4th and 5th, I was in attendance at Boston, Mass., upon 
the 175th anniversary of St. John's Lodge, the oldest lodge in America, 
and instituted in the year 1733. The officers and brethren of St. John's 
Lodge are to be congratulated upon their efforts to make this occasion 
one long to be remembered by the visiting grand masters, representing 
the original thirteen states, with the exception of Georgia, whose grand 
master was detained at home. The grand master of Nova Scotia was 
in attendance. From the moment your grand master arrived in Boston 
until the last good-bye had been spoken, his stay was made pleasant. 
The program for each day's exercises was most appropriate. Time and 
space will not permit me to enumerate the attentions shown the visiting 
grand masters and their ladies. If the pleasure of the brethren of 
St. John's Lodge is to be measured by the pleasure given their visitors, 
then the cup of pleasure of St. John's Lodge must be overflowing. 

We are pleased to note that we have here an example of a grand mas- 
ter who encourages rather than deprecates the habit of asking questions. 
Here is what he says on the subject: 

Many questions have been asked and answers returned. All of these 
could have been answered by reference to our constitution and Masonic 
Text Book, or reference to decisions made by former grand masters. 
The questions sent to me have all been answered over and over again, 
and I have answered every one. I do not consider it necessary to take 
up the time of the grand lodge by presenting them here. I have made no 
decision the past year, as no question would be deemed worthy of being 
called a decision that would necessitate your passing upon. 

I believe that the brethren in asking the questions were influenced by 
the desire to be sure of their position before acting hastily, and I may 
add that if all brethren, when controversies arise, would ascertain beyond 
doubt the true course to pursue, much trouble would be saved. I com- 
mend them for their anxiety to be right, and assure them that it was a 
pleasure to answer their questions. 

From the report of the committee on returns we learn that the total 
membership is 27,864, an increase of 508 during the year. During the 
afternoon of the second day of the session the work of the third degree 
was exemplified before the grand lodge, under the supervision of the 
grand lecturer, by the officers of Deering Lodge. 

There was an adverse report from a committee who had considered 
the proposition to grant dimits to Entered Apprentices and Fellowcrafts 
and their report was adopted. 

Sixty-five pages of the proceedings arc occupied by the reports of 
the twenty-five district deputy grand masters, whose reports indicate a 
harmonious and prosperous condition of the craft. 



120 APPENDIX PART I. 



The report on correspondence (110 pp.) is from the pen of Bro. Al- 
bro E. Chase, who makes a condensed but interesting summary of grand 
lodge affairs, giving three pages to Illinois. 

After a brief extract from the introduction of Grand Master Bell's 
address he gives the substance of his decision regarding lodge trustees, 
the re-instatement of suspended Masons, the use of «lodge funds, and 
church attendance in lodge capacity. He refers to the oration of Brother 
Beach as "learned and interesting" and prints a liberal quotation there- 
from. He says of the report of Brother Robbins that its three hundred 
and fifty pages are good reading and give great information. 

He quotes from Brother Robbins' report what he said under Arkan- 
sas on the subject of the proposed peace congress, and also under Dela- 
ware his discussion of documentary evidence. He closes his reference to 
Brother Robbins' report in these words : 

We commend our readers to the report of Brother Robbins, as it con- 
tains meat enough to last one almost a lifetime. 

Edmund B. Mallett, Portland, re-elected grand master; Stephen 
Berry, Portland, re-elected grand secretary. 



MANITOBA, 1909. 

34th Annual. Winnipeg. June 9 

At this meeting twenty-five grand officers, eleven past grand masters, 
two past deputy grand masters, thirty-two past grand wardens and dis- 
trict deputy grand masters, forty-six representatives of other grand 
lodges (including M.W. Bro. John Leslie, envoy for Illinois), one hun- 
dred and seventeen past masters, and the representatives of fifty lodges 
were present. 

We regret to notice that each brother mentioned is tagged with the 
number of his lodge, and are of the opinon that after a Mason has 
reached the distinction of grand master that it should no longer be 
necessary to speak of him as "M.W. Bro. John Jones (23)." 

The grand master, Henry J. Pugh, read his address, in which, after 
an eloquent exordium, he mentioned at some length the death of M.W. 
Bro. Thomas Robinson, who was grand master in 1897. 

In reference to dispensations he said : 

A number of special dispensations were granted by me during the 
year, a list of which will be duly presented for your information in the 
grand secretary's report. One only I felt obliged to refuse— a request to 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 121 



be permitted to wear regalia at a Masonic ball. I think it unnecessary 
to enter into an explanation of the reasons prompting me to this deci- 
sion, for they are shared by most, if not all, who have given the matter 
careful consideration. My worthy predecessors in the Grand East, for 
years back, have taken a like stand, and M.W. Bro. C. N. Bell, in his 
address to grand lodge in 1896, intimated that it should, by resolution, 
distinctly define its will in regard to this matter. This appeared to him 
desirable because of the number of applications constantly being made 
for this privilege, when it was urged that in other grand jurisdictions it 
was a common practice to issue dispensations for the wearing of regalia 
at balls and dancing parties. 

I am also of his opinion that a pronouncement by grand lodge, in the 
form of a resolution, would be the most satisfactory way of disposing 
of a question that is bound to recur yearly, and on which successive 
grand masters in this jurisdiction have consistently followed the same 
policy, by refusing permission to wear regalia at social functions of the 
nature mentioned. 

In marked contrast to the statements of other grand masters he said 
in regard to decisions and discipline : 

The absence of requests for decisions on points of Masonic law and 
practice would seem to indicate that the brethren generally are applying 
themselves to the study of such questions, and settling by research what 
was formerly submitted to the grand master. Another possible explan- 
ation is that in almost every lodge now there exists a coterie of earnest 
students, leaders in thought and activity, skilled in the noble art, and 
possessing an intimate knowledge of constitution and precedent, which 
renders them competent to interpret the law and settle for themselves 
vexed questions of form and procedure. Certainly my term has been 
singularly free in this respect, for with the exception of a few minor 
questions easily answered by reference to definite provisions contained 
in certain sections of the constitution, I have not been called upon for 
any ruling involving the solution of intricate problems. Happily also 
has been the total lack of cases rendering necessary disciplinary meas- 
ures, for not one single instance has occurred in the past year, and I 
consider this a matter for sincere rejoicement by the brethren through- 
out the jurisdiction. 

He complimented the district deputy grand masters in the following 
words : 

It is undoubtedly a fact, and acknowledged by all, that much of the 
success, prosperity and growth of the order throughout the jurisdiction, 
are due to the active zeal and unselfish labors of the brethren holding 
the positions of district deputy grand masters. They are called upon to 
give freely of their time and means in the performance of the duties of 
their offices, and cheerfully and conscientiously have they administered 
their high trusts, and justified the confidence reposed in them. As far 
as I have been able to learn this is true of all these brethren, and cer- 
tainly reflects credit on those responsible for the selection of the names 
at last grand lodge, for these high positions in the several Masonic dis- 
tricts. The reports that will be presented for your consideration in the 
course of the evening will serve to evince the great amount of energy 



122 APPENDIX PART I. 



and time that have been expended in visitations and other duties by 
these office-bearers, and which were necessary to successfully accomplish 
the mission for which they were elected. 

The district deputy grand masters are deserving of the commendation 
and thanks of this grand lodge, and I am sure all members feel deeply 
grateful to these brethren for the services rendered, and the sacrifices 
made by them for the good of the cause. 

He closed his address with the following quotation from Tom Moore, 
which, though written many years ago, never grows old : 

Let fate do her worst; there are relics of joy, 
Bright dreams of the past which she cannot destroy; 
Which come in the night time of sorrow and care 
And bring back the features that joy used to wear, 
Long, long, be my heart with such memories filled ! 
Like the vase in which roses have once been distilled, 
You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will, 
. But the scent of the roses will hang round it still. 

During the year three lodges were constituted and five instituted, 
indicating a continuous, though not rapid, growth in the jurisdiction. 

Telegrams were exchanged with the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, 
then in annual session. 

A handsome chain collar was presented Past Grand Master James 
Scroggie, and a similar present was made Past Grand Master S. P. 
Matheson, to replace one recently destroyed by fire. 

Grand Treasurer T. Harry Webb reported $5,355 in the charity fund 
and $17,850 in the investment account. In the current account the re- 
ceipts and balance amounted to $7,191; the expenditures were $5,709; 
and the balance $1,482. 

Grand Secretary James A. Ovas reported the net increase in mem- 
bership as 306, and the total membership 4,554. 

In the report of the grand librarian is mentioned the receipt of a 
bound copy of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Illinois from 
R.W. Bro. Isaac Cutter, grand secretary. 

The committee on jurisprudence and the committee on grievances 
and appeals had an exceedingly easy time, as no business of any de- 
scription came before them at this session. 

In the report of the committee on fraternal dead appears the name 
of Loyal L. Munn, past grand secretary of Illinois, who died Novem- 
ber 23, 1908. 

At the afternoon session of the second day the representatives of 
sister grand lodges were duly received and welcomed by the M.W. 
grand master, and fraternal greetings exchanged. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 123 

The committee on uniform work presented the following report, 
which, on motion, was received : 

First — That your committee have conferred with a large number of 
the members of long standing, in this grand lodge and of the lodges 
working either of the two systems of work, now authorized to be used 
in this jurisdiction. 

Second — That after full consideration we recommend that hereafter 
the Canadian work be the authorized work of this grand lodge, always 
providing, that all lodges now working the York work be confirmed in 
the perpetual use of the same. 

Third — That if this report be accepted by grand lodge, then before 
it shall become final law. it shall be confirmed at the next annual com- 
munication of grand lodge. 

Fourth — That provision shall also be made, that under any excep- 
tional circumstances arising, the M.W. the grand master, on the recom- 
mendation of the board of general purposes, may grant any new lodge 

the authority to use the York work. 

Of course, as the boy said, "it's none of our funeral." but as Horace 
Greeley once remarked in regard to the resumption of specie payments 
after the close of our civil war, "the way to resume, is to resume," and 
the way to have uniform work in a Masonic grand jurisdiction is for the 
grand lodge to adopt a standard work and insist on its constituent 
lodges using it. Just so long as lodges are permitted to use anything 
but the authorized ritual there will be a lack of uniformity, a condition 
that our northern brethren are evidently desirous of avoiding. 

There is no report on correspondence. 

James D. Baixe. of Boissevain, was elected grand master ; James 
A. Ovas, of Winnipeg, was re-elected grand secretary. 



MARYLAND, 1908. 

122xd Annual. Baltimore. November 17. 

The record of the 143rd semi-annual communication of the M.W". 
Grand Lodge of Maryland, which was held in I.O.O.F. temple, on Tues- 
day, May 12, 1908, is illustrated by cuts showing the ruins of the 
Masonic temple destroyed by fire January 17. 1908. and of the buildings 
occupied by the lodges till the completion of the new temple. 

Following the usual Maryland custom the grand lodge was opened 
in due form by Deputy Grand Master James R. Brewer, who ordered 



124 APPENDIX PART I. 



the grand marshal and his staff to proceed to the apartments of the 
grand master, M.W. Bro. Thomas J. Shryock, and escort him to the 
grand lodge room. His entrance was duly proclaimed, the grand hon- 
ors were accorded, the gavel duly tendered and the East assumed with 
becoming dignity. The "pomp and circumstance" having thus been 
properly observed, the grand lodge was ready for business. We are not 
yet old enough to feel competent to criticise any custom established by 
such a dignified, reverend and august body as the Grand Lodge of Mary- 
land, but we are just at the age when we are anxious to learn, and this 
prompts us to inquire why, in view of the fact that the grand lodge was 
closed in ample form (and of course by the grand master in person), it 
could not with equal propriety have been opened in ample form. What 
is there in the form at one end of the line that does not apply with equal 
force at the other end? We do not overlook the fact that the grand 
master is present in one case and does the job amply, while in the 
other case it is done duly by a lesser light, but what we want to know 
is, why should not the two ends of the job jibe? 

We extract the following from the address of Grand Master Shry- 
ock : 

I can assure you that it is with pleasure that I greet you at this 
semi-annual communication of the grand lodge, but regret that we are 
denied the pleasure of meeting in our own home, which, unfortunately, 
again was destroyed by fire on January 17. 

We are extremely fortunate in being able, by the kindness and dis- 
play of fraternity on the part of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
to meet in this most comfortable hall. 

The destruction of the temple by fire for the second time during my 
grand mastership is indeed a great calamity; but, fortunately, we were 
fully insured, and the loss to the fraternity will be only in the discom- 
fort of not having our own home for the meetings of our lodges in the 
city of Baltimore and for the grand lodge during the period of re- 
building. 

Whilst the destruction of the temple by fire and by water is prac- 
tically complete ; yet, owing to the splendid service of our fire depart- 
ment and the salvage corps, much of our furniture and all our records 
were saved, but the building was so thoroughly damaged by water, that 
the board of managers very wisely decided to erect it entirely new, with 
the exception of the walls and the front ; and, in order to take care of 
the future, will add another story. This will result in the enlargement 
of all our lodge rooms and in addition, give us a number of committee 
rooms and one additional large lodge room ; so that when the building 
is completed, it will be ample for the growth of the fraternity for the 
next twenty-five years. 

In addition to enlarging the temple, it will this time be erected as 
nearly fireproof as it is possible to make a building. The whole interior 
will be of steel and marble. The architects have practically eliminated 
all wood construction, so there will be nothing in the building to burn, 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 125 

with the exception of the furniture, and the possibility of a fire in the 
future will be reduced to a minimum. 

Resolutions were adopted authorizing the board of control to select 
plans, execute contracts and superintend the rebuilding, repairing and 
restoring the burned temple — they being required to submit full reports 
to a special auditing committee appointed by the grand master, who in 
turn must report to the grand lodge, thus keeping the whole subject 
within the control of the grand master and the grand lodge. 

The board of control was authorized to make a loan of $150,000 to 
carry out these purposes. 

Memorial windows were provided for in honor of Past Grand 
Secretary Jacob H. Medairy, and Past Grand Treasurer William Henry 
Shryock. 

At the 122nd annual communication, which was also held in the 
T.O.O.F. temple, on November 17, 190S, Deputy Grand Master James R. 
Brewer presided during the opening ceremonies and until Grand Master 
Shryock had been officially received and seated. 

The M.YV. grand master made an address in which he detailed the 
work that had been done on the temple in Charles street, and what 
was intended to be done in completing it. 

The grand secretary made a report showing the receipt and disburse- 
ment of $20,997.61 on general account. The board of managers reported 
the expenditure of $60,467.20 on account of reconstruction of the temple, 
with a balance on hand of $139,226.13. 

On recommendation of the committee on correspondence the Grand 
Lodge of Saskatchewan was recognized and given a cordial welcome 
into the fraternal circle of grand lodges. 

On motion of Past Grand Master Carter the following resolution 
was unanimously adopted : 

That the earnest, sincere and grateful acknowledgments of the 
Grand Lodge A.F. and A.M. of Maryland are tendered the Grand Lodge 
I.O.O.F. of Maryland for its generous proffer of its grand lodge room 
for our annual meeting when our own home was destroyed by fire. 

Also that the grateful thanks of the Grand Lodge A.F. and A.M. of 
Maryland are respectfully proffered to the ladies of the Queen Esther 
Rebecca Degree Lodge, I.O.O.F., for their elegant hospitality in enter- 
taining the craft at its annual convention. 

To show the method of conducting grand lodge elections in Mary- 
land we copy from the record : 

The hour for the election of grand officers having arrived Pasl 
Grand Master Carter was called to the chair. 



126 APPENDIX PART I. 



The requirements of the constitution in reference to the government 
of elections were then announced. 

Concordia Lodge No. 13 through Bro. George Cook placed in nom- 
ination for the office of grand master, M.W. Bro. Thomas J. Shryock, 
P.G.M. 

There being no other nominations Bro. Thomas J. Shryock, in ac- 
cordance with the constitutional provision governing the matter, was 
declared elected. 

Brother Carter surrendered the gavel to the grand master and he 
resumed his station and thanked the brethren for this 24th annual 
election. 

There was an emergent communication of the grand lodge held at 
Mount Washington, December 19, 1908, for the purpose of laying the 
qorner-stone of the Mt. Washington public school. The grand lodge 
was opened in form by R.W. Bro. Charles C. Homer, Jr., senior grand 
warden, who was specially deputized to preside. 

The report on correspondence (131 pp.) is the 22nd annual review 
from the pen of Edward T. Schultz, past senior grand warden. 

In the four pages which he gives to Illinois he reviews our proceed- 
ings at the session of 1907. He quotes from the opening portion of 
Grand Master Allen's address, giving statistics of our growth and what 
he says regarding the propensity to ask unnecessary questions, and adds : 

Unlike many grand masters, he had no suggestions, or recommenda- 
tions, looking to the enactment of new regulations, for which, we think, 
he is to be heartily commended. 

He makes several quotations from Brother Rob-bins' review of their 
proceedings and is generally in accord with his views. He differs with 
him, however, on his strictures of their regulation by which lodges de- 
linquent for dues are deprived of representation in grand lodge. On 
this head he says : 

"Self-preservation is the first law of nature." It requires money to 
conduct the affairs of a grand lodge, which is ordinarily only obtainable 
by the dues and assessments from the lodges. If one lodge is permitted 
to be derelict in its payment, others may claim the same privilege, and it 
might be that the grand lodge would be seriously embarrassed thereby. 
It seems therefore to us that some punishment, or denial of privilege, 
must be inflicted upon a lodge delinquent in payment of its dues. 

The full text^of our regulation on this subject is as follows: 
"The representatives of each lodge represented have, collectively, 
one vote, and the past masters of each lodge have, collectively, one vote. 
No lodge shall be entitled to a vote, either by its representatives or past 
masters, unless its dues to the grand lodge are fully paid or remitted." 

The rights and privileges of the members of the lodge are in no wise 
affected, nor are the representatives or past masters denied a seat or 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 127 



voice in grand lodge, nor, as we understand it, prevented from voting 
cm viva voce questions ; but that the representatives and past masters 
(the latter being under our constitution generously accorded equal rights 
with the representatives) are prohibited from voting upon questions 
etc., to be decided by a call of lodges. We should much like Bro. Robbins 
as well as other correspondents to inform us what is the procedure in 
their respective jurisdictions when a lodge fails to pay its dues and 
assessments. 

On the subject of a separate ballot for each degree Brother Robbins 
said that on inquiry he had found that in the original grand lodge, from 
its formation down to the present, there had been no deviation from the 
practice of one ballot for all the degrees. To this Bro. Schultz replies : 

Nothing that Brother Robbins has said upon this subject has shaken 
our faith in the declaration we have made, that prior to about the year 
1860, it was the universal rule and practice in all English-speaking grand 
lodges to require a separate ballot on each degree. The only way to 
settle this question is by a thorough examination of the regulations of 
grand lodges and the records of lodges; and if after such an examina- 
tion it can be ascertained that any considerable number of jurisdictions 
did not require a separate ballot on each degree, then and then only 
will we modify our declaration. 

When doctors disagree, especially upon a diagnosis involving his- 
torical facts, it is difficult for laymen to decide. 

Whatever may be true of the past, we can see no serious defect in 
the argument that one ballot should entitle a candidate to all there is in 
Ancient Craft Masonry, unless it can be shown after he has obtained a 
part that a mistake was made and that he should be excluded from the 
enjoyment of that part. What's the matter in this connection of the 
doctrine of "the whole or none?" 

In answer to the question as to treatment of lodges, delinquent in the 
payment of grand lodge dues, we quote the following from the Illinois 
law on the subject: "A representative of a constituent lodge is not 
entitled to mileage and per diem unless all grand lodge dues are fully 
paid." With us, this law brings the answer (and the cash) all right. 

Thomas J. Shryock, Baltimore, grand master; William M. Isaac, 
Baltimore, grand secretary. 



128 APPENDIX PART I. 



MASSACHUSETTS, 1908. 

175th Annual. Boston. December 29. 

We have before us the pamphlets containing reports of the proceed- 
ings of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for the year 1908, commencing 
with the quarterly of March 11 and ending with the annual of Decem- 
ber 29, and including in addition to the above the quarterlies of June 10, 
September 9 and December 9, and specials of March 21, May 6-30, June 
22, July 30, September 7-10, October 4-5, November 28, December 12-13, 
or a total of four quarterlies, one annual, and twelve special communica- 
tions, all of which were opened in ample form and presided over by 
M.W. Bro. John Albert Blake, grand master, whose attractive face in 
an excellent steel engraving adorns a page of the record. 

At the quarterly meeting of March 11th, twenty-five of the twenty- 
eight district deputy grand masters were present and the representatives 
of 162 lodges. 

Under the head of "Necrology," the grand master reported : 
At each quarterly communication the grand master is obliged to an- 
nounce the decease of one or more of our brethren who have been our 
beloved companions in years gone by. 

It is true that since our last communication this grand body has been 
unusually and severely afflicted by the loss of several of our most active 
officers and permanent members : R.W. Charles A. Welch, R.W. Per- 
cival L. Everett, R.W. Albert A. Folsom, R.W. Arthur T. Way, Bro. 
Eugene Van Rensselaer Thayer, W. Henry P. Brown, and W. John H. 
Swain. 

Appropriate memorials of each of these brethren were presented and 
are printed in the proceedings. 

We give place to the following interesting extracts from the records 
of this meeting: 

The recording grand secretary reminded the grand lodge that at the 
quarterly communication in December last he presented papers purport- 
ing to come from associations entitled a Grand Lodge of Greece and a 
Grand Orient of Argentina respectively, and asking recognition by this 
grand lodge. At the time these papers were presented it was intimated 
that it was doubtful whether the bodies so called were entitled even to 
respectful consideration. The documents were submitted by a young 
Greek, probably a recent arrival in this country, calling himself Ange 
Romeos and claiming to be a representative not only of the two bodies 
named, but also of several other foreign grand bodies. 

It had recently been learned that this person, becoming impatient at 
the delay in granting the desired recognition, had started a concern which 






MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 129 



he called "Haramon Lodge No. 143, under the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Orient of the Argentine Republic," associating himself in this scheme 
with divers and sundry other notorious, spurious and pretended Masons. 
Under these circumstances the application of this individual was evi- 
dently unworthy of consideration. 

Upon motion of the grand secretary the application for recognition of 
the associations named was accordingly refused and the craft were cau- 
tioned to have no Masonic communication whatever with the person 
calling himself Ange Romeos. 

Warning Against a Pretended Cipher. 

The recording grand secretary called the attention of the brethren to 
the circulars which had been persistently disseminated throughout the 
state by one Clark, a book-binder of Portland, Me., offering for sale a 
cheap publication purporting to be a cipher of our ritual. These circu- 
lars, containing extravagant declarations as to the correctness of this 
catch-penny affair, had apparently been mailed to every Mason in Massa- 
chusetts whose address the peddler could obtain. As he is not a Mason, 
his opinion as to the value of his wares is utterly worthless and they 
should be consigned to the waste-basket as soon as received. The only 
purchasers of such trash must be members of the fraternity whose curi- 
osity overcomes their sense of duty and their obligation to obey the 
positive and repeated requirements of the grand lodge to have nothing to 
do with such misleading helps. If the craft would let them alone it 
would not pay to issue them, and the brethren would so far be blessed 
with a good conscience. 

The following will be of interest outside of Massachusetts and the 
publication of the book will be eagerly awaited : 

R.W. Charles M. Green presented the following resolutions : 

In Grand Lodge, Boston, March 11, 1908. 
Resolved, That it is the duty of the grand jurisdiction of Free- 
masonry in Massachusetts, the oldest jurisdiction in this country, to 
cause to be prepared, as completely as possible, and published in endur- 
ing form, its Masonic history from colonial days to the present time. 

To that end it is 

Moved, That a committee on Masonic history, to consist of one able 
and discreet brother, and to be known as the historian of the Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts, be appointed by the most worshipful grand mas- 
ter to carry out the purpose of the resolution. 

And it is further 

Moved, That the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars be appropriated 
each year to defray the personal expenses of this committee or historian — 
subsequent provision to be made for publishing the history in such way 
and manner as may be determined by this grand lodge. 

The resolutions were unanimously adopted by a rising vote, with 
manifestation of much enthusiasm. The M.W. grand master then an- 
nounced that he believed it would be the general opinion of the fraternity 
that the brother best qualified for the duty proposed was the present re- 

—o 



130 APPENDIX PART I. 



cording grand secretary, and accordingly that appointment would be 
made ; therefore it now rested with that brother to decide whether he 
would undertake what it was hoped would be to him a welcome task. 

The attitude of the grand lodge upon the question of dealing with 
spurious and clandestine Masonry is illustrated in the following: 

W. Melvin M. Johnson made a report in behalf of the committee on 
legislation appointed at the quarterly communication in December last. 
The committee named by the M.W. grand master consisted of R.W. 
Charles T. Gallagher, W. Bros. Leon M. Abbott, Melvin M. Johnson, 
Horace T. Fogg and John K. Berry. On account of his absence from 
the city the committee was deprived of the assistance of R.W. Brother 
Gallagher. The other members of the committee prepared a petition, 
which was signed by Bro. Leon M. Abbott and presented in the senate 
by Bro. Allen T. Treadway. The accompanying bill, senate No. 187, was 
referred to the joint committee on the judiciary. Hearings before that 
committee were held on several days and attended by the members of 
the grand lodge committee and other officers and members of the grand 
lodge, as well as by representatives of other fraternal and secret organi- 
zations who rendered important assistance to your committee. Various 
amendments to the proposed bill were suggested, and as re-drafted it was 
reported to the House of Representatives March 10, 1908, in the follow- 
ing form : 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Eight. 

AN ACT 

Relative to the Fraudulent Use of the Name, Title or Common 

Designation of Fraternities, Societies and Unions. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 
Section 1. Whoever wilfully by color or aid of any false token or 
writing, or other false pretense or false statement, verbal or written, or 
without authority of the grand lodge or supreme governing lodge, coun- 
cil, union or other governing body hereinafter mentioned, obtains the 
signature of any person to any written application, or obtains any money 
or property for any alleged or pretended degree, or for any alleged or 
pretended secrets of or membership in any fraternity, association, so- 
ciety, order, organization or union having a grand lodge or supreme gov- 
erning lodge, council, union or other governing body in this state, or in 
any subordinate lodge or body thereof, shall be punished by imprison- 
ment for not more than three years or by a fine of not more than one 
thousand dollars or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

Section 2. Whoever in a newspaper or other publication, or in any 
written or printed letter, notice, matter or device, without authority of 
the grand lodge or supreme governing lodge, council, union or other 
governing body hereinafter mentioned, fraudulently uses or in any man- 
ner directly or indirectly aids in the use of the name, title or common 
designation of any fraternity, association, society, order or organization 
which has a grand lodge or supreme governing lodge, council, union or 
other governing body having priority in such use in this state, or any 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 131 



imitation of such name, title, or designation, or any name, title or des- 
ignation so nearly resembling such name, title or designation as to be 
calculated or liable to deceive ; and whoever without such authority pub- 
lishes, sells, lends, gives away, circulates or distributes any written or 
printed letter, notice, matter or device, directly or indirectly advertising 
for or soliciting members or applications for membership in such fa- 
ternity, association, society, order, organization or union, or in any al- 
leged or pretended association, society, order, organization or union using 
or designated or claimed to be known by such name, title or designation 
or imitation or resemblance thereof; and whoever therein or thereby of- 
fers to sell or to confer or to communicate or to give information di- 
rectly or indirectly where, how, of whom or by what means any alleged 
or pretended degrees or any alleged or pretended secret work or any al- 
leged or pretended secrets of such work or any alleged or pretended 
secrets of such fraternity, association, society, order, organization or 
union, or of any alleged or pretended association, society, order, organi- 
zation or union designated or claimed to be known by such name, title 
or designation or imitation or resemblance thereof can or may be ob- 
tained, conferred or communicated, shall be punished by imprisonment 
for not more than three years or by fine of not more than one thousand 
dollars or by both such fine and imprisonment. Any such written or 
printed letter, notice, matter or device shall be prima facie evidence of 
the fraudulent character of the scheme therein referred to and of an in- 
tent to violate this act. 

We should be glad to share in the confidence which our bay state 
brethren feel in the potency of legislation in the suppression of these 
fakir degree peddlers, but we are not convinced of the wisdom of so 
far dignifying them as to make it a question in state polity. There are 
some impostors who are flattered by attention of any sort, and there are 
some pests so constructed that if they cannot be chloroformed they 
would better be left severely alone — it leaves the air less noxious. 

The special communications of March 21, May 6 and May 30 were 
respectively for the purpose of participating in the celebration of the fif- 
tieth anniversary of Quaboag Lodge at Warren, a like occasion for Henry 
Price Lodge at Charleston, and to lay the corner-stone of a soldier's 
monument at Somerville. 

An incident occurring at the latter seems to us worth recording, as 
it may be the prelude to some action on the part of our Massachusetts 
brethren looking to the further extension of their liberality in the mat- 
ter of official recognition so as to include the G.A.R. : 

An interesting feature of the occasion was the presentation by the 
grand master of the trowel he had used to his honor, the mayor of 
Somerville, W. Bro. Charles A. Grimmons, who in turn presented it to 
Thomas Murphy, commander of Willard C. Kingsley Post, No. 139, 
G.A.R. , who had assisted in its use and who accepted the implement with 
thanks and the assurance that his post would sacredly preserve it as a 
valued souvenir of the occasion. 



132 APPENDIX PART I. 



At the quarterly communication of June 10th there were present in 
addition to a complete roster of grand lodge officers, twenty-two district 
deputy grand masters, twenty-nine permanent members in the person of 
past grand masters, past deputy grand masters and past grand wardens, 
and the representatives of 166 lodges. 

Under the head of "Contributions to the Curiosities of the Craft" is 
the following record : 

The M.W. grand master presented the pen with which the lieutenant 
governor signed the act passed by the general court "Relative to the 
Fraudulent Use of Names, Titles or Common Designations of Fraterni- 
ties, Societies and Unions," being set forth in full in the printed pro- 
ceedings of this grand lodge for March last. 

It was voted that the pen be deposited in the repository for such rel- 
ics and that the thanks of the grand lodge be returned to W. Bro. Allen 
T. Treadway, who presented to the state senate the petition for the act 
and to whom we are indebted for the presentation of the instrument 
with which the enactment was signed. 

The special communication of June 22 was to assist in celebrating the 
fiftieth anniversary of Montacute Lodge at Worcester. 

The special of July 30th placed the corner-stone of a church at Maiden 
An address was delivered by R.W. Bro. Dana J. Flanders, past grand 
warden, from which we append a brief extract: 

It may be a matter of curiosity, and perhaps wonderment, to some of 
those present today to account for the presence of the representatives of 
this fraternity for the purpose of laying the corner-stone of this, our lat- 
est addition to the Christian churches of our city, and for their informa- 
tion or enlightenment I may say that from time immemorial it has been 
the practice to call upon these representatives to set this public mark of 
their approval upon the beginning of public buildings of all kinds, and 
particularly upon churches, which are the embodiment of the principles 
upon which our civilization rests. 

In former times the members of the guilds or associations of Masons 
not only designed the buildings and laid the foundations, but their mem- 
bers wrought in the quarries where the stones were raised and completed 
the edifice from corner-stone to turret or spire. That there is something 
more than tradition for such claims, history, both scriptural and profane, 
proclaims in innumerable cases, but perhaps more conclusive evidence is 
shown in the fact that the location of the ruins of the most ancient struc- 
tures furnish evidence of the masters who not only contrived the fabrics 
which immortalized them, but with mallet and chisel and square and 
plumb really did the work which our operative Mason does today, and 
left their marks of identification upon every stone. 

At the special of September 7th the fiftieth anniversary of Trinity 
Lodge at Clinton was celebrated. 

At the quarterly communication of September 9th the usual quota of 
grand lodge officers appeared, also twenty-five district deputy grand 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 133 

masters, thirty-one permanent members and the representatives of 115 
lodges. The resignation of Past Grand Master Sekeno D. Nickersox, 
who for many years held the office of recording grand secretary, was re- 
ceived and he was appointed as a committee on Masonic history. This 
appointment was received with enthusiasm and by it a most complete and 
satisfactory performance of the work in hand is assured. 

R.YV. Bro. Thomas W Davis was installed as recording grand sec- 
retary vice Brother Nickerson, resigned. 

The fiftieth anniversary of Webster Lodge was celebrated at the spe- 
cial communication of the grand lodge held September 10. 

The special of October 4th was for the purpose of attending the re- 
ligious services inaugurating the celebration of the one hundred and 
seventy-fifth anniversary of St. John's Lodge. 

There were in attendance, in addition to a complete line of grand 
lodge officers, ten district deputy grand masters and twenty permanent 
members of the grand lodge, including four past grand masters ; also 
the following distinguished visitors, as guests of St. John's Ledge : R.YV. 
George B. Orlady, G.M. of Pennsylvania: M.W. James L. Michie. 
G.M. of South Carolina; M.W. Frederick W. Sawyer. G.M. of New 
Hampshire: M.W. S. Nelson Sawyer. G.M. of New York: M.W. 
Charles R. Smith. G.M. of Nova Scotia: M.W. Joseph W. Egglestox. 
G.M. of Virginia; M.W. William L. Chattertox. G.M. of Rhode 
Island; M.W. Thomas J. Shryock. G.M. of Maryland; M.W. Edward 
E. Fuller. G.M. of Connecticut: M.W. Samuel M. Gattis. G.M. of 
North Carolina; M.W. William D. Wolfskeil. G.M. ci Xew Jersey; 
M.W. Thomas J. Day. G.M. of Delaware: M.W. Edmund B. Mallett. 
G.M. of Maine; M.W. Lee S. Tillotsox. G.M. of Vermont; R.W. 
Thomas Mowbray, G.S. of Nova Scotia; R.W. Alrert H. Hunter, 
P.D.D.G. Master of Maine. 

After the grand lodge had been opened in ample form : 
The master of St. John's Lodge. Wor. Bro. Leonard G. Roberts, was 
introduced and extended a formal invitation to the grand lodge to pro- 
ceed under the escort of St. John's Lodge to Tremont Temple to take 
part in the religious service of the day. The grand master responded in 
acceptance of the invitation, and * * * the procession moved by the way 
of Lafayette Mall and Tremont street to Tremont Temple, reversing the 
order after passing Winter street, so that the grand master and master 
of the lodge entered the building first, followed by the other invited 
guests. 

The visiting grand masters were given seats upon the platform at the 
right and left of the grand master, the master of the lodge, the chaplains 
and the preacher oi the day; the other brethren who hail participated in 
the procession occupied the central part of the main rioor. the remainder 
of the great auditorium being already rilled to overflowing by members 
of the craft and ladies. 



134 APPENDIX PART I. 



There was a full religious program of instrumental and vocal music, 
scripture reading, prayer and sermon, the latter by Rev. Bro. John W. 
Hamilton, D.D. L.L.D., bishop of the M. E. church. We quote the an- 
niversary hymn written by Mrs. John C. Hurll: 

How rich is the past, with the treasures untold 
Of sacred tradition, and memories old; 
We sing of the blessings which crowned every day, 
The God of our Fathers has led all the way — 
The God of our Fathers has led all the way. 

We sing of the fellowship faithful and true 
Which draws us together our vows to renew, 
The present is with us to shape as we will, 
The God of our Fathers is leading us still — ■ 
The God of our Fathers is leading us still. 

The future is calling: press on to the light, 

Oh, splendid the vision which dawns on our sight ; 

With high aspiration our way to attend, 

The God of cur Fathers will lead to the end — 

The God of our Fathers will lead to the end. 

The past is our glory, the present our pride, 
The future awaits us with portals flung wide, 
What more can we ask, as we gratefully sing, 
God rules in his heaven, and is ever our King — 
God rules in his heaven, and is ever our King. 

The special communication of October 5th was to attend the Masonic 
exercises of the celebration of the one hundred and seventy-fifth an- 
niversary of St. John's Lodge, the attendance being practically the same 
as on the previous day, and the exercises consisting of singing, addresses 
of welcome and history, and recollections of some distinguished members 
of St. John's Lodge by Sereno D. Nickerson, past grand master. The 
record says : 

The exercises of the celebration were continued by a banquet in the 
evening at which addresses were made by the several grand masters, and 
by an entertainment and collation on the evening of October 6, at which 
the members and guests of the lodge with their ladies were most hos- 
pitably entertained. 

A conference of the grand master and other past and present officers 
of the grand lodge with the visiting grand masters was held at the Al- 
gonquin club on Tuesday, October 6, upon the invitation of the grand 
master, the ladies accompanying the visitors being entertained at the 
same time and place by Mrs. Blake and others. 

The conference had as its object the discussion of certain matters in 
which the various jurisdictions have a common interest, and is believed 
to have been of benefit to the craft. 

The special of November 28th was held at Marion and was for the 
purpose of laying the corner-stone of a new building for the occupancy 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 



of Pythagorean Lodge. The program usual to such occasions was car- 
ried out. 

At the quarterly communication of December 9th the grand lodge was 
opened in ample form, the usual line of grand officers being present. 
There were also in attendance twenty-five district deputy grand masters, 
fifty-one permanent members and the representatives of 203 lodges. 

R.YV. Bro. Charles T. Gallagher, on behalf of the committee upon 
the application of the Grand Lodge of France for recognition, made a 
very full, interesting and instructive report, giving much information, 
which, if space permitted, we should be glad to give our readers. The 
conclusion was that neither the ritual nor constitution of the body makes 
such acknowledgment of God, nor requires such use of the Bible as are 
essential to constitute a valid claim to recognition and that their appli- 
cations must therefore be refused, and the report was unanimously con- 
curred in by the grand lodge. 

In the address of the grand master he reports the trial, conviction and 
fining of an offender under the recently enacted law providing for pro- 
tection against the introduction of spurious Masonry. This law is quoted 
in a previous page of this review and appears to start off successfully in 
spite of our misgivings. 

The election of officers occurred at this communication and was pre- 
ceded by a report from the recording grand secretary, showing the total 
number of votes that might be cast was 657. For grand master 493 votes 
were cast, 492 of which were for the brother chosen. 

The special of December 12th was at Peabody, for the purpose of as- 
sisting in the celebration of the centennial of Jordan Lodge, and the 
special of the following day (Sunday) was to attend divine worship in 
connection with said celebration. 

The annual communication occurred December 29th and was for the 
purpose of installing the grand officers and celebrating the feast of 
St. John, the evangelist. After the usual ceremonies of installation and 
the routine business had been transacted, the craft were called from labor 
to refreshment at 6:10 p. m. and proceeded to the banquet hall, where 
the feast of St. John the evangelist was celebrated in due and ancient 
form (whatever that may be), and at 10:50 the brethren were again 
called to labor and the grand lodge closed in ample form. There is a 
complete report of the speeches made at the banquet, each of which and 
all of which are so good that we would gladly quote, but refrain from 
beginning because we should not know where to stop, and we have al- 
ready given the bay state more than its proportion of space. 



136 APPENDIX PART I. 



There is no report on correspondence, and as we have no remembrance 
>of seeing any explanation of the absence of such reports from the Mas- 
sachusetts proceedings we are at a loss to know whether the omission 
is because they don't want to correspond with their neighbors, or be- 
cause of the clammy feeling that they don't correspond to (or resemble) 
other people, or simply because they are like the boy who "didn't have 
to." 

Dana J. Flanders, Maiden, grand master; Thomas W. Davis, Ma- 
sonic Temple, Boston, grand secretary. 



MICHIGAN, 1909. 

65th Annual. Detroit. May 25. 

The grand lodge was opened in ample form at high twelve by M.W. 
Grand Master Herbert Montague, and his associate grand officers. 

The grand secretary announced that the Craftsmen's Club of Ann 
Arbor, would give an entertainment in the auditorium of the Masonic 
temple at 8 o'clock in the evening, consisting of a representation of an 
eighteenth century lodge ; also that a photographer would be in wait- 
ing to take a picture of the officers and members of the grand lodge 
in front of the Masonic temple immediately upon the grand lodge closing 
for recess. The grand ledge then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. m. 

The record of the afternoon session opens with a "roll of honor," 
containing the names of forty past grand masters who have passed to 
the great beyond — an addition of only one (Hugh McCurdy) during 
the year. 

Fourteen past grand masters were present and forty-seven members 
of the diplomatic corps, Bro. Arthur M. Hume responding for Illinois. 
Number of chartered lodges represented 398. Total registered attend- 
ance 577. We clip an extract from the opening portion of the grand 
master's address : 

Since last we met in annual convention, we have seen the seed-time 
and the harvest. The Great Architect, in His supreme and generous 
goodness, has showered His blessings upon us ; and abundance and plenty 
have greeted us on every hand. The flowers have bloomed, and given 
their beauty to please and encourage us ; the birds have given forth 
their notes of love and sweetness upon the air to entertain us, and turn 
our thoughts towards Him, who sitteth upon the throne; the land- 
scapes have been painted in the rich, warm tints of summer, and winter 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 137 

has clothed them in its icy mantle ; and thus are we taught the great 
lessons of life, and of the resurrection to that new life beyond the 
golden glow of our ripening years, and which will follow with the 
bursting of the bud and the unfolding leaf. 

In obedience to our laws, and in harmony with the glorious prin- 
ciples of the institution we love and venerate, we are gathered in this 
annual reunion. Again we assemble around our common altar, while 
our most esteemed and honored grand chaplain voices our adoration 
and praise to the Supreme Architect of the Universe for his watchful 
care over us and ours during the year that has passed, and adds a prayer 
for a continuance of His love and protection through succeeding years. 

He reports the placing of nine corner-stones, and the dedication of 
eighteen lodge halls or temples, also that he issued six dispensations for 
new lodges. 

At this point we interrupt the current record by a reference to the 
illustrations contained in the volume under review, and to make a some- 
what extended extract from the grand master's address, explaining the 
presence of one of the embellishments (or shall we call it a blemish?), 
and embodying what may be regarded as a semi-official and admittedly 
needed defense of what had recently occurred in a neighboring juris- 
diction. The fly-leaf presents a tinted half-tone of the pleasant visage 
of Arthur M. Hume, the grand master-elect. From personal knowl- 
edge we can testify that the picture is a good likeness. Opposite to it 
is a page of eleven vignettes of grand lodge officers, followed by a 
biographical sketch of M.W. Bro. Hume. 

Then comes a full-page illustration which might, in our opinon, have 
been omitted, thereby bringing far more credit to those responsible for 
its insertion. There are several full length figures in the group and 
many heads and faces peeking through the crevices. First, comes the 
grand master with his official apron and jewel well to the front, ram- 
pant as it were. Second in prominence is a lady whose muff and a 
huge bouquet supply the place of apron and jewel, and then come her 
husband, a senator of the U. S. (whose overcoat and mittens do not 
proclaim his affiliation, though the record is careful to say that he is a 
Mason), the grand secretary, grand marshal, grand tyler, etc., on none 
of whose faces do we see any evidence that self-satisfaction is dormant. 

When we look at this picture and read the following extract from 
the grand master's address or explanation as already referred to. our 
tongue burns and our lingers tingle to say something so strong that it 
might appear un fraternal. We will content ourselves, however, by 
merely inquiring where was the dignity of the time-honored, and ancient 
institution when its modern exponents were seeking political or social 
prestige in this glaringly toadyish fashion, and if there needed to be a 



138 APPENDIX PART I. 



"woman in the case" where were all the mothers, wives, sisters and 
daughters of Wolverine Masons, that none could be found to answer 
the demand? 

But let us hear what the grand master says of the occasion, and then 
ask ourselves seriously whether it was a "a good thing for our order," 
and whether the Cincinnati function was any credit to the fraternity : 

CORNER-STONE LAYING AT GRAND RAPIDS. 

For some reasons I have thought it best to make separate and par- 
ticular mention of the corner-stone laying of the new federal building 
at Grand Rapids. 

Sometime in the early part of last December, I received from the 
Pastmasters' Association of Grand Rapids, an invitation for the grand 
lodge to lay the corner-stone of the new post office building, in that 
city. I, of course, accepted, and expected to perform the ceremony 
about the middle of December. 

When the stone arrived it was found to be defective, and so was re- 
jected — and then the matter was postponed. In the meantime, some 
criticism was made as to the Masonic grand lodge performing this cere- 
mony,' and they, therefore, quietly stepped aside, and we thought no 
more of it ; but the hustling Masons of Grand Rapids were not satisfied, 
and quietly took steps to overcome the opposition, and again, in the 
early part of February, last, the grand lodge was invited to perform the 
ceremony of corner-stone laying, to take place on February 12. 

Our good Masonic brother, Senator William Alden Smith, came on 
to Grand Rapids to be present for this and other occasions, and with 
him came Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Longworth — Mrs. Longworth, the 
daughter of our then president of the United States (Theodore Roose- 
velt) — a lady much traveled, and ever in the public eye, and greatly ap- 
preciated by the people. 

I was asked if it would be possible for us to give to Mrs. Longworth 
some portion of the ceremony to perform, and I immediately said it 
would be possible, and that we would be glad, indeed, to honor and be 
honored by the president's daughter. It was accordingly arranged for, 
and Mrs. Longworth used the grand master's trowel to spread some 
cement, and used his golden gavel to give the three distinct knocks upon 
the corner-stone after it was in place. Thus was the Grand Lodge of 
Michigan assisted in the ceremony of corner-stone laying by the daugh- 
ter of the president, whom all of the grand lodge officers were pleased 
to recognize as a most delightful and engaging young lady. 

The crowd of people attendant upon this occasion was immense, and 
the enthusiasm was most gratifying, and I believe this incident was a 
good thins for our order. 

TRIP TO CINCINNATI. 

Having received — aside from the regular and official invitation of the 
Grand Lodge of Ohio to be present in Cincinnati on February 18, on the 
occasion of the conferring of the three degrees in Blue Lodge Masonry 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 139 



upon President-Elect William Howard Taft — a personal and urgent in- 
vitation from the grand master of Ohio. I concluded to accept, and ac- 
cordingly went to Cincinnati, to see what was meant by conferring the 
degrees at sight. I saw how it was done, and was greatly interested in 
the meeting. 

Louis Kossuth (the great Hungarian) said: "If all men were Free- 
masons, what a world-wide and glorious republic we should have." The 
president of this great republic has been made a Mason, and has given 
new emphasis to the favorable opinion of the fraternity held by many 
of his predecessors in the high office to which he has been called. 

George Washington (first president of the United States"), was a 
Mason, and said : "I shall always be happy to advance the interest of 
the society, and to be considered by them a deserving brother.''' Only 
one president of the United States (John Quincy Adams) has opposed 
Freemasonry. His father (John Adams) had a very different opinion 
of the society. President Roosevelt received the Entered Apprentice 
and Fellow Craft degrees in 1901. before he was inaugurated as vice- 
president, and received the Master degree during the same year. Presi- 
dent McKinley received the degrees of the Blue Lodge in Hiram Lodge. 
at Winchester. Virginia, in 1S63. 

In seeking to become a Mason. Judge William H. Taft had such 
examples as those of his own brothers, of his father, of his two im- 
mediate predecessors, of Washington, of Andrew Jackson, and the fa- 
vorable opinion of hundreds of the best, wisest and ablest men among 
the nations of the earth. Before he was nominated for the presidency. 
Secretary Taft expressed a desire to become a Mason, and really made 
application of his own free will and accord. The proper initial steps 
were taken to make him a Mason at sight — which, by the way is a mis- 
nomer and a misleading term, as applied to the ceremonial actually used 
— and Bro. William B. Melish (an eminent Mason of Ohio, and a past 
grand master of the grand lodge of that state). Levi C. Goodale (an- 
other past grand master), and Jacob H. Bromwell (grand secretary of 
the Grand Lodge of Ohio), joined in a petition addressed to Charles S. 
Hoskinson (grand master of the Grand Lodge of Masons of the State 
of Ohio), asking that the three degrees conferred in the Blue Lodge 
might be given to William Howard Taft. and that he might be made a 
Mason at sight. In this petition it was shown to the grand master that 
Mr. Taft had been compelled, by official business, to be absent from his 
home in Ohio for a Ion? time, and that this had interferred with his ini- 
tiation into the fraternity, etc. The grand master (as he had a perfect 
right to do), granted the petition, and appointed the three petitioning 
brethren a committee of arrangements. 

On the evening of February 18, 1900. i n the Scottish Rite Cathedral. 
Cincinnati. Ohio. William Howard Taft. first citizen of the republic, 
was made a Mason. A numerous and distinguished company of Masons, 
hailing from many states of the Union, were present. The cathedral 
was crowded with brethren who were anxious to see the ceremonies. 
The grand masters of twenty states were in attendance, and many of 
the highest officials of the other Masonic bodies. 

About an hour was consumed in the work. The candidate made a 
Mason at sight was obligated in all the three decrees, was instructed in 



140 APPENDIX PART I. 



the "Arcana," heard the same charge that his father had delivered to 
his brothers, and received a certificate that he was in good and regular 
standing as a Freemason. But not only did he "go through" himself in' 
this way, but he afterwards saw the degree of Master Mason conferred 
in full form on a candidate by Kilwinning Ledge. 

After the president-elect received the degrees, he advanced to the 
edge of the stage and addressed those present as "My brothers," and 
going to his brother, by blood, shook hands with him. He had become 
"bound to him by a double tie." 

The constitution of the Grand Lodge of Ohio declares of the grand 
master that it is his prerogative to make Masons at sight, and for this 
purpose he may summon to his assistance such brethren as he may deem 
necessary. Grand Master Hoskinson had the right and power to make 
Mr. Taft a Mason at sight, and he exercised it. This is not the first 
instance of making a Mason at sight in this country. Governor Asa S. 
Bushnell, of Ohio, was made a Mason at sight by the grand master of 
the Grand Lodge of Ohio, under the same constitutional provisions to 
which I have referred. This was in 1892, and no protests were made. 

Governor Lloyd Lowndes, of Maryland, was made a Mason at sight 
by Grand Master Thomas J. Shryock. Grand masters in Pennsylvania 
have made two judges — Pennypacker and Gordon — and at least one other 
prominent citizen (John Wanamaker) Masons at sight. It is said thai: 
the power has not been exercised in New York since 1867, when Grand 
Master Holman exercised the prerogative. 

Brother Taft, made a Mason at sight, must still pass the "scrutiny 
of the ballot," for he must affiliate, and there is a ballot provided for 
on such occasions. 

When the whole matter has been narrowed down to the smallest 
compass, it practically means that President Taft made application 
through three prominent Masons, to be made a Mason; that, recognizing 
the fact that it would be wholly impracticable to initiate him in the 
usual manner, they invoked the clear prerogative of the grand master, 
and arranged that he be made a Mason at sight. In substance, it seems 
all the laws of the fraternity were complied with, excepting the time 
limit, which was waived under a dispensation, as is often done. 

I enjoyed the meeting greatly, and met, personally, a number of the 
prominent Masons of our land ; I was very glad that I attended. It 
was my particular good fortune to have with me on this trip my good 
friend and brother, your senior grand deacon (James H. Thompson), 
and I believe he felt well paid for the trip, and I am sure we both left 
Cincinnati feeling that it is a particularly good place to go. 

In his notice of deaths in other grand jurisdictions the grand master 
mentions the passing of R.W. Bro. Loyal L. Munn, our own well- 
beloved past grand secretary. He gives a touching description of the 
alarming illness of M.W. Bro. Lou B. Winsor, grand secretary, and the 
extraordinary and fortunately effective efforts to restore him. The 
grand master proved himself loving in impulse and brave in execution. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 141 

He reports the collection of one hundred and sixty-five dollars for 
special dispensations to confer degrees out of time, to elect officers at 
other than regular dates, etc., and joins in the usual protest against the 
practice. In Illinois it has been found by experience that the extraor- 
dinary occasions for hurry-up degrees decreased just in proportion as 
the fees for dispensations to authorize them increased. Under the head 
of decisions, he says that while he was called upon to answer hundreds of 
letters and questions he was able to give such answers and make such 
explanations as to avoid rendering a single new decision. 

From the report of the superintendent of the Michigan Masonic 
Home, we find that the weekly average cost of each beneficiary was $3.76. 

The special committee on change in monitorial work made a report 
which was adopted, changing ''avocations" to "vocations" in the moni- 
torial paragraph on the twenty-four inch gauge. We are interested to 
learn that through official action Michigan has sanctioned a change which 
the compiler of our Standard Monitor made years ago without any 
special authority, save that the meaning of the words manifestly de- 
manded it. 

The committee on jurisprudence to whom was referred the Tennes- 
see address on the subject of cipher rituals, made the following report, 
which was adopted, thus proving anew that "Ephraim is joined to his 
idols," even though they be wooden images on rotten bases : 

Your committee on jurisprudence, to whom was referred the address 
by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Tennessee relative to the use 
of cipher rituals, have had the same under consideration, and beg leave 
to_ report as follows : We are of the opinion that the ideal way to trans- 
mit the work of the several degrees would be by oral tradition, if the 
same could be done with safety and accuracy, but we believe, in view of 
the experience of this grand lodge on this same subject, that the present 
system in use in this grand jurisdiction is the best and safest, and con- 
duces to the best work of any system yet adopted, and we therefore, with 
all due deference to the views of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of 
Tennessee, recommend the retention by this grand lodge of the system 
now in use in this grand jurisdiction. 

The report on correspondence (271 pp.) is by Grand Secretary Lou 
B. Winsor, past grand master. Reviewing the Illinois proceedings of 
1908— to which he gives six of his well-considered pages— he speaks in 
laudatory terms of the work of our correspondent, M.W. Brother Rob- 
bins, and pays him a very high compliment by quoting largely from his 
report in which various peculiarities in Michigan's methods are frankly 
criticised. No defense is undertaken. 

Arthur M. Hume, Owosso, grand master; Lou B. Winsor, F.G.M.. 
Reed City, grand secretary. 



142 APPENDIX PART I. 



MINNESOTA, 1909. 

56th Annual. St. Paul. January 20. 

The wholesome face of M.W. Bro. William P. Roberts, grand mas- 
ter, appears in half-tone on the fly-leaf of the Minnesota proceedings 
for 1909. 

The grand lodge met in St. Paul, January 20, 1909, and was opened 
in ample form by Grand Master Roberts, assisted by the full quota of 
grand lodge officers, except the junior grand steward. 

Two hundred and thirty lodges out of the two hundred and forty- 
eight on the roll, were represented. There were also present twelve 
past grand masters, one each senior and junior grand warden, twenty- 
five district deputy grand masters, and thirty-five members of the dip- 
lomatic corps, the latter including M.W. Bro. A. T. Stebbins, the rep- 
resentative of Illinois. 

A visitor was announced in the person of M.W. Bro. Nathan C. 
Griffin, past grand master of Wisconsin, whereupon the grand master 
directed all past grand masters present to retire and escort him into 
the hall, where he was appropriately received. 

After the appointment of the usual committees the grand master 
read his address, which the committee on grand master's address char- 
acterize as "profound and exhaustive." Whether these are exactly the 
correct adjectives or not can be decided only by a careful reading of 
its forty-eight pages, fourteen of which are devoted to recording, ex- 
plaining and discussing his eighty-three decisions, and five of which are 
given to telling why he favored the recognition of the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico. 

As the committee on jurisprudence concurred in a blanket approval 
of all his decisions and the committee on ancient landmarks agreed 
with him on Mexico, and both reports were adopted by the grand lodge, 
it is fair to conclude that his decisions must have been in accord with 
the Masonic laws of Minnesota and his arguments convincing to his 
hearers, whatever may be true as to the laws and among the Masons of 
other jurisdictions. 

We are glad to note that a committee is engaged in revising the Min- 
nesota code, and presumably some changes will be made on points with 
which the grand master wrestled and along lines which we should 
surely advocate were we a constituent of that grand lodge, notably in 
the matter of peremptory objection previous to ballot, the right of a 
lodge to waive jurisdiction over residents within its boundaries, and the 
alleged right of the grand lodge to decide the question of waiver. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 143 



On the subject of recognizing the Grand Lodge Valle de [Mexico, 
we make some extracts from the grand master's address as follows : 

An examination of recent proceedings of the Grand Lodge Valle de 
Mexico, indicates conscientious, conservative management as well as 
leadership. Our Masonic authorites lay down certain conditions which 
practically are insisted upon as conditions precedent to the recognition of 
a new grand lodge. In 1905, a special committee of the Grand Lodge of 
Michigan laid down the following conditions, as necessary to be met: 

1. The grand lodge seeking recognition must have been regularly 
organized, and in that organization the ancient landmarks, constitutions 
and usages must have been substantially followed. 

* * * * * * 

Michigan withheld recognition that year, but subsequently, in 1907, 
after a visit to that country by the chairman of its foreign correspond- 
ence committee, its grand secretary, accorded such recognition. It found 
practical conditions there were such as regular Masons could afford to 
recognize, though there zuas no pretense that the first condition in the 
report of 1905, above stated, could be anszwered technically and af- 
firmatively. But it did find, I understand, that lodges there all observe 
today the ancient landmarks, constitutions and usages of regular Ma- 
sonry, that the Holy Bible is always upon the altars when the lodges are 
at labor, that belief in the existence of God is required, that women are 
not made Masons, nor permitted to visit their lodges. 

* * * * >K * 

The Scottish Rite no longer permits the three degrees of Symbolic 
Masonry to be conferred by its bodies in that territory, and the sub- 
ordinate lodges, of the Valle de Mexico, do not practice, control or have 
any connection with any other than the three symbolic degrees, in any 
other way than does this grand lodge perhaps, in its resolutions of 1890 
defining what Masonic societies it recognizes as legitimate — if indeed so 
much. There may be a possible rival in that territory, in the so-called 
Grand Lodge of Vera Cruz, but I do not suspect the latter possesses 
any symptoms of regularity which we need consider a moment. 

* * * * * * 

Shall Minnesota, then, still insist, with some of our sister grand 
lodges, that the first condition laid down in the Michigan report of 1905 
also must be literally and technically complied with, before according 
recognition to Valle de Mexico? If so, I am frank to say that it is 
more than doubtful — is wholly improbable — that the condition can ever 
be met, or that regular Masonry from that standpoint, at least, will ever 
exist in Valle de Mexico. 

****** 

The able brethren of our sister jurisdictions, who insist upon literal 
genealogy, have, so far as I have discovered, done little more in the 
way of disnuting the claims of Valle de Mexico to legitimacy, than to 
express a doubt, and throw some "Scottish Rite'' dust into the contro- 
versy. I shall not attempt to prove legitimacy. 

****** 

As a practical man and Mason, I want regular recognizable Masonry 
in Mexico, because in mv judgment the best interests of our whole 
fraternity, and especially those of hundreds of our brethren in Mexico, 
demand "it. If we must wait upon technical proof of regularity, and the 
production of charters, or of a regular genealogy back to York. 1717, 
there will never be any regular Masonry there to recognize. 



144 APPENDIX PART I. 



These extracts clearly show that the grand master bases his argument 
for recognition upon recent or present conditions, and that he fully ad- 
mits the illegitimate origin of the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico. 

In making this admission it seems to us that he concedes the whole 
case, and leaves himself no ground to stand upon. When the founda- 
tion is wanting or rotten the structure is insecure and cannot stand. 
Masonry lays much stress upon fundamentals and insists that its vo- 
taries, whether as individuals or bodies, shall start right. In individuals 
it takes account of birth, requiring that its votaries shall be of the male 
sex, free-born, descended from honest parents (i. e. of legitimate birth), 
and congenitally of whole physique. 

The person who is unfortunate enough to lack these qualifications is 
effectually debarred from the privileges of Freemasonry, although he 
is no wise personally responsible for the defect, nor is there any way 
through which these disqualifications can be removed. It is equally true 
that a lodge must start right and be legitimately born, in order to have 
regular standing in Masonry under the grand lodge plan. It is as im- 
possible to wipe out the defect in case of the lodge as it is in the indi- 
vidual, and a legitimate grand lodge can be formed from none but 
lodges of regular birth. We hear more or less about some healing pro- 
cess, but healing, if it ever has any proper function, can be applied only 
to irregularities and not to fundamentals. Besides, when this balm is 
applied it must be by some factor outside of and of higher standing 
than the patient. 

Where is the power outside of and higher than itself that can ad- 
minister the remedy to a sovereign grand lodge? 

To argue that because the constituents of the Grand Lodge Valle de 
Mexico have discontinued some (or even all) of their admittedly dis- 
creditable practices and that, therefore, they can now be recognized, is 
to argue that the clandestine lodges established by the colored people 
or by the malcontents who have, sundered themselves from legitimate 
grand lodges, are now all right and recognizable because they acknowl- 
edge a Supreme Being, use all of the three great lights, refuse to ini- 
tiate women, and in other things conform to regular methods. Loyalty 
to the fundamental teachings of Masonry, obedience to obligations, the 
convictions of conscience and every consideration of logic and reason, 
as well as the promise which every master makes at his installation, 
compel the conclusion that the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico must be 
born again and start de novo to receive recognition. Considerations of 
sentiment, of social enjoyment, of business relations, and a desire to 
give countenance to the position of so-called higher bodies already es- 
tablished there, should have no weight in determining the attitude of 
Masonry towards such claimants. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 145 

The argument that because a number of the grand lodges of the 
U.S. and other grand jurisdictions have recognized the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico may mean only that they have not sufficiently exam- 
ined the situation, and is of no more value than would be an argument 
claiming that a bogus dollar should continue to circulate because it had 
passed through a number of hands. 

If Missouri instead of withdrawing the charter of Toltec Lodge (the 
only legitimate lodge that ever existed in Mexico), had granted charters 
to two other lodges, a regular grand lodge might have bee,n organized 
and the question would have been settled Masonically and along the 
only line in which it can ever be properly adjusted. 

The grand master recommended the establishment of a modern card 
index system, that provision be made for paying the expenses of the 
grand secretary in attending the laying of corner-stones and other grand 
lodge ceremonials, that a suitable case for the carriage of regalia be 
purchased, that an American flag be bought for the use of the grand 
lodge, that more commodious quarters be provided for the grand lodge, 
and that the commissions of various officers and representatives be 
printed on parchment instead of on paper as heretofore, but we are un- 
able to find from the record that any action was taken thereon by the 
grand lodge, unless these recommendations were included in the mat- 
ters referred to the committee on the "residue of the address," who 
heartily endorsed the same and recommended approval, and the report 
was adopted. 

The total, membership in Minnesota on January 1, 1909, was 23,886, a 
gain of 856 during the year. 

The grand master reported granting three dispensations to form new 
lodges, and that he had placed five corner-stones. Under the head of 
"Condition of the Fraternity," he said : 

Carrying out in a measure a determination made when I was hon- 
ored by election to this responsible position, I have during the past 
twelve months, visited lodges in nearly every section of the state, and 
have met therein many of the brethren of other lodges. My sole regret 
is that I was unable to arrange for visits to many others, by reason 
of two illnesses which practically incapacitated me during the whole of 
the months of March and May, when I naturally could have found our 
lodges at "work." The principal object and the intention of such visi- 
tations were to observe how nearly uniform our lodges work. In ar- 
ranging for such visits I therefore confined my dates to lodges with 
"work," and in order to save traveling expenses, tried to group those 
dates consecutively and in territory not too much separated. But for 
this effort to thus save mileage, I could, of course, with the expenditure 
of additional time, have reached many more lodges than I did, but by 
so arranging I have been able to keep the mileage account down to 
practically 8,200 miles, outside of my travel from place to place in the 
three principal cities of our state. Another object of these visits was 



146 APPENDIX PART I. 



to, if possible, prefer lodges which might not have been visited by a 
grand master within two or three years. Some of them had never re- 
ceived a visit from a grand master before — though chartered twenty 
years or more. 

An oration covering nine pages of the record was delivered by Grand 
Orator Bro. William C. Odell, who closes with the following senti- 
ment: 

Then, my brethren, let us go on in the even tenor of our way, teach- 
ing Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, with the motto, Faith, Hope and 
Charity. Let us strive to make Masonry what God designed it should 
be, a moral preparation for holier things, a stepping stone from virtue 
to grace, a handmaid to lead us on by gentle persuasion to higher and no- 
bler duties, and God, who never yet has withheld the protection of His 
outstretched arm, will continue to shield and defend it from all ills, to 
continue to bless and save mankind. 

The report on correspondence (87 pp.) is another of those interest- 
ing papers by Bro. Irving Todd, who puts into two pages a summary 
of the proceedings of our session of 1908. He refers to the statistics 
of membership, the formation of new lodges, the death of R.W. Bro. 
G. W. Barnard, the reception of R.W. Bro. Fay Hempstead, and the 
"elaborate oration" of Bro. E. E. Beach. He notes the reference to a 
special committee of the Valle de Mexico question, and says, "but with 
Bro. Joseph Robbins as its chairman we guess nit." 

Upon this question he remarks as follows : 

The Grand Lodge of Minnesota has always been very conservative 
in extending recognition, a policy not likely to be disturbed at present. 
No grand body of questionable antecedents was ever formally recog- 
nized, to the best of our recollection. Still we do not assume that those 
upon which no action has been taken are necessarily clandestine, or 
that an exchange of courtesies would be denied upon proper application. 

A construction of Minnesota's position which is hardly borne out 
by their action, as already herein recorded. 

Brother Todd's ability as a condenser is well illustrated in the follow- 
ing quotation from his report : 

Brother Robbins does not believe in the consolidation of lodges by 
a majority vote; or that a separate ballot should be ta'ken upon ad- 
vancement; or that the individuality of a lodge should be impaired by 
model by-laws, records, or forms ; or that a lodge should be reimbursed 
for charity; or that a past master loses his standing by removal to an- 
other jurisdiction; or that a maimed Fellow Craft should be debarred 
from advancement by reason of his misfortune; or that documentary 
evidence tends to diminish the facilities for imposition ; or that a lodge 
under dispensation can affiliate members; or the holding of lodges of 
sorrow in Craft Masonry; or that the absence of its charter invalidates 
the work of a lodge. 

Eugene E. Swan, Stewart, grand master; John Fishel, St. Paul, 
grand secretary. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 147 

MISSISSIPPI, 1909. 

91st Annual. Meridian. February 15. 

The illustration at the beginning of this volume is a well executed 
half-tone of the attractive face of Wiley H. Clifton, elected grand 
master at the session under review. At a subsequent page we find a 
striking picture of John Y. Murry, aged 80, who was grand master in 
1876 and 1S77, and of whom an extended biographical sketch is given. 
There is also a cut of the Masonic Home of Mississippi at Meridian, 
which was dedicated during the current meeting of the grand lodge. 

At the opening of the grand lodge there were present M.W. Bro. 
Edwin J. Martin, grand master, with his associate grand officers, thir- 
teen past grand masters, twenty-six officers, thirteen past grand masters, 
and twenty-one grand lodge representatives, among them M.W. Bro. 
Frederic Speed, who did duty for Illinois, as well as for Maine and 
England. We are glad to give place to the following wholesome sen- 
tences from the grand master's address : 

If we are to continue to be at the making of greater peace, happiness 
and prosperity, we must look well to the selection and training of raw 
material. While there are a lot of near-men always striving for admis- 
sion, and while there are a lot of parasites awaiting a footing on which 
to build a resplendant foliage, good institutions attract good men and 
nobility, unity of purpose and concentration of energy to accomplish a 
well defined ideal brings forth each day a worthy candidate for the hon- 
ors and responsibilities of Freemasonry. It is to this new member we 
should give our support and our aid. He needs it. Let us see that his 
first impressions of this institution are not tempered with a later luke- 
warmness, for it is to him that we will leave our heritage. The older 
generation is rapidly passing away. Each year death claims a few more 
and soon there will be left only the memory of the brothers that have 
brought together from out the turmoil of civil strife, a harmonious, 
united institution. The new members will in their turn meet adversi- 
ties and will need all of their strength to carry forward the work which 
is begun and will be inaugurated. Let us strive to impart the true Masonry, 
the ideal conception, so that when at last our call shall come to sit in 
that Celestial Lodge above, we may leave upon this Grand Lodge of 
Mississippi the impress of our stewardship, departing with a calmness 
and peace, knowing that our sons and brothers will carry on its work, 
striving ever for a true and perfect brotherhood, which is the aim of 
every good Mason. 

Under the head of "Necrology,"' he notices the passing of R.W. Bro. 
Loyal L,. Munn, of our jurisdiction, and pays fraternal tribute to his 
genial qualities. 

He reports the granting of numerous dispensations to ballot or confer 
degrees out of time, and expresses the opinion that this prerogative of 



148 APPENDIX PART I. 



the grand master should be exercised with due caution. He gives rea- 
sons for refusing several requests for dispensations, and among them we 
are interested to learn that in one case he declined to authorize a lodge to 
elect a treasurer to fill vacancy caused by death, for the reason that "the 
law makes no provision for the election of a treasurer." 

He granted ten dispensations to institute new lodges and constituted 
eight others. He placed five corner-stones and dedicated three Masonic 
halls. He quotes the communication from the Grand Lodge of Tennes- 
see on the subject of cipher rituals, given in full in this report under 
Arizona, and made the following reply : 

Meridian, Miss., November 28, 1908. 
Mr. John B. Garrett, Grand Secretary, Nashville, Tenn.: 

Worshipful Sir and Brother : — I have your favor of the 25th, enclos- 
ing an address from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Tennessee to 
the Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the United States. 

I most heartily endorse it from beginning to end, and trust that great 
good may result from its circulation. I shall give it my encouragement. 
Sincerely and fraternally yours, 

E. J. Martin, G.M. 

A matter of more than local interest, pertaining to the status of the 
negro in Masonry, was brought to the attention of the grand lodge by 
the grand master, who quoted his correspondence with the grand master 
of New Jersey upon the subject. In order to place the question fairly 
before our readers, we give the correspondence in full as well as what 
the grand master said under the head : 

NEW JERSEY GRAND LODGE AND NEGRO MASONS. 

Information came to me that New Jersey was initiating and affiliating 
negroes in their lodges. Desiring to get this information from first 
hands, I addressed the following letter to the grand master of Masons 
of New Jersey: 

Meridian, Miss., August 22, 1908. 
Mr. William D. Wolfskeil, Grand Master of Masons, Elizabeth, N. J.: 

Most Worshipful Sir : — I have heard that there is a lodge in your 
grand jurisdiction composed of negroes, and that your grand lodge per- 
mits the initiation and affiliation of negroes as Masons. 
I will thank you to advise me if this is true. 

Fraternally yours, 

Edwin J. Martin, 

Grand Master. 
I received the following reply : 
The Grand Lodge of the Most Ancient and Honorable Society of 
Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New Jersey. 

William D. Wolfskeil, M.W. Grand Master. 

Elizabeth, N. J., August 25, 1908. 
Mr. Edwin I. Martin, Grand Master of Masons of Mississippi, Merid- 
ian, Miss.: 

M.W. Sir and Dear Brother :— Yours of the 22d inst.,_ inquiring con- 
cerning a lodge of negroes in this state received. Your information is 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 149 



correct. Alpha Lodge No. 166, F. and A.M., of Newark, under the ju- 
risdiction of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, is composed almost en- 
tirely of negroes. The lodge was warranted on January 19, 1871, but it 
has never been very prosperous and is not so now, having a total mem- 
bership of only forty-six on January 1, 1908. 

There is no law in this jurisdiction against making negroes Masons 
nor of affiliation by regularly-made Masons, irrespective of color. Al- 
pha lodge, however, is the only lodge in this jurisdiction that has any 
negro members. There are of course a number of so-called negro Ma- 
sonic lodges in the state, but we do not in any wise recognize them. 

Fraternally yours, 

William D. Wolfs keil, 

Grand Master. 

I addressed a letter to Bro. W. A. Roane, representative to this grand 
lodge from the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, enclosing to him a copy of 
this correspondence. 

Brother Roane was in Colorado and my first letter failed to reach 
him. I wrote him again in regard to the correspondence and the negro 
Masons in New Jersey. Brother Roane replied under date of January 
12, 1909: 

Ripley, Miss., January 12, 1909. 
M.W. E. J. Martin, Grand Master, Meridian, Miss.: 

Most Worshipful Sir : — Yours of the 14th came while I was in Col- 
orado, and since my return I have been busy in court and have had no 
time. 

In regard to the initiation and affiliation of negroes as Masons by the 
Masons of New Jersey, I have only this to say, that we, as Mississippi 
Masons, cannot for one moment tolerate such action. There is no mid- 
dle ground for us nor can we afford to compromise the matter by ignor- 
ing it. You are entirely right to discontinue fraternal correspondence 
with the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, and that condition should con- 
tinue till they learn that negroes are not and cannot be made Masons. 
Yours fraternally, W. A. Roane. 

On receipt of this letter from Brother Roane, I addressed the fol- 
lowing letter to the grand master of New Jersey: 

Meridian, Miss., January 14, 1909. 
Mr. William D. Wolfskcil, Grand Master of Masons of New Jersey, 

Elisabeth, N. J.: 

M.W. Sir and Dear Brother : — Yours of August 25, advising me that 
negroes are initiated and affiliated in your grand jurisdiction is received. 

Our grand lodge holds differently. Masonry never contemplated that 
her privileges should be extended to a race morally and intellectualy to- 
taly incapacitated to discharge the obligations which they assume or have 
conferred upon them in a Masonic lodge. It is no answer that there are 
exceptions to this general character of the race. We legislate for the 
race and not for the exceptions. 

We hold that affiliation with negroes is contrary to the teachings of 
Masonry and dangerous to the interest of the fraternity of Free and 
Accepted Masons. 



150 APPENDIX PART I. 



Therefore, I, E. J. Martin, grand master of Masons in the state of 
Mississippi, do order that fraternal correspondence between the Grand 
Lodge of Mississippi and the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New 
Jersey, be and is hereby discontinued until such time as the Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Lodge of New Jersey shall see fit to desist from her pres- 
ent practice of initiating or affiliating negroes as Masons. 
With my best personal regards, I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

Edwin J. Martin, 

Grand Master. 

In this matter I have done what I thought to be to the best interest 
of the fraternity. I am deeply impressed from my experience and infor- 
mation that we should draw the line. No halting between opinions. We 
should or should not. But if we open our lodges to a promiscuous mix- 
ing up, then we destroy Masonry. There is only one way to prevent it, 
and that is to cut loose from the evil in whatever form we find it. Be- 
fore taking this action I weighed the conditions and sought the advice of 
our most conservative and best advised brethren. They almost to a man 
advised me to pursue the course I have taken. In my opinion it is the 
only alternative. The negro in our land is unfit to assume the responsi- 
bilities and obligations of Masonry. It is an open secret that virtue and 
morality, which are indispensable qualifications to membership, are for- 
eign to the race. I felt it my duty as your grand master to cut loose 
from any who would dare open the door of Masonry to a people whose 
standing for virtue and morality is a mockery to civilization. 

This part of the grand master's address was referred to a special 
committee, but no report from the committee is given. 

It is not our purpose to enter into a discussion of this question be- 
tween these sovereign bodies, but we may modestly express the opinion 
that Masonry does not deal with men in groups, classes nor nationalities, 
but treats with each man as an individual. We would unhesitatingly 
vote against the admission into Masonry of the Comanche Indian as a 
class, and yet we are glad to associate on fraternal terms with a full- 
blooded Comanche Indian, who is a fellow lodge member. 

We quote the following from the grand secretary's report on the 
subjects of Masonic Homes and cyclone fund: 

I have received and paid over to the grand treasurer, on account of 
the Masonic Home during the year, the sum of $14,472.86, and although 
this has entailed a great deal of labor, it has been a source of intense 
satisfaction. $7,794.03 of this has come from the lodges and individual 
brethren for the building fund, $4,789.70 for the endowment fund, and 
$1,889.04 for the house furnishing fund. The handling of so large a 
sum of money as this for such a purpose as it has been devoted to, is an 
evidence of the genuineness of Masonic pretensions, and has proven to 
be a very great pleasure to me. 

I also had the pleasure of being the almoner of the brethren in the 
collection and distribution of $2,832.80 for the relief of the cyclone suf- 
ferers in the southern part of the state and $77.20 to enable Purvis Lodge 
to rebuild. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 151 



There is a very full and interesting report from the board of trus- 
tees of the Masonic Home, from which we would gladly make extracts 
if our space would permit. 

The report on correspondence (93 pp.) is the third from the pen of 
Harry T. Howard, past grand master, who opens his review with the 
following quotation, which is too appropriate to be omitted : 

"When 'Omer smote 'is bloomin' lyre, 
He'd 'eard men sing by land and sea ; 

An' what 'e thought 'e might require, 
'E went an' took — the same as me." 

He gives two and a half pages to our session of 1908. From Grand 
Master Bell's address he quotes the entire paragraphs on Masonic 
schools and attendance at church service by authority of special dispen- 
sation. On the latter subject he remarks that it is one of the most 
vexatious problems before the grand lodges and he commends Brother 
Bell for refusing dispensations for the purpose. He refers very pleas- 
antly to the introduction of Bro. Fay Hempstead, the newly crowned 
poet laureate ; and characterizes the oration of Grand Orator Beach 
as a finished production. From Brother Robbins' report he prints the 
entire paragraph on Queensland, and quietly jokes the proofreader on 
a ludicrous blunder that slipped past him about the way "the grand 
lodge was closed by the grand lodge." 

William H. Clifton, Aberdeen, grand master; Frederic Speed, 
Vicksburg, grand secretary. 



MISSOURI, 1908. 

88th Annual. St. Louis. September 29. 

The bluff and hearty face, in half-tone, of John T. Short, grand 
master 1907-190S, greets us from the fly-leaf of the Missouri proceed- 
ings. This is followed by a brief biographical sketch, from which we 
learn that M.W. Bro. Short was born in Carlisle, 111., March 4, 1857; 
that he migrated to Jackson, Mo., in 1876, and from there to Jefferson 
City in 1887. He was made a Mason at Jackson in 1882, and became 
master of Excelsior Lodge at that place in 1885, serving two years. He 
was master of Jefferson Lodge, at Jefferson City, in 1890; was appointed 
district grand master in 1892, senior grand deacon in 1894. and elected 
senior grand warden in 1895. The other illustrations are pictures of a 
corner of the grand secretary's office, with the grand secretary at his 



152 APPENDIX PART I. 



desk, and of the handsome monument, at Kansas City, to the memory 
of R.W. Bro. Allan McDowell, past grand lecturer. 

The session of the grand lodge under review was opened in ample 
form September 29, 1908, by Grand Master Short, assisted by the other 
grand officers. The grand lodge welcomed a distinguished visitor in the 
person of M.W. Bro. Milton H. Price, grand master of Tennessee, who 
in well chosen words briefly expressed the greetings of his grand lodge 
and his own pleasure at being able to attend the meeting. 

We make the following extracts from the address of M.W. Bro. 
Short: 

The year just passed has been one of harmony and good will, and 
the progress made, I trust, has been beneficial and lasting. 

While we rejoice in this happy and prosperous condition of the 
craft, we are not unmindful of the fact that we have lost some of our 
most distinguished Masons. Death has claimed its own and will, sooner 
or later, claim each of us. M.W. Bro. Noah M. Givan, past grand 
master and president of the Masonic Home board, died suddenly at his 
home in the city of St. Louis, on October 3, 1907. He was taken to his 
old home in Harrisonville, Mo., and was buried on Sunday, October 6. 

:jt j(< % % ^c ;fc 

M.W. Bro. Joshua B. Thomas died in Kansas City, Mo., November 
15, 1907. His remains were taken to Albany, Mo., where appropriate 
services were conducted by M.W. Bros. A. M. Dockery and E. F. Allen, 
assisted by the members of Athens Lodge No. 127. An exceedingly 
large number of brethren and friends attended this funeral. 

M.W. Bro. William R. Stubblefield died in St. Louis, January 10, 
1908, and was buried in that city with appropriate services by Occidental 
Lodge No. 163, of which M.W. Bro. Stubblefield was a member. , 

Because of the writer's acquaintance with M.W. Bro. Stubblefield 
(having been closely united with him in some of his capitular experi- 
ences in Chicago in 1864), the following excerpt is printed from the re- 
port of the committee on obituaries : 

William Raens Stubblefield, past grand master, was born at Green- 
field, 111., May 8, 1835, and died at the home of his daughter in St. Louis, 
January 10, 1908, in his seventy-third year. He was raised to the sub- 
lime degree of Master Mason in Occidental Lodge No. 163, at St. Louis, 
March 13, 1859. Capt. U. S. Grant petitioned that lodge for the mys- 
teries of Masonry, and was elected at the same time with Brother Stub- 
blefield, but did not present himself for initiation. Brother Stubblefield 
was master in 1873, and secretary from 1885 to 1898. He was district 
deputy grand master for the sixteenth district in 1875 and 1876, was 
elected grand junior warden in 1877, and regularly advanced until 1880, 
when he was elected grand master. He received the capitular and cryptic 
degrees, and the orders of knighthood in Chicago in 1864. 

The grand master issued eight dispensations to form new lodges and 
reported the placing of fourteen corner-stones. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 153 



Under the head of "Decisions," he says : 

I have made no decisions, but have answered every communication 
sent me ; and on all matters pertaining to questions of law, I have been 
able to dispose of them by reference to the by-laws, or decisions of the 
grand lodge. There are a great many unnecessary questions asked of 
the grand master. If the officers and members of the local lodges would 
become more conversant with the laws, four-fifths of the questions asked 
of the grand master could be properly determined by themselves. 

In these remarks he will be seconded by many a brother who has 
been, is now, or will hereafter be grand master, and the same is true 
with respect to these words from his conclusion : 

I cannot close this report without expressing my high appreciation 
for the advice and assistance given me by a number of past grand mas- 
ters, present grand lodge officers, and a host of other brethren. I have 
found ready response to every inquiry and prompt action to every request. 

From the report of R.W. Bro. J. R. McLachlan, grand lecturer, it 
appears that six general lodges of instruction for lecturers were held, 
having sessions of three days each and that nearly all of the fifty-six 
district lecturers held lodges of instruction or were otherwise actively 
engaged in the promotion of the authorized work — a condition upon 
which we heartily congratulate our neighbors. 

The grand orator, R.W. Bro. I. N. Evrard, delivered what the record 
calls "a most instructive oration." He quoted some stanzas from Tom 
H. Cannon and Edmund Vance Cooke and related numerous stories or 
anecdotes, which doubtless were interesting to listeners. We have not 
space for the full text of the oration and fear we should not do justice 
to its instructive character should we attempt any extracts. The grand 
lodge apparently being in the mood for oratory, addresses were made by 
Past Grand Masters R. F. Stevenson and C. H. Briggs and brief re- 
marks by M.W. Bro. A. M. Dockery. We regret the lack of space for- 
bids us to make quotations from these inspiring talks. 

The committee on recognition of foreign grand lodges recommended 
that the fraternal relations now existing with foreign grand lodges be 
continued. They reported that application for recognition had been re- 
ceived from the Grand Lodge of Greece, the Grand Ledge of Italy, the 
Grand Lodge of Brazil and the Grand Lodge "Cosmos," of Chihuahua, 
Mexico, but that in the light of the information they had received they 
could make no recommendation to the grand lodge and the matter was 
left in abeyance. 

The committee further reported that they had been informed that 
the Grand Lodges of Greece, Italy and Brazil were all making efforts 
to establish lodges in the United States, thus being guilty of the inva- 



154 APPENDIX PART I. 



sion of territorial jurisdiction, but they disclaimed any positive or satis- 
factory knowledge on the subject. 

There is a long report from the committee on appeals and griev- 
ances, giving extended details of many special cases with the names of 
the accused, and showing a marked contrast in these particulars from 
the Illinois practice. 

In most of these cases, the decision rests either upon local law or 
upon circumstances incident to the particular case, and therefore are not 
of such general interest as to justify reproduction, though their publi- 
cation in the state especially interested may be instructive and helpful 
in future instances. 

The following resolution was introduced by W. Bro. W. T. Jamison : 
Resolved, That the grand master may, upon the petition of ten Mas- 
ter Masons in good standing, authorize the formation of clubs to teach 
the ritual and work of the grand lodge under the supervision and con- 
trol of the district deputy grand master for the district in which the 
club is located. 

The district lecturer shall be authority in the work and have sole 
charge of teaching it ; and may appoint competent instructors. Provided, 
That the club shall meet in a regularly inspected and dedicated lodge 
hall, and be duly tiled ; and, further provided, That none but Master 
Masons in good standing, and duly vouched for, shall be admitted. 

This resolution together with two unsigned papers that were submit- 
ted upon the same subject were referred to the committee on ritual, 
who in turn referred the whole matter to the jurisprudence committee 
to be reported upon next year. 

We shall await the outcome with interest, in the meantime only sug- 
gesting the inquiry, why not allow Master Masons to adopt such means 
as seem best to them for acquiring the authorized work of the jurisdic- 
tion, only requiring that when any claim is made that the instruction is 
authentic that an authorized instructor or grand lecturer must be pres- 
ent? With this precaution the details as to security and surroundings 
may be safely left in his hands. 

The report on fraternal correspondence (226 pp.) is the fourth by 
M.W. Bro. Rufus E. Anderson, past grand master, who gives six and 
a half pages to a review of our session of 1907. He quotes from the ad- 
dress of Grand Master Allen, the statistics of our numbers, refers to 
the passing of R.W. Bro. Dill, and gives a summary of the grand treas- 
urer's report. He notes the re-districting of the state into fifty dis- 
tricts and prints an extract from the report of the trustees of the Homes, 
He also copies the report of the committee on correspondence relating 
to the recognition of Saskatchewan, the rescinding of the edict of non- 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 155 



intercourse with Hamburg and the refusal to recognize the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico. He also copies in full the report of the same commit- 
tee on recognized, unrecognized and recognizable grand lodges. He re- 
fers very pleasantly to the introduction of Past Grand Master Gash, of 
Utah, and makes a liberal quotation from his address in the grand lodge. 

Of the report on correspondence he says : 

This is from the ready pen of M.W. Bro. Joseph Robbins and, as 
usual, is not only entertaining, but highly instructive. 

At the conclusion of his report he quotes a personal compliment paid 
him by the Illinois correspondent and adds : 

This, coming from Doc Robbins, not only "tickles our vanity," but 
encourages us to renewed zeal in our work. 

Since the above was sent to the printer we have learned of the death 
of Brother Anderson, and we tender our fraternal sympathy to the 
brethren of Missouri in the loss of an officer so capable, earnest and 
lovable. 

R. R. Kreeger, grand master, Kansas City, Mo. ; John R. Parson, 
grand secretary, 510 Pine St., St. Louis. 



MONTANA, 1907. 

43rd Annual. Butte. September 17. 

The records of the Grand Lodge of Montana for the year 1907 con- 
tain the minutes of four special communications as well as those of the 
annual. 

The first of the special meetings was held December 27, 1906, to lay 
the corner-stone of the Masonic Home. 

The second occurred May 1, 1907, to attend the funeral of the veteran 
and dearly beloved grand secretary, M.W. Bro. Cornelius Hedges. The 
third was at Anaconda, June 5, to lay the corner-stone of new Masonic 
temple, and the fourth was held at Butte, August 19, to place the corner- 
stone of a church. We clip the following from the record of the first of 
these meetings : 

After being duly opened, and the purpose of the meeting being stated, 
the members and attending brethren were placed in charge of the grand 
marshal and with the members of the Masonic Home committee and 
several members of the Order of the Eastern Star, including their past 
grand worthy matrons, Sisters Hedges, Hindson, and Kcnyon, with 



1S6 APPENDIX PART I. 



others, proceeded in sleighs to the site of the Home, about eight miles 
north by east from Helena, where ample arrangements had been made 
by the Home committee for the ceremonies and the entertainment of 
guests, including a sumptuous hot lunch. 

In the evening there was a joint installation of lodge officers and a 
banquet, at which the presence of M.W. Bro. L. A. Goddard, of Illinois, 
"an honored and welcome guest," was noted. 

There is an excellent half-tone picture of the striking face of M.W. 
Bro. Hedges, and opposite it a memorial page recording prominent 
points in his history, as follows : 

Born in Westfield, Massachusetts, October 28, 1831. Died in Helena, 
Montana, April 29, 1907. Senior grand warden at .organization in 1866. 
Grand master, 1870-1871. Correspondence writer for thirty-six years. 
Grand secretary, 1872 to 1907. A zealous advocate of the Masonic Home. 

The volume also contains a likeness of M.W. Bro. A. D. Macdonald, 
grand master, and a brief biographical sketch. 

At the annual communication the grand lodge was opened in ample 
form by M.W. Bro. A. D. Macdonald, grand master, assisted by the 
usual corps of officers. There were present ten past grand masters and 
twenty-five diplomats, Illinois not being represented on account of the 
death of Brother Hedges. The grand secretary reported verbally that 
all lodges of the jurisdiction had made returns and paid dues, and that 
nearly all were represented by officers or proxies. 

In his opening address the grand master spoke fittingly of the passing 
of M.W. Bro. Hedges, and because of his well known prominence in 
Masonic annals, the universal respect and love in which he was held, and 
especially on account of the intimate relations between him and the 
Illinois correspondent, we quote at some length from Bro. Macdonald's 
remarks : 

On April 29 our venerable and beloved grand secretary, Cornelius 
Hedges, whose failing health for many months we had all watched with 
the utmost anxiety, was after a final illness of three weeks, summoned 
to his reward. Brother Hedges was grand master in 1870, and for thir- 
ty-five years was grand secretary of this grand lodge. I presume there 
is not within the sound of my voice this morning one single person who 
remembers any other grand secretary ; and so, when I say that the news 
of his death came with a sense of personal loss to each one of us, I 
make no exaggerated statement. 

It is not my purpose to refer at any length to the life and character 
of our brother. His obituary has been written and placed in the hands 
of each one of you, and in addition will be published with the proceed- 
ings. I shall only say then, that in the course of a long life, Brother 
Hedges was continuously honored in Masonic preferment as he deserved 
to be. In return he gave to the institution of Masonry the very best 
efforts of which he was capable. The many generations of grand offi- 
cers which he saw come and go, all have felt that without his advice 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 157 



and timely assistance their work would have been much more difficult. 
A thorough gentleman, he was at once dignified, courteous and affable, 
making friends of all with whom he came in contact, and enemies of 
none. While Masonry may be said to have been his life work, yet his 
activities were by no means confined to Masonic pursuits. In educational 
matters, in politics, in the church, he was a tower of strength. In short, 
our brother was the very best product of the cultured east, developed 
and broadened by association with the generous and vigorous spirit of 
the west. The absence of his guiding hand will in the future be keenly 
felt : but let us feel thankful he was called away before the blasting 
breath of senility had blighted his splendid mental endowments, and that 
our latest remembrance of him may be the dear old man directing us 
with unfailing clearness of perception into the straight and narrow path 
which it was his desire we should follow. 

He died surrounded by those he loved best on earth, full of years 
and honors ; respected, loved and lamented by all who knew him. He 
died believing that his work was completed, happily and with a perfect 
assurance of a glorious resurrection ; and as we contemplate the peace- 
ful conclusion of his beautiful life we may well imagine him triumph- 
antly exclaiming, "Oh Death, where is thy sting ! Oh. Grave, where is 
thy victory !" 

Brother Hedges was especially known to the Masonic world through 
his work as correspondence committee of his grand lodge, and the author 
for thirty-six years of its reports. 

Few men in the fraternity were more widely known or more gen- 
erally respected and his departure creates a vacancy at the round table 
that will not soon be filled. 

On account of his death the publication of the proceedings was greatly 
delayed and the report on correspondence entirely omitted. His son. 
Cornelius Hedges. Jr.. of Helena, was elected grand secretary, and 
Squire C. Kexyox. of Bozeman. grand master. 



MONTANA, 1908. 

44th Annual. Helexa. September 16. 

The clean shaven face, pleasant features and shrine-bedecked lapel of 
M.W. Bro. Squire C. Kexyox. greet us from the fly-leaf of the plainly 
printed volume which records the proceedings oi the Grand Lodge of 
Montana for the year 190S. First come the minutes of a special meet- 
ing held at Lewistown. August 26, 1908, for the purpose of laying the 
corner-stones of the Fergus county court house and the Masonic temple. 



158 APPENDIX PART I. 



In this double-header the craft were sustained and cheered by the 
presence of the ladies of the Eastern Star, to whom on motion of Bro. 
C. B. Nolan a vote of thanks was extended for their attendance. In 
the evening, work on the sublime degree was exemplified in Lewistown 
Lodge and this was followed by a generous and tempting banquet, though 
the record is silent as to any participation by the ladies. 

The 44th annual communication of the grand lodge was opened at 
9:20 a. m., September 16, 1908, by M.W. Bro. Squire C. Kenyon, grand 
master, with the usual corps of assistants. 

There were ten past grand masters in attendance and twenty-one 
states were represented by ambassadors, but Illinois was not of the num- 
ber. 

Grand Master Kenyon opened his address in the following reverent 
words of congratulation and good cheer : 

By the grace of the great Father above, we are permitted to meet in 
this forty-fourth annual communication of the Most Worshipful Grand 
Lodge of Montana, to exchange fraternal greetings, and perform such 
duties as may seem best for the future welfare and happiness of the craft. 

The year has been one of great pleasure to me, and I am glad to 
report that our beloved order is prospering throughout the jurisdiction 
of Montana. We now have fifty-eight chartered lodges, and four under 
dispensation, all of which, I believe, are entitled to charters at this ses- 
sion. We have gained 392 members during the year, making a total of 
5,082 members up to the 31st day of July. In my visitations, I have 
tried to impress upon the several lodges that it was quality and not 
quantity that we wanted. 

I bid you welcome to this convocation, and may the Supreme Grand 
Master, whom we, as Masons, worship and serve, grant that the year to 
come may be fraught with as many blessings as the past. Montana is 
yet but in its infancy. I expect that in the next ten years to see our 
state advance by leaps and bounds, and Masonry cannot but continue to 
remain abreast of the times. 

He reported six decisions, most of them turning on local regulations, 
and all of them approved by the jurisprudence committee except the 
obiter dictum in one of them, in which he asserted that "a suspended 
Mason is not a member." Probably, if he had said "a suspended Mason 
is a member under disabilities'' the committee would not have taken a 
fall out of him. 

Three new lodges were constituted and dispensations were issued to 
institute four others, from which it appears that there is a lively interest 
in the institution in Montana. 

The grand master gives an interesting account of a trip east and of 
his visits to Buffalo, Philadelphia, Washington and Norfolk, at each of 
which places he was most courteously received and royally entertained. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 159 

Among his recommendations is one, ''that the grand secretary be 
paid a salary sufficient to enable him to perform the duties of his office.'' 

This recommendation was referred to the finance committee, upon 
whose recommendation the grand secretary's salary was made $1200 per 
year, with an additional allowance of $100 for an assistant, a tardy rec- 
ognition of the fact that Brother Hedges was inadequately paid. 

The question was raised whether the dues of a Mason who had been 
regularly suspended for non-payment of dues could be remitted and the 
brother reinstated to good standing. The jurisprudence committee an- 
swered the question in the affirmative and the grand lodge concurred. 

The Illinois law on this subject leaves no room for question by pro- 
viding that "upon payment or remission of the dues, etc."' 

That Montana Masons are not lacking in their gallantry to the ladies 
is proven by the following extract from the record : 

The hour appointed to receive the most worthy grand matron of the 
General Grand Chapter, Order of Eastern Star, and the grand matron 
of Montana, having arrived, the grand master appointed Past Grand 
Masters Kenyon. Macdonald and Smith to escort the ladies into the 
hall and present them to the grand lodge. 

Grand lodge was then declared at case. (Italics ours.) 

The introductory remarks and the speeches in response are given in 
full, and while we should be glad to quote, we are restricted for room 
and will content ourselves by saying that the brethren were polite and 
eloquent and that the ladies were more than a match for them, though 
we trust that the "ease" of the occasion was not greatly disturbed. 

After the resumption of labor, the grand secretary was appointed as 
a committee to secure a suitable testimonial for the retiring grand master. 

As last year's proceedings had not been published, it was moved 
that the proceedings for 1907 and 190S be published in one volume, and 
that the report on correspondence be omitted. 

This was amended to the extent of ordering the two years' proceed- 
ings to be printed separately, but there is no report on correspondence. 

C. B. Nolan, Helena, grand master ; Cornelius Hedges. Jr.. Helena, 
grand secretary. 



160 APPENDIX PART I. 



NEBRASKA, 1908. 

51st Annual. Omaha. • June 9. 

The proceedings of the fifty-first annual communication of the Grand 
Lodge of Nebraska come to us in a well printed volume, without illus- 
trations, enveloped in a cover of belligerent tints of azure which meet 
two of the specifications of the poetical ideal of "deeply, darkly, beauti- 
fully blue." Some day the good taste of the Nebraska brother who 
bosses the job will take precedence over his sense of symbolic coloring, 
and then the good printer will give them a handsomer exterior for their 
record. The session was presided over by M.W. Bro. Ornan J. King, 
grand master, and there were two hundred and seventeen of the two 
hundred and thirty-seven lodges of the jurisdiction represented. We 
clip the following from the opening paragraphs of the grand master's 
address : 

During the past year a large measure of prosperity has been meted 
out to the fraternity in this state, the number initiated being the largest 
of which we have any record. The net increase is also the largest during 
any one year in the history of the grand lodge. Our funds are ample, 
if properly expended, for all necessary purposes ; and it can be safely 
said that at no period of our history have we made greater advancement 
than during the past year. In reviewing these conditions, however, it 
is well to call the attention of the several lodges throughout the juris- 
diction to the fact that the great element of strength in a fraternity 
like ours consists not so much in the amount of work done as in the 
quality of the material received and the manner in which the degrees 
are conferred. Masonry is an institution peculiar unto itself. It fol- 
lows none, patterns after none, and competes with none. It is an institu- 
tion founded for the purpose of impressing upon the minds of its mem- 
bers lessons of morality, obedience to law, and the leading of just and 
upright lives. Every lesson in Freemasonry is intended to impress upon 
the minds of its votaries the duties they owe to themselves and to others; 
and the work of the several degrees should be done so as to make the 
impressions of the sublime lessons and principles as deep and lasting as 
possible. A small increase composed of the right kind of material is 
preferable to untold numbers that might in any way be undesirable. 
It is therefore well to see that none are admitted except such as are 
after due trial found worthy. 

Under the heading "Fraternal Dead," we find a name that will be 
familiar to some of the older members of our grand lodge, who knew 
Brother Lininger previous to 1870, as a resident of Illinois and master 
of St. John's Lodge No. 13, of Peru. The grand master says: 

George Washington Lininger, past grand master, father and presi- 
dent of the Nebraska Masonic Home, died at his residence in Omaha on 
the evening of June 8, 1907. Thus my first official act was the sad 
duty of convening this grand lodge in an emergent communication to 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 161 



attend his funeral, and "to offer up to his memory before the world this 
last tribute of our affection." 

His sudden death was a great shock. He had been in his usual 
place at the meeting of the committee on jurisprudence and the dinner 
of the Veteran Masons on the previous Tuesday, where his last message 
of advice and prophecy was given to those privileged to receive the 
same. His long and loyal devotion to Masonry, his zealous and generous 
efforts in establishing the Nebraska Masonic Home, his ever timely 
counsel and encouragement are enduring monuments to his memory. 
Truly "Death loves a shining mark." 

And this is supplemented by the following from the report of the 
obituary committee : 

By the decree of the Supreme Grand Master, now here, now there, 
a brother is marked for greater prominence ; his spirit, his ability, his 
inherent force, or his consecration to the pure ideals of the brotherhood 
are noted, and by the suffrages of his brethren, he ascends step by step 
the mystic ladder to its topmost round. The death angel marks him 
also, and then in all the lodges there is lamentation and rejoicing; 
lamentation at the loss of a leader, and rejoicing in the tender memories 
of his leadership. 

But a few days after our separation a year ago, the brethren of this 
grand jurisdiction were called upon to mourn the loss of such a leader, 
and as long as the Grand Lodge of Nebraska remains a living factor in 
the Commonwealth, the name of George Washington Lininger will be 
honored. Many bright stars in the constellations of our sister grand 
lodges have faded, and are missing from their orbits, but none we 
feel sure, whose places will be so difficult to fill as that of the illustrious 
brother whose life was a benefaction to the unfortunate, a safeguard 
to the weak, and an inspiration to us all. 

The record further discloses that : 

An oil painting of Past Grand Master George W. Lininger and a 
chair suitably draped were placed in position in the Grand East, and 
remained there during the communication. Deputy Grand Master De- 
Bord delivered an eulogy on the life of Brother Lininger, and made 
suitable mention of the lodge under dispensation that had been named 
in honor of this distinguished Freemason, and in behalf of the brethren 
of George W. Lininger Lodge presented to the grand master and through 
him to all present, a souvenir button with the portrait of the honored 
brother for whom the lodge had been named. Suitable response and 
due acknowledgment was made by the grand master on behalf of the 
grand lodge. 

In the list of deceased brethren of other grand jurisdictions we find 
the name of Bro. Joseph Harrison C. Dill, of Illinois, with the titles 
past grand master and past grand secretary, an error so far as relates 
to his being past grand master, but a pardonable mistake in view of the 
fact that M.W. Bro. Harrison Dills was one of the earlier grand mas- 
ters of this jurisdiction. 



162 APPENDIX PART I. 



There were twenty-two past grand masters and thirty-eight grand 
lodge representatives present, among the latter being Past Grand Mas- 
ter George H. Thummel, envoy from Illinois. 

During the year the semi-centennial of the grand lodge was cele- 
brated and the grand master made the following report thereon : 

Pursuant to the report of the committee on semi-centennial celebra- 
tion as adopted at our last communication, I appointed a committee of 
fifteen brethren to arrange for the holding of such celebration, and to 
provide for the details of the occasion. 

In accordance therewith I called an emergent communication of the 
grand lodge on September 23, and in a most fitting manner the pro- 
gram of the day was executed. I wish to extend my sincere thanks to 
the members of the committee who gave so much of their time for the 
preliminary work, to those who delivered the addresses, to the lodges of 
Omaha and vicinity for the interest as shown by the large attendance 
of their members, to the brethren throughout the state for their pres- 
ence, and especially to our visiting brethren from the grand jurisdic- 
tions of Wisconsin and Washington, who brought fraternal greetings, 
and whose presence added dignity to the occasion. The day closed with 
a feeling of satisfaction and pride in all who were in attendance. 

Believing that the ceremonies, historical address, and orations were 
worthy of preservation and distribution, I decided that a souvenir vol- 
ume should be printed as a further commemoration of the event, and 
instructed the grand secretary to compile and have such a book pub- 
lished. The sincere thanks of this grand lodge are due to him for the 
efficient manner in which he has performed the task. 

Of the $3,500 appropriated to meet the expense of the anniversary, 
only $2,467.16 has been expended. 

Six dispensations for the formation of new lodges were issued, and 
ten decisions made by the grand master. All of the later were approved 
after two of them had been slightly modified by the committee. For the 
most part they are in accord with Illinois precedents, except that visi- 
tors from other jurisdictions must in all cases present documentary 
evidence before being examined. Where documentary evidence is re- 
quired, the tendency is towards exalting its importance and a corre- 
sponding laxity in the esoteric requirements. The chain letter craze 
struck Nebraska and was disposed of in the following sensible fashion: 

I received a letter from the master of Lily Lodge No. 154, Daven- 
port, calling my attention to a chain letter which had been received, 
asking for a small contribution, for the purpose of raising a fund to 
erect a monument to the memory of our martyred president, William 
McKinley, and asking my opinion as to the legality or propriety of such 
a movement. To this I replied that having had similar inquiries previ- 
ously, I had made investigation and found that the post-office depart- 
ment of the United States has a rule prohibiting the raising of money 
by the chain letter system, and I believe that as Masons, we should not 
countenance any movement which would violate the laws of our land; 
I would therefore advise that no attention be paid to any letters re- 
ceived. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 163 

The report on correspondence (101 pp.) is by Past Grand Master 
Charles J. Phelps, who gives a brief but comprehensive summary of 
the business of the Illinois session of 1907, and says of us that we have 
a thoroughly organized force to carry on instruction. Of the work of 
the Home board and of Brother Robbins' report he comments as fol- 
lows : 

Their admirable system of relief is represented by a charity com- 
mittee, the Masonic Home at Sullivan, and the Illinois Masonic Orphans' 
Home in Chicago. The reports, embracing the receipts, expenditures, 
and transactions of these organizations, are full and very interesting to 
those interested in the noble work being carried forward. 

Upon the recommendation of M.W. Bro. Joseph Robbins, commit- 
tee on correspondence, the new Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan was duly 
recognized, and the edict against the Grand Lodge of Hamburg was 
rescinded. Eleven lodges under dispensation were granted charters. 

M.W. Bro. Joseph Robbins again presents an excellent report on 
correspondence, covering three hundred and thirty-six pages. He also 
presents a very interesting special report, which contains a list of grand 
lodges to which qualified recognition has been given to the extent that 
will warrant the Masons of the obedience, not only of Illinois, but gen- 
erally we think, in visiting their lodges, with the consent thereof, and 
will warrant Illinois lodges, and lodges in other grand jurisdictions in 
this country, in receiving on like terms the members of the obedience of 
any of the bodies therein named, as visitors or as applicants for affilia- 
tion. It is a valuable contribution. A like work in each grand jurisdic- 
tion would be of great value, and assistance to the masters and wardens 
of chartered lodges everywhere. 

William A. DeBord, Omaha, was elected grand master, and Francis 
E. White, Omaha, was re-elected grand secretary. 



NEVADA, 1908. 

44th Annual. Reno. June 9. 

Present Grand Master Robert Lewers (a half-tone of whom adorns 
the fly-leaf) and a full line of associate grand officers, except the grand 
senior warden, the grand secretary and three other minor officers, whose 
stations and places were filled by temporary appointment. 

There were also present nine past grand masters, a past junior grand 
warden, the representatives of twenty-three lodges and twenty-seven 
members of the diplomatic corps, including Charles E. Mark, who re- 
sponded for Illinois at roll call. 



164 APPENDIX PART I. 



The zeal of the grand master and the magnificent distances embraced 
in Nevada's domain are shown by the following extract from the grand 
master's address : 

Placed for the time being in the dignified and honorable office of 
grand master, it has been my ambition to do many things for the wel- 
fare of our beloved order, but this is a busy world, and we who are 
compelled by fate to earn our living, are not always masters of our 
time and must leave many things undone. It was my wish to visit all 
the lodges in Nevada, and though the number is not large, they lie miles 
apart and time is needed to visit all. 

My first official visit was to Searchlight Lodge No. 31, in the extreme 
southern part of Nevada, necessitating a trip of eleven hundred miles 
in going, by way of Los Angeles, and nearly six hundred in returning. 
I found in Searchlight many earnest Masons, but not one more zealous 
than Bro. Walter M. Brown, the present master of that lodge. I consti- 
tuted the lodge with full ceremony and firmly believe that the grand lodge 
acted wisely in giving the brethren in this somewhat isolated place a 
charter in order that Masonic light might be spread. 

At Las Vegas I had the pleasure of meeting all the officers of Vegas 
Lodge U.D. at a delightful dinner given by Bro. John S. Park, the very 
capable master. It was a satisfaction to find that the brothers asking 
the dispensation were all men of high standing in the community. Bro. 
John S. Park has been instrumental in building a fine hall for the use 
of . the lodge. I earnestly recommend that a charter be given to this 
lodge. 

In Rhyolite I visited the Masonic club and found a neat and com- 
fortable reading room, and was delighted with the cosy resting place 
provided for sojourning brethren. While I would rather see a lodge in 
every place capable of supporting one, and believing that Masonic clubs 
have some real difficulty in what I may call general tiling, as they have 
no power to examine visitors, I am inclined to think they accomplish 
much good and that temporarily they are for the best. There is a trans- 
ition period in the life of every mining town when it is uncertain whether 
it is to be or not to be, and during this time such a club as the one at 
Rhyolite is the best for the purpose. 

Equally interesting details are given of visits to several other lodges, 
but the above will suffice to show that the social features of Masonry 
and the wants of the inner man are not neglected in Nevada. 

A dispensation was granted for a new lodge at Vegas. Under the 
head of membership the grand master says : 

Grand Master Walter J. Harris last year predicted a large increase 
in membership. When he says a thing it has to come true. Our in- 
crease this last year is 204, making a total membership of 1445. Only 
once has this increase been beaten and that was forty years ago when 
it was 216. The highest membership the grand lodge ever had was 
in 1877 — 1,515. My successor will say that 1909 is the highest. Our 
lowest membership in recent years was 832 in 1897. 

An extract from the grand master's address explains the absence of 
the grand secretary, Bro. C. N. Noteware: ■ 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 165 



The sympathy of the grand lodge is with Bro. Noteware and we 
are all glad to learn that he is improving rapidly. Your grand master 
is under very many obligations to this veteran Mason for his advice 
and counsel in the administration of the business of the office. Years 
of study have made him so familiar with Masonic law that it seems 
impossible for matters to go wrong in administering our law. In con- 
sidering the value of his services in this line, as well as others, I am 
inclined to think we ought to reward him better than we do. 

* * ;fc * * >js 

Bro. George Gillson has kindly taken up the work for the grand 
secretary and will attend to the duties during the session, as I have 
strongly urged the grand secretary to stay at home and do nothing but 
get well, for we cannot spare him. 

It appears from the grand masters address that our Nevada brethren 
are wrestling with the questions of ritual and the identification card 
system. These are dangerous subjects to place in juxtaposition, because 
of the temptation "to get things into writing or print." 

The grand treasurer reports the receipt of $2,379.35 and the expendi- 
ture of $1,795.82, with a cash balance of $3,029.91. 

The grand secretary sent in his report and closed it with the follow- 
ing truly Masonic words : 

Finally, brethren, though illness forbids my presence with you at 
your annual communication, still I am with you in spirit. The Most 
High has raised me up and established me again in strength ; and, in 
my convalescence, it has been a source of great encouragement to me to 
be able to account to you for so prosperous a Masonic year, and the 
co-operation of my brethren has likewise been a tower of strength. May 
we, one and all, so use and improve our Masonry that the grand and 
noble principles of the craft may be glorified, and, through its glorifica- 
tion, may friendships come into our lives that cannot fail to enrich them. 

Communications were received from the Grand Lodge "Cosmos," 
Mexico, and the Grand Orient of Greece, asking recognition. They were 
referred to the committee on correspondence, with instructions to reoprt 
at the next annual communication. 

On recommendation of the committee on correspondence, fraternal 
recognition was accorded to the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. 

The report on correspondence (68 pp.) is by Grand Master Robert 
Lewers, who reserves his introduction to the reviewers work till the 
close of his report and makes it in the following words, which anyone 
similarly situated is prepared to appreciate : 

The writer is perforce of circumstances a volunteer reviewer and 
has done the work because he is a sincere believer in the necessity of 
having a correspondence report. We learn by observing others and the 
experiences of other jurisdictions are always of importance in spreading 
Masonic light. 



166 APPENDIX PART I. 



We have derived an immense amount of valuable information in 
running over the reports as carefully as a reviewer must, and have 
found it of great use in preparing our address as grand master. 

He reviews the Illinois session of 1907. After quoting from the sta- 
tistics given by Grand Master Allen he makes the following comments 
upon Brother Robbins' work: 

Brother Robbins presents a long and learned report, and one worth 
while studying. We do not agree with him when he pokes a little fun 
at the grand masters for urging the desirability of requiring some doc- 
umentary evidence in addition to the regular examination required of 
visitors. 

Brother Robbins takes a determined stand on the subject of grand 
orients and all connected therewith, and we believe his main conten- 
tion, that grand lodges ought to be autonomous, is absolutely correct. 
Grand lodges meet upon the level and should be bodies controlling ab- 
solutely the three degrees. As to his views on the origin of such bodies 
we can only say that we cannot have our way in this world as long as 
they are organized and meet the reasonable requirements of grand 
lodges, they ought to be recognized and will be recognized on a fair 
basis. Some lodges may hold out for a long time, but in the end, the 
various jurisdictions will be compelled by Masonic public opinion to 
recognize real Masonic bodies. 

* * >K * * * 

Under Iowa, Brother Robbins makes reference to the doings of the 
World's Masonic Congress of 1893, and corrects the Iowa reference to 
the failure of securing uniform work. He rightly remarks that the 
congress did not go into the subject at all. It would have been a 
most interesting discussion but that would have been all, as the body 
.did not have the power to do anything. The discussions were learned 
and we remember them with pleasure and satisfaction. 

Brother Robbins is up in arms every time he sees a Knight Templar, 
or a Mystic Shriner, or Master of Kadosh show his head in the grand 
lodge, and we feel sure that he is right, for the grand lodge is a com- 
plete body within itself, and all these good people appear as Master 
Masons pure — we hope, and simple — Brother Robbins would like to have 
them. _ Man fills many stations in this busy world, and when he is in 
a station, that is the most important thing at the moment. 

We say these things in a friendly spirit. It is the exceeding good 
fortune of the writer of this review to be a 33rd degree Scottish Rite 
Mason; to be the Potentate of a Temple of the Mystic Shrine, but when 
we go into a blue lodge, we are a three-stepper, and the three degrees 
are all in all in their own proper home. 

The trouble with documentary evidence is that it is pretty sure to 
erect itself into the position of the "main guy" instead of being content 
to remain an auxiliary. As to "real Masonic bodies," let us suggest that 
the crux of the matter lies just there — what are real Masonic bodies? 

Is there any proper test of the genuineness of Masonry save that 
which Brother Robbins has always urged? When Masons generally, and 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 167 

particularly the "jiner push," fully realize and act upon the fact that 
Ancient Craft Masonry (the Masonry of the three degrees) is the gov- 
erning power in the institution and that the so-called higher degrees are 
descendants and not parents, we shall have less difficulty in understand- 
ing what Brother Robbins meant when he wrote about "dissenters from 
the original plan of Masonry." 

Brother Lewers closes his report with the following pleasant re- 
marks : 

And now, Brother Robbins, we would fain review your whole report 
for it is filled with good things, but we know you do not like to have 
grand masters circumlocuting all the time, so we will have to stop. 
The only apology we offer is that our veteran reviewer, Brother Vander- 
leith, wanted a vacation, and the rest of the good reviewers were busy, 
so we "butted in." 

Charles L. Fulstone, Carson City, grand master ; C. N. Noteware, 
Carson City, grand secretary. 



NEVADA, 1909. 

45th Annual. Carson City. June 12. 

The record of the Grand Lodge of Nevada for this year carries on 
the fly-leaf a half-tone portrait of M.W. Bro. Charles L. Fulstone, 
grand master, 1908-1909, and on a later page a likeness of M.W. Bro. 
Philip Andrew Doyle, grand master, 1894, who died September 16, 
1908. A special communication of the grand lodge was held at Carson 
City, September 20, 1908, to attend his • funeral. A special committee 
prepared a fitting memorial notice, and Bro. E. D. Vanderlieth con- 
tributed to it the following lines : 

Thou mystery of mysteries, death ! 

Thou removest us from the highway 
Of life in the taking of a breath, 

And lo ! we lie grappling with decay. 

Yesterday — life, joyous life — now clay. 
Not for a heart-beat are we secure, 

Thy hand comes forth from across the reach 
And when souls feel strongest to endure. 

The mists roll in from Eternity's beach ; 

The night is starless — nor song, nor speech. 

The forty-fifth' annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Ne- 
vada convened at Carson City, June 8, 1909, and was opened in ample 
form by M.W. Bro. Charles L. Fulstone and his regular staff of 
grand officers. 



168 APPENDIX PART I. 

There were in attendance six past grand masters, a number of other 
permanent members of the grand lodge, and representatives of twenty- 
four constituent lodges. The grand master opened his address as fol- 
lows : 

It affords me one of the greatest pleasures in my Masonic career to 
extend to each and everyone of you a most cordial and sincere welcome 
to this, the forty-fifth annual communication of this grand body. The 
pleasure of greeting you is enhanced by the fact this notable gathering 
of distinguished brethren is held in the city of my home lodge, Carson 
No. 1, whose members join with me in extending to the various repre- 
sentatives and brethren from the constituent lodges a hearty greeting. 
From my own personal experience in visiting the different lodges 
throughout our jurisdiction, I know many of you in coming here have 
traveled several days, some by rail and others by stage, from remote 
localities, to be able to meet with us on this occasion ; to renew your 
fidelity to the divine teachings of Masonry, and to assist in enacting 
legislation that will redound to the credit of our fraternity. 

We have assembled to review the work of the past year and to de- 
liberate for greater achievements for the future. I ask your closest 
attention and careful deliberation on all subjects that may be presented 
to this grand body for consideration. With grateful hearts let us return 
our most humble thanks to our Maker for thus permitting us to meet 
in peace and harmony, for we have good reason to rejoice in the general 
prosperity of our craft, as well as of our state at large. 

He notes the passing of R.W. Bro. L. L. Munn, past grand secretary 
of Illinois, and of various other distinguished brethren from different 
states. Under the head of "Decisions," he makes the briefest report 
we have seen, viz. : 

I have had several questions submitted for my decision by the craft, 
but by reference to our code the desired information was obtained. 

He recites his experience in making an even dozen of visitations to 
as many different lodges, and concludes this part of his address by say- 
ing: 

I would not feel satisfied with my report on visitations without tes- 
tifying to the cordial and courteous treatment tendered your grand 
master. The receptions accorded me by the masters and brethren of the 
different lodges and the enthusiasm shown will long be remembered. 
Special mention should be given to the interest manifested on all occa- 
sions by the elderly brethren, men who have upheld the lofty principles 
taught by our order. They were among the first to greet and the last 
to bid me godspeed on my journey. 

He made a number of recommendations about changes in their by- 
laws and ceremonials, but they are mostly of local application only, and 
he concludes his only too brief address with the following fraternal 
words : 

To our grand secretary, Bro. C. N. Noteware, I am indebted for val- 
uable assistance rendered during the year. I can bear testimony, the 
same as my predecessors, of his faithful service to the craft. The thanks 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 169 

of a grateful heart are due the grand lodge officers for their kind as- 
sistance whenever required. The able support accorded me by E. D. 
Vanderlieth and other brethren by their hearty co-operation is highly 
appreciated. And now, my brethren, I desire to express my sincere 
gratitude and warmest thanks for the confidence you have reposed in- me, 
and the deep appreciation for the highest honor within your gift — that 
of grand master of Masons of Nevada. I have endeavored to serve the 
fraternity with loyalty and zeal, and I herewith submit my record for 
your consideration. If I have erred — and what man has not? — it has 
been from lack of ability and not from any desire to shirk my responsi- 
bilities ; and now, may the deliberations of this session be full of that 
spirit of brotherly love which should attend our every action. 

The committee on correspondence asked for further time to consider 
the request of the Grand Lodge "Cosmos'' of Chihuahua for recognition, 
and upon recommendation of the same committee recognition was ex- 
tended to the Grand Lodge of Greece. The principal reason given for 
the latter recommendation being that their information was to the ef- 
fect that the Bible is used upon the altar and that candidates are re- 
quired to express a belief in a Supreme Being. As a further reason 
they state that said grand lodge has received recognition from a long 
list of regular grand lodges. 

If the information of the committee was no more reliable on this 
head than was the information of a member of the same committee, 
who later stated that the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico had been rec- 
ognized by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, we think it unfortunate that 
they did not "bide a wee" before committing themselves. We suggest 
that the genealogy of the constituent lodges be investigated because 
that is the important factor, the first thing needful. 

We quote the following from a letter addressed to Grand Secretary 
Noteware, by the officials of the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma, anent the 
consolidation of the two grand lodges in that autonomy : 

The Grand Lodges of Indian Territory and Oklahoma were united 
into one grand body under the name and style of "The Grand Lodge, 
A.F. and A.M., of the State of Oklahoma," in a convention held at 
Guthrie on the 10th day of February, 1909. 

On February 9, the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma held its regular an- 
nual communication and wound up its affairs. The Grand Lodge of 
Indian Territory met in grand communication on the same day, at the 
temple, at McAlester, in a meeting called specially for the purpose of 
closing up all of its affairs, which was done in peace and harmony. 

That night, after finishing up its business, the members of the Grand 
Lodge of Indian Territory were taken in a special train of two long- 
sections to Guthrie to attend the convention, arriving there early in the 
morning of the 10th. The Grand Lodge of Oklahoma met this special 
train at the depot in Guthrie, and the two grand bodies marched in dou- 
ble file, in a column more than three blocks long, to the big temple, and 



170 APPENDIX PART I. 



all the brethren registered in the new grand tyler's record, made espe- 
cially for that purpose. 

At 2 o'clock p. m., Grand Master Hoag, of Oklahoma, opened the 
convention with an excellent address, in which he introduced Most Wor- 
shipful Leo E. Bennett (who was grand master of Indian Territory at 
the time the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma was organized) as the presiding 
officer of the convention. 

Brother Bennett then introduced Most Worshipful Joseph S. Mur- 
row, that veteran grand secretary, as the secretary of the convention, 
and Wm. M. Anderson, the grand secretary of Oklahoma, as assistant 
secretary of the convention. 

A constitution has been prepared by a committee of brethren from 
each grand body, which was presented to the convention and adopted 
unanimously. 

* 2J: 5jc j|c ■% ^ 

The convention was then dissolved and the Grand Lodge of the State 
of Oklahoma was opened in ample form. 

On Thursday, February 11, much necessary business was transacted, 
the appointive officers named, the various committees appointed, and 
McAlester was selected as the place for holding the next annual com- 
munication, which will be on the second Tuesday in February, 1910. 

There was not a jar to mar the harmony of all these proceedings; 
everything passed off with the very best of feeling and most fraternal 
kindness, and each side vied with the other in seeing which best could 
work and which best agree. There was not a single dissenting vote in 
all the proceedings, and there were many incidents showing that these 
two grand bodies were united in brotherly love and affection, as well as 
in law, in the most cordial and satisfactory manner. 

This union doubles the strength of Masonry in the new state, there 
being now nearly four hundred lodges and quite twenty thousand mem- 
bers in "The Grand Lodge of the State of Oklahoma," and it will stand 
well up among the strong grand lodges of the world. 

The commmittee on grand master's address among other things, said : 
We approve and highly commend the action of the M.W. grand mas- 
ter in visiting so many lodges during his official term and trust it will 
set a precedent for future grand masters, and that the matter of his 
expenses in making these numerous visits be investigated by the finance 
committee, with the request that they make provision for paying same. 

The grand lodge wrestled with the subject of ritual and work, with 
the following result : 

We recommend that the report of the committee upon uniform work, 
so far as exemplified to this grand lodge, be adopted ; that such work 
be not required to be enforced in any lodge until such time as the 
grand lodge, or its lawfully constituted authority, has made provision 
for disseminating such uniform work; that a permanent committee upon 
uniform work be established, consisting of the grand master and two 
junior past grand masters, together with two others to be appointed by 
the grand master, which committee shall also be the custodians of the 
work ; said committee shall have full power and authority to do all 
things necessary to accomplish such dissemination. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 171 



That the matter of the selection of a monitor be left to the perma- 
nent committee on uniform work. 

It shall be understood that the permanent committee on uniform 
work shall not have power to make changes in work until the same have 
been referred to the grand lodge and approved by it. 

And this report was adopted. 

The report on correspondence (107 pp.) is signed by Bro. Edward 
D. Vanderlieth, grand commissioner of reviews — and by Brethren C. 
N. Noteware, and Robert Lewers, members of the committee. In his 
conclusion Brother Vanderlieth says : 

Again our course is run. In our travels we noted that there are 
more readers of the correspondence reports than formerly, but not 
nearly as many as there should be. Wherever we have found good re- 
ports there we found good Masons and growing Masonry. By becoming 
readers of these reports, brethren, you are benefitted both morally and 
mentally. You are better Masons, better informed and more up-to-date. 
Therefore you are better enabled to make a better fight for better Ma- 
sonry in your jurisdiction. Get busy, my brothers. 

* * * * * * 

Legislation against the admission of the liquor seller is growing and 
growing more involved by its growing. The bookkeeper and the runner 
of the engine in the brewery, as well as the holder of stock in a like 
concern, are down and out. The hauler of the beer from the brewery 
is in danger, thereby endangering all the trainmen on our railroads, 
and the sky is theatening around and about the raisers of the barley. 
The drinker is still standing on safe ground. 

Right glad are we that Nevada is still true to the standard of Ma- 
sonry on the question of temperance, and that the blue lodges are al- 
lowed to select their material in strict accordance with Masonry's 
teachings on this subject. 

****** 

The Grand Lodge of Tennessee is making a strong fight against 
cipher rituals. A vigorous circular has been sent to all grand lodges 
and it has been and is being received with various degrees of com- 
mendatory or condemnatory resolutions, in accordance with the practice 
and usage in the several grand jurisdictions. 

The review of Illinois (session 1908) is signed by the initials of 
Bro. Charles J. Rulison, who gives us only a little more than one page, 
but into it he condenses several items of business and statistics. We 
make the following extracts : 

A great many dispensations were granted, and I note one which was 
refused (in which I concur), that of granting dispensation for a lodge 
to attend church as a body; his reasons for refusing set forth the case 
very plainly and are good and convincing. He recites in detail the great 
amount of work necessarily done during his term of office, including 
many official acts dealing with particularly important conditions, and his 
acts are all approved as a whole. I think that the school of instruction, 
as conducted and fostered, is good and conducive to the purposes in- 
tended — uniformity of work and proficiency. 



172 APPENDIX PART I. 



The M.W. Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico was accorded recognition 
and invited to an exchange of representatives. 

The address of G.O. R.W. Elmer E. Beach, subject International 
Brotherhood, is a strong and able appeal for universal peace, and one 
which, after looking at the brother's photo, which, by the way, is the 
only reproduction in this volume, you might well expect to emanate 
from so strong a character. 

The report on correspondence consists of 349 pages of good, sound 
Masonic thought gathered from proceedings from all over the world 
and is by Bro. Joseph Robbins. 

Just how Brother Rulison made so palpable an error regarding our 
action in re Valle de Mexico, we do not quite understand. Possibly he 
was only forecasting what the future may develop. 

Frank H. Norcross, Carson City, grand master ; C. N. Noteware, 
Carson City, grand secretary. 



NEW BRUNSWICK, 1908. 

41st Annual. Saint John. August 25. 

This volume has a half-tone portrait of Grand Master John S. D. 
Chipman. 

Four past grand masters and twenty-five representatives of other 
grand lodges were present, R.W. Bro. William A. Dougherty appear- 
ing for Illinois. 

The grand master delivered his address, in course of which he said : 
After having been elected your grand master, I intended to show 
my appreciation of the honour by paying an official visit to all of the 
lodges in the jurisdiction during my tenure of office, but circumstances 
over which I had no control, and many important business engagements 
unexpectedly arising, prevented me from carrying out my good inten- 
tions, so that I was unable to make more than thirteen visits, but 
among the number, I had the very great pleasure of opening up a new 
lodge at Edmundston, of which reference will be made later on in this 
report. 

He announced the deaths of Arthur Isaac Trueman, past grand 
master; George M. Jarvis and Frederick W. Thomson, past deputy 
grand masters; John D. Short, past senior grand warden; William 
D. Forster and John McKenzie, past junior grand wardens. 

It was announced that a commission as grand representative had 
been issued to R.W. Bro. John C. Weis, of Illinois. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 173 

The grand treasurer reported $5,544 in the fund of benevolence. 

The communication from the Grand Lodge of Washington relative 
to the Hague Conference, which had been referred by grand lodge, 
at its last annual meeting, to the board of general purposes, was very 
carefully considered, and the board unanimously adopted the following 
resolution : 

That the board of general purposes thoroughly agree in the senti- 
ments expressed in the resolutions of the M.W. Grand Lodge of Wash- 
ington, and heartily support the principle of working towards an event- 
ual disarmament of the nations and universal peace throughout the 
world, and recommend these subjects to the favorable consideration of 
the craft under the jurisdiction of this grand lodge. 

The resolution was approved by the grand lodge. 

Bros. Frank L. Tufts, George Ackman, Herbert C. Creed and 
Fred O. Sullivan, grand representatives of the Grand Lodges of 
Queensland, Valle de Mexico, Ohio, and Saskatchewan, presented their 
commissions. Thereupon they were conducted to the East and pre- 
sented to the grand master, and were accorded the grand honors. 

The attention of grand lodge was called by M.W. Past Grand Master 
Ellis to the fact that the grand secretary was now entering upon his 
twelfth consecutive year of service in that office. He moved : 

That the rank and dignity of past senior grand warden be conferred 
upon V.W. Bro. J. Twining Hartt in view of the term of office already 
filled by him as grand secretary. 

The motion having been seconded by R.W. Bro. Edwin J. Everett, 
P.G.M., was carried. 

Then a more substantial token of esteem was conferred by increas- 
ing the salary of the grand secretary to $400. 

There are thirty-eight lodges on the roll, with a total membership 
of 2,685, the net increase during the year being 184. 

Forty-one dispensations were issued under the authority of the 
grand master, ten of which were for lodges to attend divine service 
clad in Masonic regalia. 

The library committee reported having made an arrangement by 
which a room in the Masonic hall in Saint John will be exclusively used 
for library purposes, and the same has been fitted up with closed book- 
cases. 

John S. D. Chipman, of Saint Stephen, re-elected grand master; 
J. Twining Hartt, of Saint John, re-elected grand secretary. 

There is no report on correspondence. 



174 APPENDIX PART I. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE, 1908. 

1J9th Annual. Concord. May 20. 

The frontispiece is a half-tone portrait of the grand master, Wil- 
liam Alberto Plummer. 

The record opens with a report of a special communication of the 
grand lodge held at Manchester, June 25, 1907, for the purpose of par- 
ticipating in the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Washington 
Lodge. 

This is followed by the minutes of the semi-annual meeting held 
at Manchester, December 27, 1907, at which there were present the full 
line of grand lodge officers, many past grand officers and a large num- 
ber of lodge representatives. 

The main purpose of the meeting appears to have been the exempli- 
fication of the work of the jurisdiction, the first and second degrees 
being rehearsed in the afternoon and the third degree in the evening. 

A special communication was held at Dover, March 4, 1908, to dedi- 
cate the Masonic hall of Strafford and Moses Paul lodges, and another 
at Franklin, April 17, 1908, to attend the funeral of M.W. Bro. John 
Hiram Rowell. 

The 119th annual communication of the grand lodge convened at 
Concord, May 20, 1908, the record thereof being preceded by an excellent 
group picture of the six elective officers of the grand lodge. 

There were present twelve past grand masters, the representatives of 
fifty-six lodges (as compared with sixty-eight at the semi-annual meet- 
ing) and thirty-three envoys representing other grand lodges, but not 
including the brother who holds that place for Illinois. 

In his address the grand master, M.W. Bro. William A. Plummer, 
reported the issuance of many dispensations for installing officers in 
public, for holding meetings in other than Masonic halls and a variety 
of other purposes. 

We notice the granting of a dispensation to Moses Paul Lodge No. 
96 and Strafford Lodge No. 29 to dedicate the new Masonic hall at 
Dover to Masonic purposes. As already noted in this review there was 
a special communication of the grand lodge held at Dover, March 4, to 
dedicate this hall, and we are somewhat puzzled to understand whether 
it was the tail or the dog that got the benefit of the dispensation. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 175 



Grand master says anent this occasion : 

It was impossible for me to attend the dedication of the Masonic 
temple at Dover, and R.W. Bro. Frederick W. Sawyer, deputy grand 
master, very kindly consented to act in my absence, and I received from 
him the following report : 

"In compliance with your request I, as deputy grand master, dedi- 
cated the new Masonic temple at Dover in due and ancient form, on the 
evening of February 20, 1908. 

"The brethren of Dover have demonstrated their courage and Ma- 
sonic enthusiasm by building a splendid temple to replace the one de- 
stroyed by fire on March 29, 1906. The Masonic apartments are most 
spacious and convenient, and the furnishings and decorations display a 
quiet beauty which is most pleasing to the eye. 

"The dedication was indeed a memorable event in the annals of Ma- 
sonry in New Hampshire. Nearly eight hundred Masons gathered there, 
coming from all the surrounding towns and cities. The grand lodge 
was well represented by its regular officers and permanent members. 

"The dedicatory program was successfully carried out with the assist- 
ance of the Schubert Male Quartette of Boston. 

"M.W. Past Grand Master George I. McAllister delivered a very able 
and interesting address. The Dover brethren entertained the grand 
lodge and all visiting brethren in a most royal manner, and deserve 
great credit for the successful manner in which all the details of the 
event were carried out." 

Among the decisions reported by the grand master we find the fol- 
lowing, which is of more than local interest : 

At the time a brother joined a lodge, the lodge had a by-law that 
after a member had paid his dues for twenty-five years he should be 
exempt from paying further dues. The brother referred to paid his 
dues for twenty-five years and then claimed he was exempt from pay- 
ing further dues under above by-law. But several years before this the 
lodge legally amended its by-laws as it was authorized to do, by strik- 
ing out the provision that a member after paying dues for twenty-five 
years should be exempt from paying further dues. Can the lodge col- 
lect dues of the brother under its amended by-laws? 

Answer — Yes. The lodge had a right to amend its by-laws as it did, 
and having that right, the brother must pay his dues. When he became 
a member of the lodge and signed its by-laws, they contained a provi- 
sion that after he had paid dues for twenty-five years he should be ex- 
empt from paying further dues ; but there was also a provision in the 
by-laws that they might be amended, and how it might be done, and 
when he signed the by-laws he agreed and consented to both of the 
above provisions. That being so, the by-laws being properly amended 
in accordance with the provisons contained therein, the brother must be 
bound by the amended by-laws and must therefore pay his dues. 

This was approved by the committee on jurisprudence and adopted 
by the grand lodge. 



176 APPENDIX PART I. 



Concurring in the recommendation of the jurisprudence committee 
the Grand Lodges of Saskatchewan and Valle de Mexico were accorded 
fraternal recognition. 

The jurisprudence committee made a special report on the subject 
of "Dual and Life Membership," from which we make the following 
extracts : 

We believe no man can serve two masters loyally and faithfully at 
the same time, and that no brother can be a loyal and zealous member 
of two Masonic lodges at the same time. 

If a brother belongs to two lodges in the same state, or in different 
states, and does his full duty to one, he must of necessity neglect the 
other. It is contrary to good common sense and wise public policy for 
a man to belong to two political parties, or to two churches, or have a 
legal residence in more than one town at the same time. There is a 
grand lodge in each state in our union, which has its own constitution 
and is supreme within its territorial limits. What would be a Masonic 
offense under the laws of our grand lodge, might not be considered a 
violation of Masonic law in the Grand Lodge of New York, or of any 
other state. In such a case one of our brothers might be punished for 
a Masonic offense in our grand lodge and at the same time be in good 
standing in a lodge of which he was a member in New York, or in any 
other jurisdiction. 

If we should adopt the principle of dual membership, and fraternal 
relations should cease to exist between our grand lodge and the Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts, and a member of one of our lodges should also 
be a member of a lodge in Massachusetts, to which grand lodge would 
the said brother then owe allegiance, and which grand lodge would have 
jurisdiction over him? What would be his Masonic status? Such, a 
state of affairs is not impossible, and if it should exist would certainly 
be embarrassing and intolerable. 

We think that dual membership is undesirable, and that it is not cal- 
culated to advance the best interests of Freemasonry and to promote 
peace and harmony among the craft. 

%. 5|C ^J 5JC >)S jfc. 

Masonry is a democratic institution whose members should enjoy 
equal rights and privileges, and should share equally the financial bur- 
dens. 

Life membership is really class legislation, which is always undesir- 
able. The legitimate expenses of lodges are increasing, and we cannot 
tell what the dues of a particular lodge will probably be ten, twenty or 
thirty years hence. If the principle of life membership should be adopted, 
a brother should pay into the lodge a sum of money sufficient to pro- 
duce an income annually equal to the amount of the dues he would oth- 
erwise be required to pay, and the lodge should keep the principal as a 
fund during the time the brother is a member. 

It is somewhat difficult to safely invest money for a long period of 
time. Investments of such a fund might prove a failure ; the fund 
might be lost — such funds have been lost — and then the lodge, being 
deprived of the principal, would lose the dues of the life member for 
the remainder of his life membership. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 177 



We are of the opinion that it would be unwise to establish the prin- 
ciple of life membership in our grand lodge for the reasons above stated. 

The grand lodge adopted the following resolution : 

Resolved, That this grand lodge does not favor the principles of 
dual membership and of life membership and declines to adopt either 
of them. 

Bro. Harry M. Cheney, the committee on correspondence, gives four 
of his one hundred and sixty-eight pages to Illinois, reviewing our ses- 
sion of 1907. He gives a summary of the principal business of the meet- 
ing showing a careful reading, and notices the fact that our jurispru- 
dence committee were able to report that nothing had been referred to 
them for consideration. 

He says of Brother Robbins' report : 

The report of the committee on Masonic correspondence is by M.W. 
Bro. Joseph Robbins, who, to all of us, is of the ne plus ultra kind. It 
covers three hundred and thirty-six printed pages, and affords to the 
reader thereof a feast that is unsurpassed. He, of course, provokes dis- 
cussion, but defends himself stoutly. Where he does not convince, he 
impresses, so much so that one is impelled to retrace the processes which 
have led to a conclusion, to satisfy that no error has been made. 

He quotes in full Brother Robbins' report of grand lodges given full 
recognition, qualified recognition and no recognition. 

Frederick W. Sawyer, Milford, grand master; Frank D. Wood- 
bury, Concord, grand secretary. 



NEW JERSEY, 1909. 

]22nd Annual. Trenton. April 21. 

The pleasant smooth-shaven face of M.W. Bro. William D. Wolf- 
skeil, in well-executed half-tone, adorns the fly-leaf of the New Jersey 
proceedings for 1909. The first twenty-four pages of the record give 
reports of eight emergent communications of the grand lodge, three of 
which were for constituting new lodges, two for placing corner-stones 
and the other three for the funerals of Past Grand Master Joseph Wil- 
liam Martin, Past Grand Treasurer Charles Bachtel and Past Grand 
Secretary Thomas H. R. Redway. 

The grand lodge convened in annual session at Trenton, April 21, 
1909, Grand Master William D. Wolfskeil presiding. There were 
present the usual line of grand officers, eleven past grand masters, nine- 
teen of the twenty district deputy grand masters, the representatives 

-12 



178 APPENDIX PART I. 



of 176 (all but eight) lodges, and forty-six members of the diplomatic 
corps, not including the representative from Illinois. 

In his address the grand master, among other good things, said : 
It may not be amiss at the opening of the grand lodge, when the rep- 
resentative men of the craft are assembled, to revert to first principles 
and consider briefly the significance and true aim of Masonry. 

Probably there is no better name for Masonry than the Science of 
Right Living. Like every other science, moral or physical, in order 
to be rightly estimated, this must be studied in its history and philosophy. 

****** 

It stands today jeweled with the dews of morning and graced with 
all the charm of youthful vigor and beauty. Its towers are gilded with 
the perpetual sunlight of success and the body of its temple redolent 
with the atmosphere of previous memories. 

****** 

Splendid as is its historic glory, it is only, however, when we enter 
the inmost shrine and catch the spirit rather than the letter of Ma- 
sonry, that the compelling power of its merits is fully realized. The 
external, beautiful and impressive as are rites and ceremonies — and 
symbolism is never without great objective value in attracting the senses 
through which the approach to the soul has to be made — is insignificant 
as compared with the internal. It is the difference between the temporal 
and the eternal, the material and spiritual. 

Masonry justifies its existence not by antiquity, but by principle, 
which, doubtless, accounts for its antiquity. Its supreme object is to 
develop character, a character that is to be as strong in spiritual ele- 
ments and as firmly knit together as the marble blocks and the bond 
of Masonry that gave strength and beauty to Solomon's temple. To 
bind men together in the everlasting and immutable principles of truth, 
virtue and love, with a hold that is as strong as right itself and as en- 
during as humanity ; to recognize man only as man ; to teach that 
true men the world over should unite and contend for the supremacy 
of good over evil;' to teach, not politics, but morals; to foster no 
partisanship, but the recognition of real merit wherever found ; to have 
no narrower limits in which to work for the elevation of man than 
the outlines of a world ; with such inspiration the outcome could not 
have been less than the embodiment of what is truest and best and 
noblest in life. 

Upon the subject of physical qualification the grand master reported 
as follows : 

One hundred and two applications for permission to receive and act 
upon petitions of persons having visible physical defects have been sub- 
mitted to me for decision. In every case I have caused the petitioner 
to be personally examined by the district deputy of the district wherein 
he resided, and upon receipt of report, have granted or refused per- 
mission to ballot, in accordance with my understanding of the law as to 
the petitioner's physical ability to literally conform to all the require- 
ments of Ancient Craft Masonry. Eighty applications were granted and 
twenty-two refused. The records of all the cases are on file in the 
offices of the grand secretary and grand master. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 179 

It puzzles us to know what power of perception, or what authority 
to judge whether an applicant for degrees "can literally conform to the 
requirements of Masonry" is vouchsafed to a grand master, that is not 
equally possessed by every intelligent Master Mason to whom the facts 
are open. Why not place the responsibility primarily on the individual 
member, where it belongs, and then hold the lodge to a strict accounta- 
bility for any infringement of a landmark? 

We know of an instance where under this plan a lodge charter was 
suspended, and that wholesome example served as a warning that de- 
terred any repetition of the offense within a wide circuit for several 
years. It is neither good policy, good sense nor good Masonry to at- 
tempt to shift to the grand master's shoulders a responsibility that be- 
longs to every member of the lodge and which every intelligent Master 
Mason should be prepared and proud to assume. 

If the grand master could have had the benefit of what his own com- 
mittee on correspondence said and quoted on page 39 of the report in 
the volume now under review, he could easily have modified his atti- 
tude for the better on the subject of what he calls ''perpetual penal 
jurisdiction," and which, by the way, is shown in the quotation above 
mentioned to be an impossible mixing of adjectives. But not to con- 
demn the most worshipful brother without a hearing, we quote a few 
sentences from his report : 

It is my belief that our position in claiming perpetual penal jurisdic- 
tion over a rejected petitioner, who has acquired a Masonic residence 
elsewhere, is erroneous. 

The discussion of "plenary" or "penal" jurisdiction in North America 
— the United States, at least — has wandered so far afield from the early 
English practice (none other is worth considering as affording original 
precedents), that the jurisdiction of a lodge over a rejected applicant 
impliedly means something quite different from what it used to be. 

The practice in lodges in Great Britain is still to regard the con- 
geniality of the applicant as the first and most important qualification. 
The rejection by a lodge, therefore, means no more than to exclude the 
petitioner from that lodge — not at all from Masonry. 

That the English practice is the only one worth considering as a 
precedent and that Great Britain regards the congeniality of the candi- 
date as the first and most important qualification, will probably strike 
our readers as an argument more unique than convincing against the 
doctrine of perpetual jurisdiction over rejected candidates. 

On this subject the committee on jurisprudence reported as follows : 
Your committee on Masonic jurisprudence, to whom was referred as 
much of the address of the most worshipful grand master as refers 
to the question of perpetual penal jurisdiction, would report that they 
have given the words of the most worshipful grand master their care- 
ful consideration, and they are of the opinion that he is in error in 



180 APPENDIX PART I. 



holding that in insisting upon perpetual penal jurisdiction this grand 
lodge assumes the position of being better or better judges of proper 
Masonic material than other grand lodges. 

The position of this grand lodge is simply that a rejection has re- 
sulted from knowledge by the rejecting lodge of facts showing that 
the candidate is an improper person to be made a Mason. If there 
has been a reformation the rejecting lodge would doubtless grant a 
waiver. If there has been no such reformation the candidate should not 
be admitted to the fraternity. With our liberal provision with regard 
to such waivers we do not believe that any injustice can be done to 
either a candidate or to any lodge. Of course, we do not assume to 
dictate to any foreign jurisdiction as to who they shall make Masons. 
We only insist that we will not recognize as Masons those who have 
been rejected by a lodge in this jurisdiction, presumably on the ground 
of unworthiness, until such lodge has removed the cloud thus cast upon 
the candidate's character. We therefore recommend that no action be 
taken on this portion of the address of the most worshipful grand 
master. 

The report of the committee after considerable discussion was not 
concurred in, and the grand lodge settled the question for the time be- 
ing by unanimously adopting the following resolution : 

Resolved, That penal jurisdiction shall be retained over rejected 
petitioners by the rejecting lodge so long as the rejected petitioner con- 
tinues to reside within the jurisdiction of this grand lodge, and penal 
jurisdiction shall be terminated only by a bona fide removal from the 
state or the consent of the rejecting lodge. 

There has been so much discussion of and such general interest in 
the "negro question" that has arisen between the Grand Lodges of New 
Jersey and Mississippi, that at the expense of unusual space we quote 
what Grand Master Wolfskeil says on the subject under the head of 
"Sister Jurisdictions," because it not only throws light upon the present 
controversy, but also gives historical data of interest : 

Our relat'ions with all other grand jurisdictions, continue to be hap- 
pily fraternal, with perhaps one exception. In August last I received a 
letter from the grand master of Mississippi, in which he stated that he 
"had heard that there is a lodge in your grand jurisdiction composed 
of negroes, and that your grand lodge permits the initiation and affilia- 
tion of negroes as Masons," and requesting to be advised if this is true. 
I at once replied, supposing the inquiry to have been prompted by per- 
sonal curiosity, which I had satisfied by a brief relation of the facts in 
regard to our Alpha Lodge No. 116. After an interval of several 
months, I received this letter : 

"Meridian, Miss., January 14, 1909. 
"Mr. William D. Wolfskeil: 

Yours of August 25, advising me that negroes are initiated and af- 
filiated in your grand jurisdiction, is received. 

"Our grand lodge holds differently. Masonry never contemplated 
that her privileges should be extended to a race totally morally and 
intellectually incapacitated to discharge the obligations which they as- 
sume or have conferred upon them in a Masonic lodge. It is no answer 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 181 



that there are exceptions to this general character of the race. We legis- 
late for the race and not for the exceptions. 

"We hold that affiliation with negroes is contrary to the teachings of 
Masonry, and is dangerous to the interest of the fraternity of Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

"Therefore, I, E. J. Martin, grand master of Masons in the State of 
Mississippi, do order that fraternal correspondence between the Grand 
Lodge of Mississippi and the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New 
Jersey be and is hereby discontinued until such time as the Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Lodge of New Jersey shall see fit to desist from her 
present practice of initiating or affiliating negroes as Masons. 

"With my best personal regards, I am, sincerely yours, 

"Edwin J. Martin, 

"Grand Master." 

Some of the correspondence between grand masters is prompted by 
an overburdening sense of responsibilty for the good conduct of the 
craft, often enough outside of their own jurisdictions, and common 
courtesy suggests that such instances of emotional activity be kept 
where they belong, in the private records of the grand master. 

I would not make mention of this matter to this grand lodge, as I 
have no knowledge of any official action by the Grand Lodge of Mis- 
sissippi in support or denial of the pronunciamento of its grand master, 
but for the fact that the Associated Press wires were used as an agency 
to disseminate the story of Mississippi's exclusion of herself from the 
taint or tint of fraternal correspondence with New Jersey, and the con- 
sequent publicity brought to me many inquiries as to what this "brain 
storm" was all about from brethren of our own jurisdiction. 

This greatly surprised me until it was remembered that the lapse of 
thirty-eight years had brought into active Masonic life and interest a 
generation which knew little or nothing of the history of a matter always 
misunderstood and nearly always misrepresented when mentioned. 

I feel no call to enlighten the nescience of other jurisdictions in the 
premises, but I do consider it my duty to briefly set forth the facts as 
shown by our grand lodge records for the enlightenment of our own 
present membership. 

In 1870, Grand Master Cannon, in his address to grand lodge in 
eighty-third annual communication, called attention to an application 
of colored Masons for recognition and connection with this grand lodge 
then to be presented, and bespoke for them consideration and careful 
inquiry as to their claims. The matter was referred, on recommenda- 
tion of the committee on grand master's address, to the committee on 
jurisprudence and charity. This committee reported that while the peti- 
tion of these colored persons claiming to be Masons, praying recognition 
and enquiring as to the proper steps to be taken by them to bring them- 
selves within the jurisdiction of the grand lodge, was respectful and 
entitled to courteous consideration, yet the questions involved were oi 
great and increasing importance and required more careful and studious 
investigation than could be accorded at the present session, and therefore 
recommended that they be referred to a special committee for duo con- 
sideration and report at the next annual communication. 



182 APPENDIX PART I. 



The special committee appointed to consider the matter consisted of 
Past Grand Masters Trimble and Whitehead and W. Henry Vehslage, 
who subsequently became grand master. 

In 1871 this committee made a report covering five pages of the pro- 
ceedings_ (233-4-5-6-7), in which they dealt with the subject exhaust- 
ively, quite aware that it had been referred to them not merely to point 
out the technical defects under and by reason of which the application 
for a lodge could not be granted. 

The examination of the claims of these petitioners to legitimacy as 
descendants of African Lodge No. 454, warranted by the Grand Lodge 
of England in 1784, subsequently transformed into the pseudo-Prince 
Hall Grand Lodge and the subsequent founding of lodges of colored 
men, was briefly, but clearly submitted, and the conclusion of the com- 
mittee that recognition could not be accorded to them by the Grand 
Lodge of New Jersey, was based on a recital of historic details and con- 
ditions, which so far are unaffected by the lapse of time. 

Remembering the personnel of that committee, than whom no abler 
Masonic jurists ever adorned our Grand East, it was to be expected 
that their report would include an indication of the right way to become 
a Mason, under the landmarks of the fraternity. 

They "deemed it consistent with the duty assigned them to intimate 
to the petitoners that there is one, and but one, regular way in which 
their purpose of affiliation with this grand lodge can be realized, and 
that is by pursuing the same process to which all profanes are sub- 
jected. The doors of the Masonic lodges in New Jersey are open to 
all men, freeborn and of lawful age, of every clime, of every color and 
of every creed, who declare their trust to be in God, have passed the 
scrutiny of a committee of a lawful lodge and have achieved the favor- 
able verdict of the secret ballot;" and in not one jot or tittle has this 
interpretation of the law of Masonry been altered or changed in this 
state. 

Let it be carefully noted that this examination and report on the 
claims of the so-called Prince Hall Masons closed the incident, and it 
has never been re-opened in New Jersey. 

At the same communication of the grand lodge, an application was 
received from nine demitted Masons of our own regular lodges, pos- 
sessed of every statutory qualification, accompanied by the recommenda- 
tion of St. John's Lodge No. 1, for a lodge in Newark, and upon the 
favorable report of the committee on dispensations and warrants, a 
warrant was granted to them, to be hailed as Alpha Lodge No. 116, and 
said lodge was duly constituted by Grand Master William E. Pine on 
January 27, 1871. On the twenty-fourth of the following month he 
arrested the warrant, upon a complaint that it had been obtained from 
the grand lodge by deceit and misrepresentation, and the evident con- 
jecture "that certain proceedings of the lodge had a tendency to disturb 
the peace and harmony of the craft in this jurisdiction," although from 
surviving participants in the event, and as confirmed by the action of 
the grand lodge a year later, it is learned that no ground for suspicion 
existed, that it was the intention of the warrant members of Alpha 
Lodge to receive the petitions of colored men, at the time the warrant 
was sought and granted. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 183 

The warrant was impounded until 1872, when his action was reported 
to grand lodge by Grand Master Pine, and the matter referred to the 
committee on petitions and grievances, which reported a very full ex- 
amination of the grounds of the complaint and the grand master's ac- 
tion, and agreed that the most worshipful grand master acted properly 
in arresting the warrant of Alpha Lodge No. 116, but we find nothing 
in the record that includes or suggests the subject matter of the unma- 
sonic conduct which apparently justified the act. Discussion of this 
report was twice taken up at this communication, and the record indi- 
cates that the subject was left to grand lodge for disposition, and on 
page 454 of the Proc. 1872, appears a motion "that the warrant of Alpha 
Lodge No. 116, be restored to said lodge, was agreed to." 

Of the conduct or administration of the affairs of Alpha Lodge, after 
its warrant had been returned to it, no one now alive may justly offer 
criticism. It may be safely assumed that every grand master succeed- 
ing M.W. William E. Pine, kept that lodge under watchful supervision, 
and became satisfied that every petitioner for membership was dealt 
with in literal and exact conformity to the rules of this grand lodge 
and the regulations governing the craft. 

That some of the colored persons who made the original application 
to the grand lodge in 1870 for recognition as Masons and to be created 
into a lawful lodge, were subsequently petitioners to Alpha Lodge, and 
were duly initiated, passed and raised therein, and that the lodge has. 
during most of the thirty-eight years of its existence, included Masons 
of negro descent in its membership, is the fact. 

It is believed that in no other lodge in this grand jurisdiction is 
there a Mason of negro descent, and while the present sociological con- 
ditions prevail it is unlikely that self-respecting colored citizens will 
seek membership in other than the organizations of the Prince Hall 
derivation, which are known to exist in this state, as in every other 
state of the union. 

On this subject we do not here care to comment at any great length. 
We freely concede to these sovereign grand lodges the power and right 
to control each for itself its own internal affairs, and we are willing 
that they should settle between themselves any differences which may 
arise, but when the broad statement is made that "we legislate for the 
race and not for the exceptions" we venture the opinion that the ground 
is untenable from the viewpoint of those who teach that "Masonry 
unites men of every country, sect and opinion." 

We believe that applicants for Masonic preferment should be judged 
by their individual merits and not by the faults or color of their race v 

Although we have already quoted from the grand master's address 
at unusual length, we are unwilling to omit the following noble senti- 
ments from his conclusion, words for which we heartily say, thank you : 

Brethren, I want the end of this address to be logically consistent 
with its beginning. In opening I justly extolled Masonry, its history 
and principles. In conclusion, would emphasize our personal responsi- 
bility as members of so privileged an institution and as custodians of 
so priceless a charge. 



184 APPENDIX PART I. 



Unless I misread the signs of the times, there is writ large upon the 
face of this century that impelling word SERVICE. 

It would seem that institutions are to be judged in this twentieth 
century, as never before, upon their ability and willingness to be of use 
to mankind. This is to be the humane age, as distinguished from the 
theologic, scientific, analytic, all of which terms have characterized cer- 
tain past ages. If this contention is right, now is Masonry's great op- 
portunity, her accepted time, her day of salvation. 

The grand lodge had the pleasure of welcoming as a visitor His Ex- 
cellency the Governor of New Jersey, who was received with appropri- 
ate ceremonies and introduced as Brother John Franklin Fort, of 
Hope Lodge No. 124. 

Other distinguished visitors were : 

M.W. Henry I. Bears, Jr., grand master, M.W. Thomas J. Day, 
P.G.M., M.W. Harry J. Guthrie, P.G.M., and R.W. Lewis B. Morrow, 
P.G. treasurer, of Delaware; R.W. J. Henry Williams, junior grand 
warden, Brothers Thomas D. Finletter, Samuel A. Boyle, Robert R. 
Bringhurst, George Hale, district deputy grand masters, and Bro. John 
A. Perry, deputy grand secretary, of the grand jurisdiction of Penn- 
sylvania. 

All of whom were fittingly received and eloquently introduced, some 
of them responding in no less fraternal and inspiring words. We regret 
that lack of space forbids quotations from these excellent speeches. 

The report on foreign correspondence is from the experienced pen 
of R.W. Bro. Robert A. Shirrefs, who generously allots to Illinois 
four of his 150 pages. 

He quotes from the opening portion of Grand Master Bell's ad- 
dress at our session of 1908 ; refers to the death of R.W. Bro. Bar- 
nard, whom he calls one of the best known Masons in the middle states, 
and gives his readers the benefit of several statistical items contained 
in various reports of our grand lodge officers. 

He speaks with approval of Brother Bell's letter to lodges on the 
formation and recommendation of new lodges ; notices the change in 
our corporate name, and says that "the gravely dignified, but attractive 
features of Grand Orator Beach are a guarantee that his oration was 
good." He also notices the introduction and reference to special com- 
mittee of a resolution looking to the recognition of the Grand Lodge 
Valle de Mexico. 

Of the report of Brother Robbins on correspondence he says : 
From the pages of M.W. Brother Robbins' report on Masonic cor- 
respondence (we are proud of the number, but refrain from saying how 
many), due to his examination of New Jersey's proceedings for 1908, 
we gather food for thought and ground for improvement. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 185 



On the subject of jurisdiction over rejected candidates he writes: 
Grand lodges and grand masters generally seem to regard lodges as 
unable to square themselves properly in these cases of rejected candi- 
dates fleeting away to the nearest ferry and getting into a lodge in a 
nearby jurisdiction, sometimes lying themselves into good company, 
sometimes waiting patiently about until a year has elapsed and so forth ; 
and then, clothed as a Master Mason, entering the lodge of their orig- 
inal rejection and twiddling thumb and fingers at nose in addition to 
the proper sign on entry. The American right of visitation would get 
a jolt, and the proud visitor get a new idea of his rights, if the matter 
were left to the lodge visited. 

J. Clarence Conover, Freehold, grand master ; Benjamin F. Wake- 
field, Trenton, grand secretary. 



NEW MEXICO, 1908. 

31st Annual. Albuquerque. October 19. 

The proceedings of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico open with the 
records of special communications at Albuquerque, November 21, 1907, 
to install the grand treasurer-elect; at Hope, December 6, to constitute 
Penasco Lodge ; at Estancia, December 7, to constitute Estancia Lodge ; 
at Elida, December 7, to constitute Elida Lodge ; at Roswell, December 
21, to install the grand lecturer; at Silver City, December 27, to install the 
junior grand deacon, and at Carlsbad, December 27, to install the grand 
chaplain. Let us remark in passing that in Illinois it is the usual prac- 
tice tfor the grand master to authorize a special proxy to install any 
grand lodge officer of the line who is not present in grand lodge for the 
ceremony, and that the installation may take place in any regularly con- 
stituted lodge when assembled in stated meeting. 

There is also the record of an emergent communication of the grand 
lodge at Albuquerque, March 6, 1908, to attend the funeral services of 
Past Grand Master William Burr Childers, and of another emergent 
communication at Las Cruces, June 21, 1908, to give Masonic burial to the 
remains of Past Grand Master Elias Elwood Day. 

The thirty-first annual communication of the Grand Lodge of New 
Mexico was opened at Albuquerque, October 19, 1908, Grand Master J. W. 
Willson, presiding. There were present besides the regular line of 
grand officers, twelve district deputy grand masters, ten past grand mas- 
ters, eleven past deputy grand masters, eight past senior grand wardens, 
ten past junior grand wardens, and the representatives of twenty-nine 
lodges. 



186 APPENDIX PART I. 



We quote the following from the address of the grand master: 
The last Masonic year has been one of prosperity for the craft in this 
grand jurisdiction. The lodges, as a general rule, have been fortunate 
in having competent and zealous brothers in charge; most excellent 
work has been accomplished ; many new lodges have been formed ; and 
above all peace and harmony have prevailed, not only between the sev- 
eral subordinate lodges, but, with few exceptions, among the individual 
brethren as well. 

He reported the granting of six dispensations to form new lodges. 

Among the dispensations for special purposes we note that some of 
them are for holding special or emergent communications of the grand 
lodge. In Illinois we reach the same end by a somewhat different pro- 
cess. The grand master appoints a special proxy for a specially desig- 
nated purpose, authorizing said proxy to open an "occasional" grand 
lodge therefor. 

Several dispensations that were asked for were refused, among them 
one to initiate a maimed candidate, and another to afford Masonic burial 
to a non-affiliate because he had been unaffiliated more than one year. 

The grand master remarks of the latter that he afterwards learned 
that the brother had been without the order more than twenty years, 
which we are to infer multiplies the reason of his refusal by twenty, 
and causes one to ponder on the beauties of compulsory legislation to 
compel affiliation. In this connection we quote two of the grand master's 
decisions, which were approved by the committee and the grand lodge. 

7. During the year, several lodges requested a ruling whereby initiates 
shall be required to prepare themselves and apply for advancement in 
Masonry. 

I answered these requests, in substance, by stating that Masonry 
does not, under any circumstances, attempt to, or even desire to force a 
candidate to advance to the next higher degree against his will ; that, 
if he is not sufficiently impressed with the beauties of Masonry after be- 
ing initiated, to seek further promotion, by simply being afforded the 
opportunity, the craft suffer less by having him remain an apprentice 
than were he to be advanced to the higher degrees. 

8. Held that a non-affiliated Mason, even though he hold a dimit 
which is more than one year old, if otherwise in good standing, has the 
right to assist in forming a new lodge and to make application as charter 
member thereof. 

We also quote the following from the report of the committee on 
grand master's address : 

We also approve his action in refusing to grant certain dispensations, 
but recommend, however, that according to New Mexico law, the burial 
by a lodge of non-affiliates should be left to the discretion of the sub- 
ordinate lodge, to which the request has been made, thereby affirming 
the decisions of Grand Masters Poe and Stover. 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 18? 



From the conclusion of the grand master's address we clip the fol- 
lowing : 

With the exception of dispensations granted for forming new lodges, 
my official acts are somewhat brief. This, however, is not to be under- 
stood as indicating a loss of interest in Masonry in and among our 
chartered lodges during the past year, but, to the contrary it shows that 
peace, harmony and prosperity have prevailed within this grand jurisdic- 
tion. A great many of our lodges, especially the stronger ones, are for- 
tunate enough to have among their membership distinguished Masons; 
men who have served this grand lodge and who are ever ready to pre- 
vent controversies and contentions. I consider that we are especially for- 
tunate in having so many of our past grand masters to assist the officers 
and brethren of subordinate lodges in promoting and upbuilding their 
respective lodges. 

While I have not been able to visit a great many of the lodges, I 
have ever been in close touch with them through competent advisors and 
can intelligently report that Masonry has prospered within New Mexico 
during the past year as never before. However, my brethren, we have 
no right to be satisfied with present conditions, for should we reach that 
point where ambition no longer stimulates, growth and progress will 
stop and decline and decay begin. 

We are glad to see that Bro. James A. Worth, chairman of the cor- 
respondence committee and a member of the committee on grand mas- 
ter's address, in the latter capacity, presented the following minority 
report : 

The undersigned, a member of the committee on grand master's ad- 
dress, desires to present a minority report. I heartily agree with the 
report already read, and accept the conclusions of the committee, save 
that recommendation of the grand master which desires that all cor- 
respondence between lodges of different jurisdictions must be carried on 
through the office of the grand master. 

It is my impression and belief that such matters are an inherent right 
which no grand lodge can take away from its subordinates, and I believe 
that Masonic history will prove that in the formation of grand lodges 
by subordinate lodges, this is one of the rights that were not given up 
by subordinate lodges, and that legislation in this matter by a grand 
lodge is a violation of the rights of its component members. 

Although the grand lodge concurred in the majority report, we are 
confident that the position of the minority is right and that it will ulti- 
mately prevail. A resolution was adopted extending the sessions of the 
grand lodge to three days instead of two, to become operative in 1900. 

The report on correspondence (110 pp.) is by Bro. James A. Worth, 
who has opinions and convictions and possesses the courage to express 
them. He reviews the proceedings of our session of 1007, and says of 
the address of Grand Master Allen that it gives an unusually full and 
complete statement of the doings of his office for the year. He notes 
our action in the recognition of Saskatchewan, the rescinding of the edict 



188 APPENDIX PART I. 



against Hamburg and the refusal to recognize the Valle de Mexico, and 
says of the latter : 

New Mexico's reasons for granting recognition to this grand lodge 
were fully set forth in our report made last year, and the cause for the 
condition existing in that republic are also stated in this report, under 
District of Columbia, giving reasons why the hands of Valle de Mexico 
should be held up and assisted in view of the Masonic conditions in the 
republic of Mexico. 

Of the report of Brother Robbins and his work he comments as fol- 
lows : 

The report on foreign correspondence is, as has been for many years, 
under the direction of Brother Robbins. Right here, like the boy steal- 
ing a ride, is where we want to get off. We always approach Brother 
Robbins' report with carefulness and circumspection, and while, like the 
dog on the back street, we can go around and make a great big howl 
in our own particular back yard, whenever we approach Illinois' report, 
we feel like that self-same dog, who races around the corner, full of his 
own importance, and finds himself face to face with a great big mastiff, 
and there are times, when rather than have a discussion with our learned 
brother, we would tuck our tail between our legs and go home. How- 
ever, as some of our friends say, "business is business," and we intend 
to keep our end up as near as we know how. 

The report of Brother Robbins is unusually fat, and we shall start 
out by quoting from his preface, things which we heartily agree with. 

He here refers particularly to Brother Robbins' position anent docu- 
mentary evidence for visitors, and his belief that "every regular lodge 
has the right to correspond regarding different subjects with any other 
regular lodge." Of the latter he remarks : 

We regret to have to inform our brother that the reverse rule was 
adopted by this grand lodge at its last meeting, but, as he will see, the 
writer had the courage to introduce a minority report. This is one of 
the things in which we disagree with our own grand lodge — a rare con- 
dition of affairs. 

He closes his report as follows : 

On the whole, while upon such matters as Queensland and others, we 
must still agree to differ, we can always learn something in the perusal 
of Brother Robbins' reports. 

He stands up deliberately and completely for the inherent rights of 
lodges, evidently placing those rights as having been acquired even be- 
fore the formation of the grand lodges themselves, in which we think 
he is right, although we differ with him positively upon the proposition 
that three, and three only, if needed, are required to form a grand lodge, 
irrespective of the number of lodges within the jurisdiction involved. 

Between his views and those of another learned brother, of an equally 
large and influential jurisdiction, the majority of the Masonic reviewers 
can afford to sail a middle course — not at all from motives of policy, 
but from the fact that each one of these two reviewers brings out the 
salient points, with their beliefs, so fully and so completely, that the rest 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 189 



of us are able to make up our minds and base our grounds on what we 
think is a truthful estimate of the arguments presented. 

Without attempting any argument with Brother Worth, who is evi- 
dently on the right track in the main, and who we believe wants to be 
fair, and consequently is likely to come nearer to Brother Robbins' 
views the more he ponders over the questions under discussion, we just 
want to call his attention to what we think a misunderstanding and con- 
sequent misstatement of Brother Robbins' views about the number of 
lodges needed to form a grand lodge. While it is true that Brother 
Robbins stated in connection with the discussion that three lodges were 
sufficient to form a grand lodge, he expressly defined the conditions which 
in the Queensland case applied to the situation. Our understanding and 
version of his contention in the Queensland case is substantially this, 
viz. : that in order to form a grand lodge the following requirements 
must prevail : 

1st. All the regular lodges in the territory must have notice of the 
proposed meeting and its purpose. 

2nd. All the lodges must be free to accept or decline the invitation. 

3rd. All lodges who by choice or by reason of restraint exercised 
over them, refrain from participation in the meeting, are not counted 
and should not be considered in forming the conclusion. 

4th. A majority of the lodges answering the call and participating 
in the meeting may legally form a grand lodge, provided that said ma- 
jority is made up of at least three lodges. 

If Brother Worth will go over this carefully in reviewing the 
Queensland question, we are confident that he will see in it a decided 
modification of his interpretation of Brother Robbins' position. 

Charles D. Stevens, Raton, grand master; Alpheus A. Keen, Al- 
buquerque, grand secretary. 



NEW SOUTH WALES, 1908. 

20th Annual. Sydney. , June 1C. 

We have before us the proceedings of four quarterly and two special 
communications, at all of which, with the exception of one of the lat- 
ter, the grand master, His Excellency Admiral Sir Harry H. Rawson. 

presided. 

1 

There are 214 lodges in the jurisdiction, with a total membership of 

12,570, an increase of 784 during the year. The various benevolent 
funds belonging to the grand lodge amount to £58,884. 



190 APPENDIX PART I. 



The volume opens with the proceedings of a special communication 
held in the Masonic hall, Sidney, July 30, 1907, for the installation for 
the third consecutive term of the grand master and the investure of the 
other grand lodge officers. Fifty-nine grand jurisdictions contributed to 
the diplomatic corps, Illinois being represented by Bro. W. Beavis. 
Distinguished visitors were Past Grand Master W. S. Byrne, of Queens- 
land ; Grand Steward Howe, of Western Australia ; Deputy Grand 
Master J. G. Davies, of Tasmania; Pro Grand Master F. C. Binns, of 
New Zealand; Grand Master George E. Emery, of Victoria. 

After the installation of the grand master he was presented with a 
"standard," bearing his coat of arms and an appropriate inscription, by 
the grand lodge officers, the presentation address being made by Deputy 
Grand Master William C. Shipway. The grand master accepted the 
banner in a happy speech, after which he welcomed the visitors in such 
terms as to call out responses from them which aroused great enthusi- 
asm. Odes and anthems interspersed the exercises, which were of a 
very enjoyable character. 

At the quarterly communication of September 11, 1907, the grand 
master reported having granted during the quarter ninety-six dispensa- 
tions, three of which were for the "initiation of a Lewis," a ceremony 
unfamiliar to most American Masons. A district inspector of workings 
reported having visited a lodge, when "two candidates came in about 
sixty miles from the Kiandra side to be raised, knowing that no more 
opportunities might offer this winter." 

At the succeeding quarterly the grand master said in the course of 
his address: 

I have to record with sorrow the death of Wor. Bro. J. H. C. Dill, 
past grand secretary of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, who departed this 
life on the 5th August, 1907, aged 71 years. 

We, who had the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with Brother 
Dill, have not ceased to "sorrow, because we shall see his face no 
more," and will long remember his sweet disposition and many lovable 
qualities. 

At the quarterly of March 11, 1908, the grand master thus referred, 
in part, to his lamented predecessor : 

Before giving the usual report of work done during the quarter, I 
would like to refer to the greatest shock that our Masonic world has 
felt, viz, the sudden news of the death of M.W. Bro. Lieutenant Colonel 
John Cochrane Remington, V.D., immediate past grand master of this 
grand lodge. His death took place on the 28th February, 1908, at the 
age of 58 years. Born on the 16th May, 1850, he was initiated into 
Freemasonry on the 23rd May, 1871. in the old Volunteer Artillery 
Lodge No. 937, E.C. (now Lodge United Service No. 24), and he was 



MASONIC CORRESPONDENCE. 191 



installed as Wor. master of Lodge Balmain No. 868, E.C. (now Lodge 
Balmain No. 23), on the 11th December, 1878. 

In our grand lodge he was senior grand warden in 1889-90, and dep- 
uty grand master 1891-2, under the rule of the M.W. grand master, His 
Excellency the Earl of Jersey. 

Although frequently requested to allow himself to be nominated for 
the office of grand master of this grand lodge he declined the honour 
until 1899. On the 24th July of that year he was elected and installed 
as most worshipful grand master of this grand lodge, and year after 
year was re-elected to that position, handing over the reins of office to 
myself on the 24th April, 1906, when he installed me as your grand 
master. 

He was also the grand representative near this grand lodge of the 
Grand Lodges of Ireland and Denmark. 

His address on the occasion of the celebration of the Centenary of 
the Dawn of Freemasonry in New South Wales delivered in the Town 
Hall, Sydney, on the 20th July, 1903, deserved the enconiums passed 
upon it by the grand lodges of the world, and will forever remain a 
monument of his wisdom, strength, and ability. 

His work for Masonry will never be forgotten by the craft through- 
out the world, and more particularly by the members of the fraternity 
in New South Wales. Always enthusiastic, he worked diligently, faith- 
fully, zealously, and intelligently for everything tending to the progress 
of Freemasonry, and although some of his works and actions may not 
at the time have found favour with all, still all his works and actions 
will remain forever largely recorded in the annals of Freemasonry. 

He was brave and strong. He loved the right for right's sake, and 
he Was firm, loyal and steadfast in all his actions. 

The grand inspector of workings alluded to the excellent work of 
the lodges, and said : 

I have also been pleased to notice, in several cases, that in the ab- 
sence of lodge work for the evening lectures have been delivered. This 
is a splendid idea, but the subject matter should always be kept within 
the circle of Masonic teaching; nothing of a religious, political, or con- 
troversial character should be allowed. 

The question having arisen as to whether the reports of the board 
of general purposes to the grand lodge could be discussed or not, the 
grand master ruled that upon the motion for the reception of the report 
there could be no discussion or argument ; but, if there is any omission, 
any brother can move that the report be referred back to the board. 
This savors too much of "gag law" to suit our ideas of the way to dis- 
pose of the report of a com